UArizona Aims to Provide Rapid Tests for Individuals Exposed to Biothreats and Pathogens, Such as COVID-19UArizona Aims to Provide Rapid Tests for Individuals Exposed to Biothreats and Pathogens, Such as COVID-19<div class="ExternalClassB8A82FB060624E5FA321BCE44452036E"><html> <p style="text-align:center;">​<span style="color:rgb(155, 155, 155);font-family:miloweb, -apple-system, blinkmacsystemfont, "segoe ui", roboto, "helvetica neue", arial, "noto sans", sans-serif, "apple color emoji", "segoe ui emoji", "segoe ui symbol", "noto color emoji";font-size:15px;text-transform:uppercase;background-color:window;">TERESA JOSEPH</span></p> <div> <div> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;" class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden"> <br> </span> </div> <a style="box-sizing:border-box;color:rgb(1, 28, 72);font-family:miloweb, -apple-system, blinkmacsystemfont, "segoe ui", roboto, "helvetica neue", arial, "noto sans", sans-serif, "apple color emoji", "segoe ui emoji", "segoe ui symbol", "noto color emoji";font-size:16px;" href="https://twitter.com/uazmedphx/" target="_blank" class="field_media_contact_twitter_url"></a> <br> </div> <p> <span style="color:rgb(33, 33, 33);font-family:miloweb, -apple-system, blinkmacsystemfont, "segoe ui", roboto, "helvetica neue", arial, "noto sans", sans-serif, "apple color emoji", "segoe ui emoji", "segoe ui symbol", "noto color emoji";font-size:1.25rem;font-weight:700;background-color:window;">​Thanks to a U.S. Department of Defense Contract for as Much as $9.5 Million, College of Medicine – Phoenix and Partners Aim to Develop a Portable Device to Easily and Accurately Detect Biological Threats</span> </p> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;color:rgb(96, 96, 96);font-size:15px;line-height:20px;margin-bottom:3rem;font-family:miloweb, -apple-system, blinkmacsystemfont, "segoe ui", roboto, "helvetica neue", arial, "noto sans", sans-serif, "apple color emoji", "segoe ui emoji", "segoe ui symbol", "noto color emoji";" class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:1rem;">To better protect individuals serving on battlefields or dealing with an event, such as the <a style="box-sizing:border-box;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(171, 5, 32);text-decoration-line:underline;transition:all 0.3s ease 0s;" href="https://phoenixmed.arizona.edu/covid-19" target="_blank">COVID-19 global pandemic</a>, as well as potential future pandemics, scientists at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix are leading an effort to develop a device for easy, quick and accurate detection of pathogens and biological threats.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:1rem;"> <a style="box-sizing:border-box;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(171, 5, 32);text-decoration-line:underline;transition:all 0.3s ease 0s;" href="https://phoenixmed.arizona.edu/anbm" target="_blank">The Center for Applied Nanobioscience and Medicine</a> (ANBM) at the UArizona College of Medicine – Phoenix is heading the effort, under an Other Transaction Agreement (OTA) with the <a style="box-sizing:border-box;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(171, 5, 32);text-decoration-line:underline;transition:all 0.3s ease 0s;" href="https://www.dtra.mil/" target="_blank">Defense Threat Reduction Agency</a> (DTRA), an agency within the U.S. Department of Defense. The agreement is a $9.5 million ceiling contract for three years, to provide about 3,000 devices.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:1rem;"> <a style="box-sizing:border-box;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(171, 5, 32);text-decoration-line:underline;transition:all 0.3s ease 0s;" href="https://phoenixmed.arizona.edu/anbm/zenhausern" target="_blank">Frederic Zenhausern, PhD</a>, ANBM director and interim co-chair of the <a style="box-sizing:border-box;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(171, 5, 32);text-decoration-line:underline;transition:all 0.3s ease 0s;" href="https://phoenixmed.arizona.edu/bms" target="_blank">Department of Basic Medical Sciences</a>, and his team members, including associate professor Jian Gu, PhD, are creating the device, in collaboration with scientists from the University of Nevada, Arizona State University, Duke University and Whitespace Enterprise — an Arizona-based startup founded by Dr. Zenhausern. The group is responsible for mass production of the technology.<img style="box-sizing:border-box;border-width:0px;vertical-align:middle;float:right;max-width:100%;margin:5px;width:0px;" title="" src="https://phoenixmed.arizona.edu/sites/default/files/inline-images/zenhausern-story_0.jpg" data-entity-uuid="8296785b-4bb8-4af1-859d-35b8cd92735a" data-entity-type="file" class="img-fluid align-right" alt="Frederic Zenhausern, PhD" /></p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:1rem;">“An individual in a combat zone or a first responder in the field could know within minutes if they have — or were exposed to — a serious pathogen or biothreat,” Dr. Zenhausern said. “We want the brave individuals serving on the front lines to be safe, and this device potentially could prevent a next pandemic by providing rapid diagnostic testing for a broad range of threats, including coronaviruses.”</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:1rem;">The team is developing a vertical flow immunoassay (VFI) diagnostic test that interfaces with a smartphone, as the only system component requiring battery power. Users would take a small finger prick of blood, or a syringe of urine, and then push the liquid onto a test strip. Essentially the device would take a picture of that paper membrane, which would be analyzed and sent back to the users, telling them if they have been exposed to pathogens, such as anthrax or Y. pestis, which can cause the plague or possibly other bacteria and viruses.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:1rem;">Two major platforms for microbial diagnostics are available, including polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests, which look at the nucleic acid molecules of the organism, and antibody or immunoassay testing. The immunoassay test typically is color-coded, like a pregnancy test, and uses a lateral flow immunoassay method that involves a piece of paper upon which biofluid, such as blood or urine, is placed.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:1rem;">The biofluid would migrate along the paper and meet different antibodies to determine if an individual’s body has produced an immune response to the virus, or if antigens could be detected. Then an interaction occurs, signaling the individual has been exposed to the biothreat, like a line appearing through the paper.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:1rem;">“Lateral flow immunoassay tests are limited to only a few antibodies and are not very sensitive or fast, but they are inexpensive and safe, which has made it a popular option in the past,” Dr. Zenhausern said. “Through our device, we are combining the benefit of both platforms by increasing capabilities of looking at a much broader panel of disease signatures while significantly increasing the test sensitivity by orders of magnitude.”</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:1rem;">A vertical flow immunoassay test is when biofluids go toward and through the paper, not by capillarity, along surface of the test strip. This changes the mechanisms of fluidics and physics, which allows testing to look at multiple biomarkers for a wider range of pathogens, instead of just looking at one target biomarker.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:1rem;">“It’s much faster and more sensitive,” Dr. Zenhausern explained, adding this device would have more capabilities than technology currently available and could be applied to illnesses, such as influenza, Ebola or the COVID-19 threat — or any other biological signature.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:1rem;">“Dr. Zenhausern’s team at the University of Arizona Health Sciences and additional collaborators have worked tirelessly to take this idea from concept to production, and I am grateful for their dedication,” said University of Arizona President <a style="box-sizing:border-box;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(171, 5, 32);text-decoration-line:underline;transition:all 0.3s ease 0s;" href="https://president.arizona.edu/dr-robert-c-robbins-biography" target="_blank">Robert C. Robbins, MD</a>. “This research is an incredible example of how university research directly serves the community. By protecting first responders and others who have an increased likelihood of pathogen exposure, including those serving in combat zones, we can improve public health and prevent future outbreaks. I am immensely proud of our faculty who are spearheading this vital work, and I am eager to see its impact.”</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:1rem;">Dr. Zenhausern said, due to the pandemic, a change in the health care delivery system will occur. “We will need to have rapid testing that is less invasive and more personalized.”</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:1rem;">A previously DTRA-sponsored program successfully established design rules of the proposed VFI platform technology, which will be scaled up for this product-development project. This increase would encompass the U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulatory filing and delivery of thousands of devices. The OTA contract also includes a subsequent production option for future commercialization and possible stockpiling through the Department of Defense.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:1rem;">The OTA program is a partnership among several investigators and their teams, which have been collaborating for many years. These teams are led by world-renowned scientists such as David Aucoin, PhD (University of Nevada Reno); Tuan Vo-Dinh, PhD (Duke University); and Doug Montgomery, PhD (Arizona State University); as well as many industry partners.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:1rem;">The collaboration among most of these institutions began in 2016 after receiving about $2 million in a DTRA contract to study this technology and determine how it could be applied for the detection of Tier-1 bioagents in defense operations.<br></p> </div> <p> <br> </p> </html></div>https://biomedicalphoenix.com/Lists/News/Attachments/64/zenhauern-dod.jpg2020-07-23T07:00:00ZUA
TGEN’S ASHION ANALYTICS® AND HONORHEALTH SHOW HOW ‘ORGANOIDS’ CAN HELP PINPOINT THE RIGHT THERAPIES FOR CANCER PATIENTSTGEN’S ASHION ANALYTICS® AND HONORHEALTH SHOW HOW ‘ORGANOIDS’ CAN HELP PINPOINT THE RIGHT THERAPIES FOR CANCER PATIENTS<div class="ExternalClass71754A0ACB574D3BAF61A3A87600FB30"><html> <p style="text-align:center;"> <span style="font-style:italic;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;background-color:window;box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">Written by</span> <span style="font-style:italic;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;background-color:window;"> </span> <span style="font-style:italic;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;background-color:window;box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;" class="uBlogsy_author_name"> <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);outline:0px !important;" title="Steve Yozwiak" href="https://www.tgen.org/news/?author=Steve+Yozwiak" target="_blank">Steve Yozwiak</a> </span> </p> <p style="text-align:left;"></p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin-right:-15px;margin-left:-15px;" class="row"> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;min-height:1px;padding-right:15px;padding-left:15px;float:left;width:667.5px;" class="col-md-12"> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);"> <em style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">New PATRIOT analysis unveiled at this week’s AACR meeting; builds on Ashion’s GEM-ExTra program, providing unprecedented accuracy in prescribing anti-cancer treatments</em> </p> </div> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin-right:-15px;margin-left:-15px;" class="row"> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;min-height:1px;padding-right:15px;padding-left:15px;float:left;width:667.5px;" class="col-md-12"> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;font-weight:700;">PHOENIX, Ariz. — June 22, 2020 —</span> Precision medicine, using the power of the human genome to diagnose and treat patients, is about to get even more precise.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);">A new program called PATRIOT, developed by the <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.tgen.org/" target="_blank">Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen)</a>, an affiliate of <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.cityofhope.org/homepage" target="_blank">City of Hope</a>, is using organoids — laboratory cultures derived from samples of patient tumors — to provide a whole new level of accuracy in prescribing anti-cancer treatments.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);">PATRIOT builds on other precision medicine programs devised by <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="http://ashion.com/" target="_blank">Ashion Analytics</a>, a TGen clinical laboratory, which uses its <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="http://ashion.com/physicians-2/" target="_blank">GEM ExTra</a><span style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;font-size:10.5px;line-height:0;vertical-align:baseline;top:-0.5em;">® </span>proprietary test to match each patient’s unique cancer to the best available cancer treatments.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);">PATRIOT, which stands for <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.abstractsonline.com/pp8/#%21/9045/presentation/3954" target="_blank"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;font-weight:700;">PAT</span>hway based <span style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;font-weight:700;">R</span>NA and DNA <span style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;font-weight:700;">I</span>ntegration with tumor <span style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;font-weight:700;">O</span>rganoid <span style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;font-weight:700;">T</span>esting for clinical therapeutics</a>, will be showcased in a study presentation June 22-24 at the second 2020 virtual annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR).</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);">“Cancer tumors are complicated,” said Dr. Sunil Sharma, Deputy Director of TGen Clinical Sciences and Chief of Translational Oncology and Drug Development at the HonorHealth Research Institute. “PATRIOT is a very powerful platform that will make GEM ExTra even more powerful. This will expand the use of RNA analysis in a way that has never been used before.”</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);">In this system, organoids — which can mimic the reactions of solid tumors in patients’ bodies —are grown in a laboratory and then used to test different anti-cancer therapies.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);">“It’s a way of conducting clinical trials on a laboratory plate,” said Dr. Sharma, who also is a Professor and Director of TGen’s Applied Cancer Research and Drug Discovery Division.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);">The study being presented at AACR shows how Dr. Sharma’s TGen lab, using melanoma tumor samples provided by HonorHealth, used the new PATRIOT system to identify potential therapeutic targets by focusing on molecular pathways within tumor cells, a level of analysis that goes beyond searching for mutations in DNA, and even builds on top of the intricate analysis of RNA-expression provided by Ashion’s GEM ExTra.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);">“These druggable targets were validated on the tumor organoids,” said Dr. Sharma, who hails the system as a whole new way to provide therapeutic benefit to patients. “This allows for a holistic assessment of a patient’s tumor for improving therapy recommendations and expanding personalized therapy options.”</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);">In addition, he said, PATRIOT analysis of organoids gives investigators the ability to test immunotherapy options in the laboratory.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);">Ashion’s GEM ExTra platform already has expanded the therapeutic potential of <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.genome.gov/about-genomics/fact-sheets/DNA-Sequencing-Fact-Sheet" target="_blank">genomic sequencing</a> by using RNA sequencing to identify novel fusions and alternate transcripts, providing additional tumor profiling data in addition to that identified by DNA sequencing.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);">Unlike many other genomic sequencing tests, which use panels of dozens or even hundreds of known cancer-causing genomic variants, Ashion’s GEM ExTra screens cancer patients for <em style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">all</em> of the nearly 3 billion nucleotides, or letters, in human DNA, which includes more than 19,000 genes.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);">The next step, Dr. Sharma said, is to test the predictions from PATRIOT and GEM ExTra analysis of patient organoids in the laboratory to see if they might work in a larger clinical trial.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);">This study was supported by funding from Flinn Foundation grant #2193.<br style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;"><br style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;"></p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);text-align:center;"># # #</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;font-weight:700;">About TGen, an affiliate of City of Hope<br style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;"></span>Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life-changing results. TGen is affiliated with City of Hope, a world-renowned independent research and treatment center for cancer, diabetes and other life-threatening diseases: <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.cityofhope.org/homepage" target="_blank">www.cityofhope.org</a>.  This precision medicine affiliation enables both institutes to complement each other in research and patient care, with City of Hope providing a significant clinical setting to advance scientific discoveries made by TGen. TGen is focused on helping patients with neurological disorders, cancer, diabetes and infectious diseases through cutting-edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research toward patient benefit).  TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and complex rare diseases in adults and children.  Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.tgen.org/" target="_blank">www.tgen.org</a>. Follow TGen on <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.facebook.com/helptgen" target="_blank">Facebook</a>, <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.linkedin.com/company/tgen/" target="_blank">LinkedIn</a> and <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://twitter.com/TGen" target="_blank">Twitter @TGen</a>.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;font-weight:700;">About Ashion Analytics<br style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;"></span>At Ashion, our goal is to accelerate the adoption of genomic analysis for clinical decision support to improve the treatment of patients with refractory, rare or aggressive disease. We are experts at Next-Generation Sequencing-based clinical laboratory services, deriving our pedigree from the pioneering precision medicine work at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) in Phoenix. Ashion Analytics’ mission is to develop and deliver the premier personalized medicine diagnostic, data analytic, and clinical coordination services, which assist healthcare providers in offering their patients individualized treatment options, and which improve outcomes.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;font-weight:700;">About HonorHealth <br style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;"></span>HonorHealth is a non-profit, local community healthcare system serving an area of 1.6 million people in the greater Phoenix area. The network encompasses five acute-care hospitals, an extensive medical group, outpatient surgery centers, a cancer care network, clinical research, medical education, a foundation and community services with approximately 12,300 employees, 3,700 affiliated physicians and 3,100 volunteers. HonorHealth was formed by a merger between Scottsdale Healthcare and John C. Lincoln Health Network. HonorHealth’s mission is to improve the health and well-being of those we serve. Learn more at <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://honorhealth.com/" target="_blank">HonorHealth.com</a></p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;font-weight:700;">About HonorHealth Research Institute<br style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;"></span>HonorHealth Research Institute is helping shape the future of medicine. We're finding cures and improving treatments in areas like gene therapy, early drug/device development, early detection and prevention of disease. Through our clinical trials and applied research, we’ve given hope and improved the lives of patients from all 50 states and 28 different countries around the globe. Our advanced technologies and cutting-edge treatment options are introducing tomorrow’s cures, today. For more information on oncology clinical trials for cancer contact HonorHealth Research Institute Nurse Navigators (480) 323-1364 or email <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="mailto:clinicaltrials@honorhealth.com" target="_blank">clinicaltrials@honorhealth.com</a> or learn more at <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.honorhealth.com/research" target="_blank">HonorHealth.com/research</a>.  Follow HonorHealth Research Institute on <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.facebook.com/HonorHealthcares" target="_blank">Facebook</a>, <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.linkedin.com/company/honorhealth" target="_blank">LinkedIn</a> and <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://twitter.com/HRInstitute_AZ" target="_blank">Twitter @HRInstitute_AZ. </a> </p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;font-weight:700;">Media Contact:<br style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;"></span>Steve Yozwiak<br style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">TGen Senior Science Writer<br style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">602-343-8704<br style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;"><a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="mailto:syozwiak@tgen.org" target="_blank">syozwiak@tgen.org</a></p> <aside class="uBlogsy_post_details" style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;"> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;overflow:hidden;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;" class="uBlogsy_tag_container"> <ul style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:10px;padding-left:0px;margin-left:5px;list-style:none;font-size:11px;" class="margin-left-5 list-inline tags-v2 uBlogsy_font_style50"></ul> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;" class="uBlogsy_label_container"> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;" class="uBlogsy_labels_container"></div> </div> </aside>​<br></div> </div> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span> <p style="text-align:left;"> <br> </p> <p style="text-align:center;"> <br> </p> <ul style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:10px;padding-left:0px;margin-left:-5px;list-style:none;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;" class="list-inline posted-info"> <li style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;display:inline-block;padding-right:5px;padding-left:5px;font-style:italic;"> <div style="text-align:center;"> <br> <br> <br> </div> </li> </ul> <p> <br> </p> </html></div>https://biomedicalphoenix.com/Lists/News/Attachments/59/dr_sunil_sharma.jpg2020-07-22T07:00:00ZAshion Analytics
TGEN’S ASHION ANALYTICS CERTIFIED FOR NCI’S MATCH CANCER CLINICAL TRIALSTGEN’S ASHION ANALYTICS CERTIFIED FOR NCI’S MATCH CANCER CLINICAL TRIALS<div class="ExternalClass5F8DAADB97B14A0092D5EC15B5354F62"><html> <p style="text-align:center;">​<span style="font-style:italic;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;background-color:window;box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">Written by</span><span style="font-style:italic;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;background-color:window;"> </span><span style="font-style:italic;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;background-color:window;box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;" class="uBlogsy_author_name"><a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);outline:0px !important;" title="Steve Yozwiak" href="https://www.tgen.org/news/?author=Steve+Yozwiak" target="_blank">Steve Yozwiak</a></span></p> <p style="text-align:left;"></p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;font-weight:700;">PHOENIX, Ariz. — June 11, 2020 —</span> <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="http://ashion.com/" target="_blank">Ashion Analytics</a>, a clinical laboratory of the <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.tgen.org/" target="_blank">Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen)</a>, an affiliate of <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.cityofhope.org/homepage" target="_blank">City of Hope</a>, is now part of the National Cancer Institute’s MATCH program, which provides patients who have rare or difficult-to-treat cancers with access to unique clinical trials nationwide that might give them the best therapeutic treatments and outcomes.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);">Ashion is one of the nation’s few dozen institutes participating in <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/treatment/clinical-trials/nci-supported/nci-match" target="_blank">MATCH</a>, which stands for <span style="text-decoration:underline;">M</span>olecular <span style="text-decoration:underline;">A</span>nalysis for <span style="text-decoration:underline;">T</span>herapy <span style="text-decoration:underline;">CH</span>oice.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);">Unlike other MATCH participants, which screen patients with panels consisting of a few hundred known gene variants associated with various cancers, Ashion screens cancer patients for <em style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">all</em> of the nearly 3 billion nucleotides, or letters, in human DNA, which includes more than 19,000 genes. Ashion accomplishes this by performing <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.genome.gov/about-genomics/fact-sheets/DNA-Sequencing-Fact-Sheet" target="_blank">genomic sequencing</a> — a molecular-level analysis of each patient’s entire genome. Ashion scientists then <em style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">match</em> each patient’s unique cancer to the best available cancer treatments.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);">“Our genomic cancer analysis is one of the nation’s most comprehensive tests, not only for the MATCH program, but for any cancer patient whose treating physician, or medical team, requires our precision-medicine guidance,” said Dr. Janine LoBello, Ashion’s Medical Director.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);">One of the biggest perks for patients who become eligible to enroll in MATCH clinical trials is that the federal government covers the cost of their drugs, which can be substantial, often reaching six figures. MATCH patients, or their medical insurance providers, usually pick up other clinical costs.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;font-weight:700;"> <em style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">GEM ExTra</em> </span> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;font-weight:700;"> analyzes complete patient genome</span> </p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);">To achieve this complete analytic coverage of the <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.genome.gov/about-genomics/fact-sheets" target="_blank">human genome</a>, Ashion uses a proprietary test called <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="http://ashion.com/physicians-2/" target="_blank"><em style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">GEM ExTra</em></a>, which covers all protein coding regions of DNA (known as the <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.broadinstitute.org/blog/what-exome-sequencing" target="_blank">Exome</a>), <em style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">and</em> an analysis of all RNA, the messengers of DNA (known as the <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.genome.gov/about-genomics/fact-sheets/Transcriptome-Fact-Sheet" target="_blank">Transcriptome</a>). <em style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">GEM</em> stands for <span style="text-decoration:underline;">G</span>enomic <span style="text-decoration:underline;">E</span>nabled <span style="text-decoration:underline;">M</span>edicine, and <em style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">ExTra</em> stands for <span style="text-decoration:underline;">Ex</span>ome and <span style="text-decoration:underline;">Tra</span>nscriptome.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);">Using <em style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">GEM ExTra</em>, Ashion sequences both the individual patient’s normal genome and the patient’s cancer genome. Then the two sets of genomic data are compared to find the gene changes, known as mutations, that are specific to the tumor and may be potentially driving that patient’s cancer.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;font-weight:700;">Study highlighting RNA role presented at recent ASCO meeting</span> </p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);">An Ashion study poster presented May 29-31 at the 2020 annual meeting of the American Society for Clinical Oncology (ASCO) details the importance of using RNA as part of the analysis to give cancer physicians the best possible options for treating their patients: <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://ascopubs.org/doi/abs/10.1200/JCO.2020.38.15_suppl.3628" target="_blank"><em style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">Employing RNA Sequencing to Enhance Treatment Options for Cancer Patients</em></a>.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);">“As you can imagine, this requires billions of precise data points to understand each patient’s molecular makeup; to understand which genes are the likely culprits involved in the patient’s cancer, and what therapeutic drug, or drugs, may be best to counter the patient’s disease,” Dr. LoBello explained.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);">This could include new therapeutics, as well as existing drugs already approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for a particular cancer. These FDA-approved drugs could be repurposed to fight a different cancer through any of the more than 1,100 sites nationwide that are conducting NCI-MATCH clinical trials. Clinical trials are most often the first tests of drugs in human patients, after the drugs have undergone substantial computer and laboratory testing to ensure they are safe and effective.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);">“We are excited to be selected by the National Cancer Institute to participate in the NCI’s MATCH program, and we hope that more patients will benefit from this program as a result of our <em style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">GEM ExTra</em> testing,” said Thomas Royce, Executive Director of Ashion.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);">For more information, please visit <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="http://ashion.com/" target="_blank">ashion.com</a> or call 844-539-3309.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);text-align:center;"># # #</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;font-weight:700;">About Ashion Analytics<br style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;"></span>At Ashion, our goal is to accelerate the adoption of genomic analysis for clinical decision support to improve the treatment of patients with refractory, rare or aggressive disease. We are experts at Next-Generation Sequencing-based clinical laboratory services, deriving our pedigree from the pioneering precision medicine work at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) in Phoenix. Ashion Analytics’ mission is to develop and deliver the premier personalized medicine diagnostic, data analytic, and clinical coordination services, which assist healthcare providers in offering their patients individualized treatment options, and which improve outcomes.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;font-weight:700;">About TGen, an affiliate of City of Hope<br style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;"></span>Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life-changing results. TGen is affiliated with City of Hope, a world-renowned independent research and treatment center for cancer, diabetes and other life-threatening diseases: <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.cityofhope.org/homepage" target="_blank">www.cityofhope.org</a>.  This precision medicine affiliation enables both institutes to complement each other in research and patient care, with City of Hope providing a significant clinical setting to advance scientific discoveries made by TGen. TGen is focused on helping patients with neurological disorders, cancer, diabetes and infectious diseases through cutting-edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research toward patient benefit).  TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and complex rare diseases in adults and children.  Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.tgen.org/" target="_blank">www.tgen.org</a>. Follow TGen on <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.facebook.com/helptgen" target="_blank">Facebook</a>, <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.linkedin.com/company/tgen/" target="_blank">LinkedIn</a> and <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://twitter.com/TGen" target="_blank">Twitter @TGen</a>.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;font-weight:700;">Media Contact:<br style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;"></span>Steve Yozwiak<br style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">TGen Senior Science Writer<br style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">602-343-8704<br style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;"><a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="mailto:syozwiak@tgen.org" target="_blank">syozwiak@tgen.org</a></p> <aside class="uBlogsy_post_details" style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;"> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;overflow:hidden;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;" class="uBlogsy_tag_container"> <ul style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:10px;padding-left:0px;margin-left:5px;list-style:none;font-size:11px;" class="margin-left-5 list-inline tags-v2 uBlogsy_font_style50"></ul> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;" class="uBlogsy_label_container"> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;" class="uBlogsy_labels_container"></div> </div> </aside>​<span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span><p style="text-align:left;"><br></p><ul style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:10px;padding-left:0px;margin-left:-5px;list-style:none;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;" class="list-inline posted-info"><li style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;display:inline-block;padding-right:5px;padding-left:5px;font-style:italic;"><div><br><br></div></li></ul><p><br></p></html></div>https://biomedicalphoenix.com/Lists/News/Attachments/60/janine-lobello.jpg2020-07-11T07:00:00ZAshion Analytics
TGEN IDENTIFIES IMMUNE EFFECTS OF A DRUG IN AGGRESSIVE OVARIAN CANCER THAT STRIKES YOUNG WOMENTGEN IDENTIFIES IMMUNE EFFECTS OF A DRUG IN AGGRESSIVE OVARIAN CANCER THAT STRIKES YOUNG WOMEN<div class="ExternalClass207EB5948D8F4134B1E852EF61A11E07"><html> <p>​<span style="color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;background-color:window;box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;font-weight:700;">PHOENIX, Ariz. — July 10, 2020 —</span><span style="color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;background-color:window;"> </span><span style="color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;background-color:window;">A drug known as SP-2577 could help enable the body’s own immune system to attack ovarian cancer, according to a study led by the</span><span style="color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;background-color:window;"> </span><a style="font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;background-color:transparent;box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.tgen.org/" target="_blank">Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen)</a><span style="color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;background-color:window;">, an affiliate of</span><span style="color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;background-color:window;"> </span><a style="font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;background-color:transparent;box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.cityofhope.org/homepage" target="_blank">City of Hope</a><span style="color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;background-color:window;">.</span></p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">Published today in the scientific journal <em style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">PLOS ONE</em>, the study builds on years of research led by <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.tgen.org/faculty-profiles/jeffrey-trent/" target="_blank">Dr. Jeffrey Trent</a>, TGen President and Research Director, into a type of ovarian cancer known as Small Cell Carcinoma of the Ovary, Hypercalcemic Type (SCCOHT), an aggressive and deadly cancer that usually strikes girls and young women.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">Clinical trials already are on the horizon to test SP-2577 in combination with another proven immunotherapeutic compound for the first time in patients with SCCOHT.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">“Immunotherapy is the future of cancer treatment. Our combination of drugs should promote an immune response in an ovarian cancer that usually does not respond well to immunotherapies,” said Dr. Raffaella Soldi, a TGen Research Associate Professor and the lead author of the study. “One drug opens a biological gate, while the other drug helps push immune cells through the gate to attack the cancer.”</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">SP-2577, also known as Seclidemstat, was developed in the laboratory of <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.tgen.org/faculty-profiles/sunil-sharma/" target="_blank">Dr. Sunil Sharma</a>, TGen Deputy Director of Clinical Sciences, and senior author of the study. Seclidemstat has already shown to be a promising drug in clinical trials against a bone cancer known as Ewing sarcoma.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">Dr. Sharma, who also is Director of TGen’s Applied Cancer Research and Drug Discovery Division, explained that Seclidemstat works by inhibiting LSD1, a protein that is abundant in SCCOHT ovarian cancer. LSD1 also is implicated in initiating and aggressively accelerating many other types of cancer.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">“We suggest in this paper that LSD1 inhibition should improve the immune-therapy response in these tumors,” Dr. Sharma said. “This treatment is exquisitely dependent on the mutation found by Dr. Trent and his group. Without that mutation, this treatment would not work.”</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">In 2014, Dr. Trent led and international team of investigators who discovered that <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.tgen.org/news/2014/march/23/tgen-study-discovers-genetic-cause-of-rare-type-of-ovarian-cancer/?search=SMARCA4" target="_blank">a single mutation in a gene called SMARCA4</a> triggered SCCOHT. The SMARCA4 gene — previously associated with lung, brain and pancreatic cancer — was the only recurrently mutated gene in the study's ovarian cancer samples, a finding that at the time Dr. Trent likened to “a genetic superhighway.”</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">"Many genetic anomalies can be like a one-lane road to cancer; difficult to negotiate. But these findings indicate a genetic superhighway that leads right to this highly aggressive disease," Dr. Trent said at the time of his team’s discovery. "The correlation between mutations in SMARCA4 and the development of SCCOHT is simply unmistakable."</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">The study published today in <em style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">PLOS ONE</em> — <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0235705" target="_blank"><em style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">The novel reversible LSD1 inhibitor SP-2577 promotes anti-tumor immunity in SWItch/Sucrose-NonFermentable (SWI/SNF) complex mutated ovarian cancer</em></a> — is based on TGen laboratory findings.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">In an upcoming clinical trial for those with SCCOHT ovarian cancer, patients will receive Seclidemstat plus another drug, Pembrolizumab, a proven immunotherapy treatment that prevents cancer from hiding from the body’s immune system. It uncloaks the tumor so immune cells can see the cancer and attack it.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">Also contributing to this study were: the Lineberger Cancer Center at the University of North Carolina, HonorHealth Research Institute, and the Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">Seclidemstat was developed by Salarius Pharmaceuticals of Houston, which was established with the help of Dr. Sharma.<br style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;"><br style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;"><br style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;"># # # <br style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;"><br style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;font-weight:700;">About TGen, an affiliate of City of Hope<br style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;"></span>Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life-changing results. TGen is affiliated with City of Hope, a world-renowned independent research and treatment center for cancer, diabetes and other life-threatening diseases: <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.cityofhope.org/homepage" target="_blank">www.cityofhope.org</a>.  This precision medicine affiliation enables both institutes to complement each other in research and patient care, with City of Hope providing a significant clinical setting to advance scientific discoveries made by TGen. TGen is focused on helping patients with neurological disorders, cancer, diabetes and infectious diseases through cutting-edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research toward patient benefit).  TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and complex rare diseases in adults and children.  Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.tgen.org/" target="_blank">www.tgen.org</a>. Follow TGen on <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.facebook.com/helptgen" target="_blank">Facebook</a>, <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.linkedin.com/company/tgen/" target="_blank">LinkedIn</a> and <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://twitter.com/TGen" target="_blank">Twitter @TGen</a>.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;font-weight:700;">Media Contact:<br style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;"></span>Steve Yozwiak<br style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">TGen Senior Science Writer<br style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">602-343-8704<br style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;"><a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="mailto:syozwiak@tgen.org" target="_blank">syozwiak@tgen.org</a>​<br></p> <p> <br> </p> </html></div>2020-07-10T07:00:00ZTGen
TGEN-LED STUDY IDENTIFIES UNIQUE CELLS THAT MAY DRIVE LUNG FIBROSISTGEN-LED STUDY IDENTIFIES UNIQUE CELLS THAT MAY DRIVE LUNG FIBROSIS<div class="ExternalClassED898073AC8A42429846DC70A63B3AC2"><html> <p>​<span style="font-style:italic;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;background-color:window;box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">Written by</span><span style="font-style:italic;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;background-color:window;"> </span><span class="uBlogsy_author_name" style="font-style:italic;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;background-color:window;box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;"><a target="_blank" href="https://www.tgen.org/news/?author=Steve+Yozwiak" title="Steve Yozwiak" style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);outline:0px !important;">Steve Yozwiak</a></span></p> <p>​<span style="color:rgb(85, 85, 85);background-color:window;font-family:inherit;font-size:10pt;box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;font-weight:700;">PHOENIX, Ariz. — July 8, 2020 —</span><span style="color:rgb(85, 85, 85);background-color:window;font-family:inherit;font-size:10pt;"> </span><span style="color:rgb(85, 85, 85);background-color:window;font-family:inherit;font-size:10pt;">A groundbreaking study published today and led by the</span><span style="color:rgb(85, 85, 85);background-color:window;font-family:inherit;font-size:10pt;"> </span><a style="background-color:transparent;font-family:inherit;font-size:10pt;box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.tgen.org/" target="_blank">Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen)</a><span style="color:rgb(85, 85, 85);background-color:window;font-family:inherit;font-size:10pt;">, an affiliate of</span><span style="color:rgb(85, 85, 85);background-color:window;font-family:inherit;font-size:10pt;"> </span><a style="background-color:transparent;font-family:inherit;font-size:10pt;box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.cityofhope.org/homepage" target="_blank">City of Hope</a><span style="color:rgb(85, 85, 85);background-color:window;font-family:inherit;font-size:10pt;">, identifies unique lung cells that may drive Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF), a deadly lung disease that affects hundreds of thousands of Americans, and for which there is no cure.</span></p><p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);">This is one of the first comprehensive looks at lung cells using a technology called single-cell RNA sequencing. Instead of examining a mash-up of many cells from a tissue sample, single-cell sequencing allowed researchers in this study to closely examine the individual cells that make up the lungs; to identify their function, and ultimately understand the molecular changes that may be driving the disease.</p><p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);">Using this method, researchers identified five unique cells types associated with lung fibrosis, which could potentially lead to earlier diagnosis and therapeutic drug targets. </p><p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);">The study’s initial findings, published today as the cover story for the journal <em style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">Science Advances</em>, are the first under a combined <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.tgen.org/news/2019/march/27/nih-dod-grants-61-million-to-tgen-lung-research/?search=Banovich" target="_blank">$6.1 million in federal grants</a> aimed at uncovering the origins of lung disease, including IPF, the nation’s most common and severe form of fibrotic lung disease. An estimated 50,000 Americans, mostly middle-aged and older adults, are diagnosed each year with IPF. Most die from respiratory failure within five years.</p><p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);">In collaboration with <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.vumc.org/" target="_blank">Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC)</a><span style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">, r</span>esearchers analyzed tissue samples from 20 lungs with pulmonary fibrosis provided by the Norton Thoracic Institute and VUMC, and tissue samples from 10 healthy lungs provided by the <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.dnaz.org/" target="_blank">Donor Network of Arizona</a> and the <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://tds.dcids.org/" target="_blank">Tennessee Donor Services</a>.</p><p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);"><a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.tgen.org/faculty-profiles/nicholas-banovich/" target="_blank">Dr. Nicholas Banovich</a>, an Assistant Professor in TGen’s Integrated Cancer Genomics Division and co-senior author of the study, said the most interesting finding is the characterization of cells called <em style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">KRT5<span style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;font-size:10.5px;line-height:0;vertical-align:baseline;top:-0.5em;">-</span>/KRT17<span style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;font-size:10.5px;line-height:0;vertical-align:baseline;top:-0.5em;">+</span></em>, which appeared in the epithelium, or protective lining of the lungs, but only in individuals with pulmonary fibrosis.</p><p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);">“These cells are incredibly unique as they are clearly epithelial, but are also producing collagen and components of extra-cellular matrix (ECM), which make scar tissue,” Dr. Banovich said, “They are directly contributing to fibrosis.”  These cells also share characteristics of both the airway and alveolar epithelium, the respiratory membrane that allows the exchange of gases.</p><p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);">Another of the study’s most interesting findings is the high degree of plasticity, the ability of a cell to share characteristics with multiple classically defined cell types, in the lung epithelium.  </p><p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);">“Classically, the field used a small number of genes to determine cell types. With the single cell RNA sequencing approach, we find that it is often hard to draw a firm line between different types of cells,” Dr. Banovich said. “Instead of thinking of them as discrete cell types, we should think of them more along a continuum, and given the right stimulus, these cells can change their state.”</p><p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);">In addition to the <em style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">KRT5<span style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;font-size:10.5px;line-height:0;vertical-align:baseline;top:-0.5em;">-</span>/KRT17<span style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;font-size:10.5px;line-height:0;vertical-align:baseline;top:-0.5em;">+</span></em> cells, the study identified a cell type marked by the gene <em style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">SCGB3A2</em>. These cells are similar to club cells — an epithelial cell that lines the airways — yet are found almost exclusively in in pulmonary fibrosis. Unlike other airway epithelial cells, it appears these cells are able to transform into type 1 alveolar cells (AT1) — the cells where oxygen is taken into the body, and through which carbon dioxide is expelled — in an effort to repair damage to the lung.</p><p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);">“In addition to becoming AT1 cells, our results suggest the <em style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">SCGB3A2<span style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;font-size:10.5px;line-height:0;vertical-align:baseline;top:-0.5em;">+</span></em> cells can also become the  <em style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">KRT5<span style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;font-size:10.5px;line-height:0;vertical-align:baseline;top:-0.5em;">-</span>/KRT17<span style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;font-size:10.5px;line-height:0;vertical-align:baseline;top:-0.5em;">+</span></em> cells. It actually appears that, during the transformation into AT1 cells, the process is being hijacked and instead of helping repair the lungs these cells are pushed toward this weird pro-fibrotic epithelial cell that continues to drive fibrosis,” Dr. Banovich said.</p><p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);">Two other cells unveiled by the study are distinct subsets of fibroblasts, the cells that form normal connective tissue and scar tissue in the lungs, marked by high levels of the genes <em style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">PLIN2</em> or <em style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">HAS1</em>. These cells are also limited to pulmonary fibrosis.</p><p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);">IPF is a progressive and irreversible disease characterized by a dry cough, fatigue, aching muscles and joints, and ever worsening shortness of breath. IPF and PF both scar and stiffen the interstitium — the delicate lace-like network that supports the lungs' tiny air sacs. IPF has both genetic and environmental risk, but the exact cause is unknown and current treatments short of a lung transplant only slow disease progression. Lung transplants are radical surgeries that usually require months of waiting for available organs, and often require a long and sometimes agonizing recovery.</p><p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);">The study acknowledges the help of: 10x Genomics and the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative in developing technology optimizations of the single-cell RNA sequencing; and the patients and organ donors who made this work possible.</p><p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);">Also contributing to this study were co-first authors Austin Gutierrez and Dr. Linh Bui of TGen; and co-first author Arun Chris Habermann and co-senior author Dr. <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.kropskilab.org/" target="_blank">Jonathan Kropski</a> of VUMC.</p><p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);">The study — <em style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;"><a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://advances.sciencemag.org/content/6/28/eaba1972?rss=1" target="_blank">Single-cell RNA sequencing reveals profibrotic roles of distinct epithelial and mesenchymal lineages in pulmonary fibrosis</a></em> — also was funded by grants from: the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, and Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals.</p><div style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;text-align:center;"># # #</div><p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;font-weight:700;">About TGen, an affiliate of City of Hope<br style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;"></span>Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life-changing results. TGen is affiliated with City of Hope, a world-renowned independent research and treatment center for cancer, diabetes and other life-threatening diseases: <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.cityofhope.org/homepage" target="_blank">www.cityofhope.org</a>.  This precision medicine affiliation enables both institutes to complement each other in research and patient care, with City of Hope providing a significant clinical setting to advance scientific discoveries made by TGen. TGen is focused on helping patients with neurological disorders, cancer, diabetes and infectious diseases through cutting-edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research toward patient benefit).  TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and complex rare diseases in adults and children.  Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.tgen.org/" target="_blank">www.tgen.org</a>. Follow TGen on <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.facebook.com/helptgen" target="_blank">Facebook</a>, <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.linkedin.com/company/tgen/" target="_blank">LinkedIn</a> and <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://twitter.com/TGen" target="_blank">Twitter @TGen</a>.</p><p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;font-weight:700;">Media Contact:<br style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;"></span>Steve Yozwiak<br style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">TGen Senior Science Writer<br style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">602-343-8704<br style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;"><a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="mailto:syozwiak@tgen.org" target="_blank">syozwiak@tgen.org</a></p><aside class="uBlogsy_post_details" style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;"><div style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;overflow:hidden;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;" class="uBlogsy_tag_container"><ul style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:10px;padding-left:0px;margin-left:5px;list-style:none;font-size:11px;" class="margin-left-5 list-inline tags-v2 uBlogsy_font_style50"></ul></div><div style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;" class="uBlogsy_label_container"><div style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;" class="uBlogsy_labels_container"></div></div></aside><p><br><br></p> </html></div>https://biomedicalphoenix.com/Lists/News/Attachments/57/dr_nicholas_banovich.jpg2020-07-08T07:00:00ZTGen
Project SOAR Participant on Her Way to Princeton UniversityProject SOAR Participant on Her Way to Princeton University<div class="ExternalClass2A646094C70042CE969ED46745E84650"><html> ​<span style="font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif;font-size:16px;background-color:window;color:windowtext;">​Melanie Delgado Santacruz is a participant in the city’s ROSS for Education program - also known as Project SOAR (Student + Opportunities + Achievements = Results). She is a recent Phoenix Union Bioscience High School graduate.</span><br><div class="news-item-text2 full-text" style="height:auto;overflow:hidden;padding:10px 0px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"><p style="margin-bottom:14px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;line-height:18px !important;">She enrolled in Project SOAR in 2017 as a Sophomore with a 4.0 GPA, was a member of the National Honor Society and a participant with the Be A Leader Foundation. Be a Leader empowers students with leadership skills and support through high school.</p><p style="margin-bottom:14px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;line-height:18px !important;">Upon enrollment in the city’s program, Melanie was self-sufficient, however, she gained additional support from her Education Navigator, Bethany Neal, who was always available to provide advice on navigating the education system and case management services. Melanie completed her Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) in 2019 at the city’s College Depot. </p><p style="margin-bottom:14px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;line-height:18px !important;">Not only has Melanie completed high school, but she was accepted to Princeton University with a full-ride scholarship. She is one of 50 students chosen for the Jack Kent Cooke Scholarship and the only recipient from Arizona.</p><p style="margin-bottom:14px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;line-height:18px !important;">Melanie has started online classes with a summer bridge program for first-generation students and will officially start as a freshman at Princeton in the fall.</p><p style="margin-bottom:14px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;line-height:18px !important;">Melanie plans to major in engineering. She is very honored and excited to be attending Princeton.</p><p style="margin-bottom:14px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;line-height:18px !important;">CONGRATULATIONS Melanie!</p></div><div class="social-hashtags" style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"><label style="font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif;box-sizing:border-box;">Related Social Media Hashtags and Handles: </label><span style="font-weight:bold;box-sizing:border-box;"><a target="_blank" href="https://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/search?k=social:%40Princeton" style="color:rgb(32, 173, 149);background:transparent;font-family:hind, sans-serif;transition:all 0.2s ease-in-out 0s;box-sizing:border-box;">@Princeton</a></span></div><div class="keywords-container" style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"><label style="font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif;box-sizing:border-box;">Keywords: </label><span style="font-weight:bold;box-sizing:border-box;"><a target="_blank" href="https://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/search?k=kw:Project%20SOAR" style="color:rgb(32, 173, 149);background:transparent;font-family:hind, sans-serif;transition:all 0.2s ease-in-out 0s;box-sizing:border-box;">Project SOAR</a>, <a target="_blank" href="https://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/search?k=kw:ROSS%20for%20Education" style="color:rgb(32, 173, 149);background:transparent;font-family:hind, sans-serif;transition:all 0.2s ease-in-out 0s;box-sizing:border-box;">ROSS for Education</a>, <a target="_blank" href="https://www.phoenix.gov/newsroom/search?k=kw:College%20Depot" style="color:rgb(32, 173, 149);background:transparent;font-family:hind, sans-serif;transition:all 0.2s ease-in-out 0s;box-sizing:border-box;">College Depot</a>​</span></div><span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span><p><br></p> </html></div>https://biomedicalphoenix.com/Lists/News/Attachments/55/Newsroom_Housing_023.jpg2020-07-02T07:00:00ZPhoenix Bio News
TGEN TEAMS WITH POBA MEDICAL TO PRODUCE 10,000 COVID-19 TEST KITS PER MONTHTGEN TEAMS WITH POBA MEDICAL TO PRODUCE 10,000 COVID-19 TEST KITS PER MONTH<div class="ExternalClass1C5F4EADBBA94332BB8C1CE491751F56"><html> <p style="text-align:center;">​<span style="font-style:italic;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;background-color:window;box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">Written by</span><span style="font-style:italic;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;background-color:window;"> </span><span style="font-style:italic;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;background-color:window;box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;" class="uBlogsy_author_name"><a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);outline:0px !important;" title="Steve Yozwiak" href="https://www.tgen.org/news/?author=Steve+Yozwiak" target="_blank">Steve Yozwiak</a></span></p> <p style="text-align:left;"></p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;font-weight:700;">FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. — July 2, 2020 —</span> In response to the continuing need for more COVID-19 diagnostic tests, the <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.tgen.org/" target="_blank">Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen)</a>, an affiliate of <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.cityofhope.org/homepage" target="_blank">City of Hope</a>, is working with Poba Medical in northern Arizona to produce 10,000 coronavirus test kits per month, it was announced today.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;"> <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.pobamedical.com/" target="_blank">Poba Medical</a> is in the same industrial park near the Flagstaff airport as TGen’s Pathogen and Microbiome Division, the institute’s infectious disease branch, also known as TGen North, where TGen’s efforts against the new coronavirus is centered.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">This partnership is helping TGen North fill the gaps in Arizona’s testing systems by focusing on highly vulnerable and underserved groups across the state, including: tribal, indigent and psychiatric health services, county jails, front-line medical workers at community healthcare centers, and as needed for the Arizona Department of Health Services (ADHS).</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">A maker of specialized medical devices, Poba Medical’s large antiseptic cleanroom within its 20,000-square-foot facility is an ideal location for TGen’s COVID-19 test kit assembly line, said <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.tgen.org/faculty-profiles/david-engelthaler/" target="_blank">Dr. David Engelthaler</a>, Director of TGen North.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">“As part of TGen’s efforts to test, trace and treat patients with COVID-19, our partnership with Poba Medical is a logistical no-brainer. We can literally walk across a parking lot to get the kits as they are produced,” Dr. Engelthaler said. “We are fortunate to have such a strong partnership with another Flagstaff biomedical company.”</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">A maker of catheters and thermoplastic balloons for a variety of interventional devices and surgical applications, Poba Medical realized that they had extra capacity in their cleanroom to accommodate TGen’s test kit assembly, and without hindering any of their other ongoing medical equipment manufacturing.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">“Amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, our Poba Medical team became aware of TGen’s efforts to develop test kits in response to the pandemic, and we wanted to make sure that we contributed to the cause in the best way that our company could,” said Cristian Montanez, Poba Medical’s Senior Operations Manager.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">“Poba’s ability to assemble the test kits for TGen advances the overall effort to produce thousands of units quickly, and potentially save more lives,” Montanez said.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">TGen provides the contents of the test kits, including swabs, tubes and medium to stabilize the samples until they can be analyzed. They are then assembled into test kits in Poba Medical’s cleanroom assembly lines.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">“We are in constant contact with all of our partners across Arizona, and we can now ship these tests kits wherever needed, and whenever needed,” Dr. Engelthaler said. Couriers return boxes of completed test kits for TGen to analyze, and those boxes are then refilled by Poba Medical with new test kits so they can be sent out again to TGen’s medical service partners.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">To date, TGen has analyzed more than 15,000 COVID-19 samples, and continues to ramp up its testing capacities.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">Poba Medical, which opened in Flagstaff in January 2019, serves a range of global customers, from startups to large multi-national companies. TGen is its only COVID-19 test kit assembly customer. Please see a video of test kits as they are assembled: <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://youtu.be/qQV4Hu6JIPA" target="_blank">https://youtu.be/qQV4Hu6JIPA<br style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;"><br style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;"></a># # # </p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;font-weight:700;">About TGen, an affiliate of City of Hope<br style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;"></span>Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life-changing results. TGen is affiliated with City of Hope, a world-renowned independent research and treatment center for cancer, diabetes and other life-threatening diseases: <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.cityofhope.org/homepage" target="_blank">www.cityofhope.org</a>.  This precision medicine affiliation enables both institutes to complement each other in research and patient care, with City of Hope providing a significant clinical setting to advance scientific discoveries made by TGen. TGen is focused on helping patients with neurological disorders, cancer, diabetes and infectious diseases through cutting-edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research toward patient benefit).  TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and complex rare diseases in adults and children.  Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.tgen.org/" target="_blank">www.tgen.org</a>. Follow TGen on <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.facebook.com/helptgen" target="_blank">Facebook</a>, <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.linkedin.com/company/tgen/" target="_blank">LinkedIn</a> and <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://twitter.com/TGen" target="_blank">Twitter @TGen</a>.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;font-weight:700;">Media Contact:<br style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;"></span>Steve Yozwiak<br style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">TGen Senior Science Writer<br style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">602-343-8704<br style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;"><a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="mailto:syozwiak@tgen.org" target="_blank">syozwiak@tgen.org</a>​<br></p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span> <p style="text-align:left;"> <br> </p> <ul style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:10px;padding-left:0px;margin-left:-5px;list-style:none;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;" class="list-inline posted-info"> <li style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;display:inline-block;padding-right:5px;padding-left:5px;font-style:italic;"> <div> <br> <br> </div> </li> </ul> <p> <br> </p> </html></div>https://biomedicalphoenix.com/Lists/News/Attachments/58/dave-engelthaler-horizontal.jpg2020-07-02T07:00:00ZTGen
Arizona and COVID-19: A Doctor on the Front LinesArizona and COVID-19: A Doctor on the Front Lines<div class="ExternalClass9D792BF8AC314BCFA7F706D6B7CBF994"><html> <p style="text-align:center;">​In this June 27, 2020, file photo, medical personnel prepare to test hundreds of people lined up in vehicles in Phoenix's western neighborhood of Maryvale for free COVID-19 tests.</p> <p style="text-align:center;">( AP Photo/Matt York, File )<br></p> <p style="text-align:left;"></p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span> <div style="box-sizing:inherit;padding-left:0px;padding-right:0px;" class="story__details"> <div style="box-sizing:inherit;" class="ember-view"> <div style="box-sizing:inherit;" class="story__body"> <div style="box-sizing:inherit;" class="ember-view"> <div style="box-sizing:inherit;font-family:"open sans", "segoe ui", tahoma, sans-serif;font-size:18px;line-height:1.5;margin:0px auto 67px;width:800px;max-width:800px;" class="django-content"> <div style="box-sizing:inherit;"> <p style="box-sizing:inherit;line-height:1.5;">This past week, there has been an explosion of COVID-19 cases in Arizona. On Sunday, <a style="box-sizing:inherit;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(4, 141, 153);font-weight:600;" href="https://www.npr.org/sections/coronavirus-live-updates/2020/06/29/885067257/arizona-issues-new-shutdown-order-as-coronavirus-cases-spike" target="_blank">nearly 4,000 people</a> tested positive for the virus in the state, nearly double the number of cases reported the previous week.<br></p> <p style="box-sizing:inherit;line-height:1.5;">Since the crisis began, <a style="box-sizing:inherit;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(4, 141, 153);font-weight:600;" href="https://www.azdhs.gov/preparedness/epidemiology-disease-control/infectious-disease-epidemiology/covid-19/dashboards/index.php" target="_blank">nearly 75,000 people</a> have tested positive for the virus in Arizona and close to 1,600 people have died.</p> <p style="box-sizing:inherit;line-height:1.5;">Arizona is just one of the states that began to reopen businesses earlier than the <span style="box-sizing:inherit;">Centers for Disease Control and Prevention </span>recommended, only to see a surge in confirmed COVID-19 cases shortly thereafter. Similar spikes are being seen in California and Texas.</p> <p style="box-sizing:inherit;line-height:1.5;">On Monday, Arizona Governor Ducey announced the 30-day closure of bars, gyms, and other businesses.</p> <p style="box-sizing:inherit;line-height:1.5;">And as of today, more than 126,000 people have died overall in the U.S. from the pandemic.</p> <p style="box-sizing:inherit;line-height:1.5;"> <span style="box-sizing:inherit;font-weight:600;">Dr. Frank LoVecchio</span> is a professor of Emergency Medicine at the University of Arizona in Phoenix, and he joins The Takeaway to discuss what he is seeing, and how health care workers are reacting to the crisis.</p> <p style="box-sizing:inherit;line-height:1.5;">Check out our ongoing coverage of the COVID-19 pandemic <a style="box-sizing:inherit;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(4, 141, 153);font-weight:600;" href="https://www.wnycstudios.org/podcasts/takeaway/projects/covid-19-ongoing-coverage-coronavirus-outbreak" target="_blank"><em style="box-sizing:inherit;">here</em></a>. </p> <p style="box-sizing:inherit;line-height:1.5;">Click on the 'Listen' button above to hear this segment. Don't have time to listen right now? Subscribe for free to our podcast <a style="box-sizing:inherit;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(4, 141, 153);font-weight:600;" href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-takeaway/id363143310?mt=2" target="_blank">via iTunes</a>, <a style="box-sizing:inherit;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(4, 141, 153);font-weight:600;" target="_blank" href="https://tunein.com/radio/The-Takeaway-p150731/">TuneIn</a>, <a style="box-sizing:inherit;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(4, 141, 153);font-weight:600;" target="_blank" href="https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-takeaway">Stitcher</a>, or wherever you get your podcasts to take this segment with you on the go.</p> <p style="box-sizing:inherit;line-height:1.5;"> <em style="box-sizing:inherit;">Want to comment on this story? Share your thoughts on our <a style="box-sizing:inherit;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(4, 141, 153);font-weight:600;" target="_blank" href="https://www.facebook.com/thetakeaway">Facebook page</a>, <a style="box-sizing:inherit;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(4, 141, 153);font-weight:600;" href="https://twitter.com/TheTakeaway" target="_blank">Twitter</a>, or<span style="box-sizing:inherit;"> </span><a style="box-sizing:inherit;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(4, 141, 153);font-weight:600;" href="http://instagram.com/thetakeaway" target="_blank">Instagram</a>.</em> </p> <div> <em style="box-sizing:inherit;"> <br> </em> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div style="box-sizing:inherit;font-family:"open sans", "segoe ui", tahoma, sans-serif;max-width:850px;padding:0px;margin:0px auto;font-size:18px;line-height:1.5;" class="story-credits ember-view"> <div style="box-sizing:inherit;" class="story-credits__appearance-credits"></div> <div style="box-sizing:inherit;margin-top:30px;" class="story-credits__producing-org-credits producing-org-credits">​<br></div> </div> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span> <p style="text-align:left;"> <br> </p> <p> <br> </p> </html></div>2020-06-30T07:00:00ZUA
The Classic ‘Chicken-or-Egg’ Question Comes to CancerThe Classic ‘Chicken-or-Egg’ Question Comes to Cancer<div class="ExternalClassF962247EB86845EB90EF51B399640A55"><html> <p style="text-align:center;">​<span style="font-family:miloweb, -apple-system, blinkmacsystemfont, "segoe ui", roboto, "helvetica neue", arial, "noto sans", sans-serif, "apple color emoji", "segoe ui emoji", "segoe ui symbol", "noto color emoji";font-size:12px;">Melissa Herbst-Kralovetz, PhD</span><br></p> <p style="text-align:left;"></p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span>Can Bacteria be Harnessed to Defend Against Disease?<br>Unanswered questions swirl around the microbiome — habitats in our bodies that diverse species of bacteria call home. Scientists are only just starting to scratch the surface of how these bacteria interact with our unique body chemistries to influence our health. One of those scientists is Melissa Herbst-Kralovetz, PhD, associate professor of Basic Medical Sciences and Obstetrics/Gynecology at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix, director of the Women’s Health Microbiome Initiative, and member of the UArizona Cancer Center, who says the riddles posed by the vaginal microbiome captivated her early in her career.<br>Paweł Łaniewski, PhD, and Melissa Herbst-Kralovetz, PhD, Dip into Their Cell Supply, Which is Stored at −80° Celsius<br>“At first, I wanted nothing to do with it, because it was too difficult to model,” she recalled. “Then you get hooked on it and you’re like, ‘I need to learn more!’ It’s really complex, but really fun, too.”<br>Today, from her lab on the Phoenix Biomedical Campus in downtown Phoenix, Dr. Herbst-Kralovetz leads a team of researchers who are working to better understand how to predict, prevent and treat gynecologic cancers.<br>Bad Bugs and Gynecologic Cancer<br>One of the microbiome’s many mysteries involves the single-celled version of the eternal question: What came first, the chicken or the egg? In the Herbst-Kralovetz Lab, that question is more like: What came first, the cancer or the bugs? It’s a deceptively complex question, and the answer can tell us if we can prevent certain types of cancer or simply predict them — and gets to the heart of one of the most important concepts in science: causation.<br>Research coming out of the Herbst-Kralovetz Lab and across the world is pointing to similar conclusions: that there are “good” vaginal bacteria that are associated with health, and “bad” bacteria that are associated with diseases like cancer. But are these “bad” bacteria causing cancer, or are they simply bystanders?<br>“Association versus causation is a major issue in the field,” Dr. Herbst-Kralovetz said. “These bacteria are in the specimens we collect, but the big question is, are they influencing carcinogenesis? Were they there the whole time or do they favor this new environment?”<br>Dr. Herbst-Kralovetz has conducted studies examining the vaginal microbiomes of women with and without cervical cancer — which is caused by a virus that is usually cleared by the immune system but can sometimes persist, leading to cancer. It turns out that “good” bacteria called lactobacilli are associated with cervical health, while “bad” bugs like Sneathia and other anaerobic bacteria are associated with the persistence of the viral infection and possibly the development of cervical cancer. Her lab has begun uncovering interesting associations between the vaginal microbiome and endometrial cancer related to pH. More optimal microbiomes are dominated by lactobacilli, which lower the vaginal pH by releasing lactic acid.<br>“Our studies are really preliminary right now, but we’ve seen a significant difference in the vaginal pH between women with and without endometrial cancer, which is a really low-tech way to look at the vaginal community,” Dr. Herbst-Kralovetz said. “When you have a depletion of lactobacilli, you have an overgrowth of these bad bacteria. Then you increase your pH.”<br>“Good” Vaginal Bacteria, Shown Here in Green Inhabiting the Vaginal Tissue, Appear to Support Women’s Health, while “Bad” Bacteria, Shown Here in Red, are Associated with Disease<br>Her lab is conducting the largest study in history to investigate the connection between the vaginal microbiome and endometrial cancer. When the results are in, she hopes to shed light on whether any particular species of bacteria might be associated with the development of endometrial cancer.<br>“We’ve really tried to make our studies stand apart from others. Right now, we have 200 specimens. Other studies have collected 30 or 40 samples,” Dr. Herbst-Kralovetz said. “It’s taking time because I wanted to be thorough.”<br>Drivers and Passengers<br>Dr. Herbst-Kralovetz talks of cancer progression as a journey with a beginning and an end. We don’t know if the “bad” cancer-associated bacteria are along for the ride — or if they’re in the driver’s seat on the road to cancer. If Sneathia or another bug is shown to be behind the wheel, potential therapeutic interventions could be developed to target the cancer early — and force a U-turn. Scientists also would be able to devise powerful new strategies for cancer prevention by figuring out how to kill the bad bugs and replace them with beneficial bugs.<br>Bustling with Activity, the Herbst-Kralovetz Lab is Focused on Solving Complex Problems in Women’s Health<br>“If these bacteria are drivers of carcinogenesis, blocking them would make sense,” Dr. Herbst-Kralovetz said. “Figuring out how to reinstate beneficial bacteria also would be really important.”<br>But if the so-called bad bugs are in the passenger’s seat, they might just be sitting there quietly, hoping to get to their destination: a cancerous environment where they can thrive. Once they get there, they might proliferate wildly, obscuring the actual drivers from view. If a bug is a passenger rather than a driver, targeting it for destruction wouldn’t help — but its presence could be a sign that the body is on the road to cancer.<br>“Using them as a potential biomarker could give us an early prediction of cancer,” Dr. Herbst-Kralovetz said. “We could intervene before cancer occurs.”<br>Improving Cancer Survivorship<br>Once someone has cancer, however, it’s too late to prevent or predict it. But even at this point, solving the mysteries of the microbiome can still help improve survival and quality of life.<br>To prevent Contamination with Other Bacteria, Dr. Herbst-Kralovetz Sterilizes Her Tools with an Open Gas Flame<br>Immunotherapy, a cancer treatment that trains the immune system to attack cancer cells, might be affected by the composition of the vaginal microbiome. Studies of the gut microbiome show that patients who respond to immunotherapy have different populations of bacteria, which might be boosting the treatment’s effectiveness — and experiments in mice show that a fecal transplant from a responder to a non-responder can enhance the transplant recipient’s response to immunotherapy. But those studies are in the gut, not the vagina, and in mice, not humans. Scientists are a long way from figuring out if altering the vaginal microbiome might work hand in hand with immunotherapy to defeat cancer.<br>There also is compelling evidence that radiation and chemotherapy can throw the microbiome out of balance — and that an off-kilter microbiome somehow interferes with these treatments, making them less effective and more toxic.<br>“We think these therapies probably alter the vaginal microenvironment, especially if you’re getting pelvic radiation for gynecologic cancer,” Dr. Herbst-Kralovetz said. “But we don’t have any data yet.”<br>That lack of data means that, so far, there isn’t a recipe to create synthetic microbial cocktails of “good” bacteria that might boost cancer treatments’ effectiveness and blunt their negative side effects.<br>It can take a lifetime to untangle even one of the connections between myriad species of vaginal bacteria, several types of gynecologic cancer and countless other variables. Dr. Herbst-Kralovetz says she is up to the task, because for her, this riddle isn’t just a mesmerizing brainteaser — the answers she finds will benefit anyone at risk for gynecologic cancer.<br>The story originally appeared on University of Arizona Health Sciences' website and was written by Anna Christensen, MPH.​<span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span><p style="text-align:left;"><br></p></html></div>https://biomedicalphoenix.com/Lists/News/Attachments/63/herbst-kralovetz-uahs-header.jpg2020-06-17T07:00:00ZUA
Reinventing Medical Residencies During COVID-19Reinventing Medical Residencies During COVID-19<div class="ExternalClassA5CE3AC77C75409E85F211BA9FC54CEC"><html> <p style="text-align:center;"><span style="font-size:14.6667px;"></span><span style="font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14.6667px;">By </span><a style="color:rgb(26, 133, 181);font-weight:bold;font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;" href="https://kjzz.org/staff/400" target="_blank"><span style="font-size:14.6667px;">Nicholas Gerbis</span></a><span style="font-size:14.6667px;">​</span><span style="font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;background-color:window;color:windowtext;display:inline-block;text-align:justify;vertical-align:bottom;width:83px;height:20px;"></span><span style="text-align:left;font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;color:rgb(102, 102, 102);font-size:2em;background-color:window;">​​</span><img style="font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;color:windowtext;border-width:0px;border-style:initial;text-align:right;background-color:window;max-width:100%;margin:5px;width:0px;" class="file-icon" alt="Audio icon" title="audio/mpeg" src="https://kjzz.org/modules/file/icons/audio-x-generic.png" /><span style="font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;color:windowtext;text-align:right;background-color:window;"> </span><span style="font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;text-align:right;background-color:window;cursor:pointer;font-weight:bold;color:rgb(54, 184, 243);">Download mp3</span><span style="font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;color:windowtext;text-align:right;background-color:window;"> </span><span style="font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;color:windowtext;text-align:right;background-color:window;" class="file-size">(1.04 MB)</span></p><div><div class="panel-separator" style="margin:0px 0px 0em;font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"></div><div class="panel-pane pane-custom pane-4 node-body no-title block" style="margin-bottom:0px;border-top:none;clear:both;padding-top:20px;font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"><div class="block-inner clearfix" style="zoom:1;margin-left:10px;margin-right:10px;"><div class="block-content"><p style="margin:0px 0px 1.5em;">Coronavirus has profoundly changed how we educate and employ a whole cohort of students — including the next generation of doctors seeking residencies.</p><p style="margin:0px 0px 1.5em;">Medical residencies train students in prospective specialties. Applying for them involves a stressful and pricey process.</p><p style="margin:0px 0px 1.5em;">Students know distinguishing themselves on board exams or during rotations can help them stand out and acquire letters of recommendation. By curtailing such activities, COVID-19 injects even more uncertainty into an often perplexing process.</p><p style="margin:0px 0px 1.5em;">To cope, medical schools are considering deferring certain requirements and shifting key deadlines.</p><p style="margin:0px 0px 1.5em;">Dr. Cheryl O'Malley, associate dean of graduate medical education at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix, says the Coalition on Physician Accountability has recommended against traveling for rotations and in-person visits.</p><p style="margin:0px 0px 1.5em;">"That's really creating a significant change in the usual processes for consideration of programs on the medical student's side and also consideration of applicants on the program side," she said.</p><p style="margin:0px 0px 1.5em;">In-person visits and interviews provide an essential chance for students and programs to find out if they're a good match. But they also represent a sizable share of applicants' considerable travel expenses — costs some can better afford than others.</p><p style="margin:0px 0px 1.5em;">"By having the interviews and visits be virtual, it does level the playing field," said O'Malley.</p><p style="margin:0px 0px 1.5em;">Virtual interviews and visits also make more efficient use of another resource doctors and med students have in short supply: time.</p><p style="margin:0px 0px 1.5em;">But some experts worry students, now more uncertain than ever about how programs will evaluate them, might apply for even more residencies. That could worsen an already troubling trend of application inflation.</p><p style="margin:0px 0px 1.5em;">"There's been a lot of creative discussion about how to approach that in a way that doesn't limit choice, but that really eliminates some of the waste," said O'Malley.</p><p style="margin:0px 0px 1.5em;">Some solutions inspired by current conditions might prove effective enough to keep.</p><p style="margin:0px 0px 1.5em;">For example, if programs evaluated students more holistically and were less bound to formulas, applicants might obsess less about hitting every requirement or deferring exams.</p><p style="margin:0px 0px 1.5em;">O'Malley said the medical school has been moving towards more a holistic approach, but it presents substantial challenges.</p><p style="margin:0px 0px 1.5em;">"We can look at their academic performance; you can look at activities and research that they've participated in. And some of those are really hard to put numbers behind," she said.</p><p style="margin:0px 0px 1.5em;">O'Malley also emphasized the importance of interpersonal skills and finding the right fit. Remote interviews could support those types of evaluations.​<br></p></div></div></div></div><span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span><p style="text-align:left;"><span style="font-size:14.6667px;"><br></span></p> </html></div>2020-06-15T07:00:00ZUA
3 Arizona startups compete in international bioscience competition3 Arizona startups compete in international bioscience competition<div class="ExternalClassDE7643A1236E4FB483C2BE385E6995EF"><html> <p>​​</p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;">Pamela Turbeville only has six minutes to pitch a product she spent six years working on. </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;">If her pitch is successful, she could land meetings with big-name investors at one of the largest bioscience conferences globally.</span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;text-align:center;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <em style="box-sizing:border-box;">By Amanda Morris for The Arizona Republic</em> </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;">She is one of 30 finalists competing at this year's Bio International Startup Stadium contest, which helps to launch early-stage bioscience companies.</span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;">In this year's virtual competition, judges will review six-minute pitch videos submitted by each finalist and select several winners.</span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;">Each competitor must be a small bioscience startup that has less than 20 employees. The idea, said Nareg Sagherian, a Bio International managing director, is to spotlight promising young companies that might otherwise be overlooked at a large international conference.</span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;">Read the full story at <a href="https://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/arizona-science/2020/06/11/three-arizona-startups-compete-international-bioscience-competition-covid/5324319002/" target="_blank" style="color:rgb(32, 173, 149);background:transparent;font-family:hind, sans-serif;transition:all 0.2s ease-in-out 0s;box-sizing:border-box;">AZCentral​</a>​</span> </div> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span> <p> <br> </p> </html></div>https://biomedicalphoenix.com/Lists/News/Attachments/54/NEWSROOM_CED_0075.jpg2020-06-11T07:00:00ZPhoenix Bio News
Listen to Phoenix Leaders Share Insights about the Rising Bioindustry in the Nation’s 5th Largest City Listen to Phoenix Leaders Share Insights about the Rising Bioindustry in the Nation’s 5th Largest City <div class="ExternalClass85477EA12D3E483194E93A2800419195"><html> Listen to conversations with Phoenix Mayor Kate Gallego and other leaders as they share their insights with Tom Osha, Senior Vice President of Innovation and Economic Development at Wexford Science+Technology, about Phoenix’s growing and thriving bioindustry ecosystem.<br><br>Listen to these conversations beginning June 8, 2020 <a target="_blank" href="https://wexfordscitech.com/thecommons/"><strong><em>here</em></strong></a>:<br><ul><li><strong>Episode 1 –</strong> <em>The Role of Innovation Districts in Restarting the Economy</em><br></li><li><strong>Episode 2 </strong>– <em>Arizona’s Life Sciences Roadmap</em><br></li><li><strong>Episode 3 </strong>– <em>Phoenix is HOT! And so is the Phoenix Biomedical Campus</em></li><li><strong>Episode 4 </strong>– <em>ASU #1 for Innovation</em></li><li><strong>Episode </strong><strong>5 </strong>– <em>A Fertile Environment for Start-Ups: The OncoMyx Story</em></li><li><strong>Episode </strong><strong>6 </strong>– <em>Building the Life Sciences Workforce</em></li><li><strong>Episode </strong><strong>7 </strong>– <em>The Wexford Knowledge Community</em></li></ul>Sparking collaboration is the purpose of the Phoenix bioindustry ecosystem. Phoenix, Arizona, where each day is a relentless pursuit of cures. From discovery to delivery, join Phoenix companies and the leading edge of personalized medicine. Come to a young, vibrant community in an environment where ideas thrive. With a lack of barriers to enter the market, America’s fastest-growing population, and an entrepreneurial pioneer spirit, this is the place for rising to success. Join Translational Genomics Research Institute, three research universities, and world class bioscientists on the Phoenix Biomedical Campus. Located in dynamic Downtown Phoenix, home to Wexford Science and Technology’s collaboration-designed bioscience research building, the Center for Entrepreneurial Innovation, and unlimited opportunities. Learn more at <a target="_blank" href="/"><strong>www.biomedicalphoenix.com</strong></a> and <a target="_blank" href="https://www.phoenix.gov/econdev/bio"><strong>www.phoenix.gov/econdev/bio</strong> </a> <p> <br> </p> </html></div>2020-06-05T07:00:00ZWexford
Three Phoenix Startups to Compete on BIO International World StageThree Phoenix Startups to Compete on BIO International World Stage<div class="ExternalClass545019A208DD486DB24BA73FA8872060"><html> <p>​​<span style="font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;background-color:window;color:windowtext;">“Think about the thousands and thousands of bioscience startups around the world. Then out of all those companies located in hundreds of different global cities, only 30 have been selected as the best to compete in the Startup Stadium,” said Christine Mackay, director, Phoenix Community and Economic Development. “Of those 30 companies, three are from the city of Phoenix. That is an incredible accomplishment for the three companies and the Phoenix bioscience ecosystem.”</span></p> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;text-align:center;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;text-align:center;"> <em style="box-sizing:border-box;">By Eric Jay Toll for PHXNewsroom. Athena Sanchez contributed to this story</em> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;"></span> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;">BioMedical Sustainable Elastic Electronic Devices</span>​​<span style="box-sizing:border-box;"></span>, Equus Innovations and i-calQ will face off in front of an international panel of judges in a “Shark Tank” competition of bioscience startups in competition for venture capital, strategic partnerships and collaborative opportunities at the BIO International 2020 Startup Stadium, June 8-12, 2020.  This year’s event will be virtual. </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">Phoenix-based Humabiologics, a Phoenix Startup Stadium finalist from last year’s competition, closed a $1 million seed money investment deal in May.<br style="box-sizing:border-box;"><br style="box-sizing:border-box;"></div> <span style="font-weight:700;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:17.3333px;">BMSEED to Provide Traumatic Brain Injury Repair Technology to U.S. Army</span> <span style="font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"></span> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">​With an estimated 2.5 million Americans suffering a Traumatic Brain Injury each year, Oliver Graudejus turned a research project that he worked on at Princeton University into a groundbreaking biotechnology achievement today.<br style="box-sizing:border-box;"></div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <img src="https://www.phoenix.gov/econdevsite/MediaAssets/Other/NEWSROOM_CED_0067.jpg" style="border-width:0px;border-style:initial;width:495px;max-width:100%;box-sizing:border-box;margin:5px;" class="" />Graudejus, founder and CEO of BioMedical Sustainable Elastic Electronic Devices, headquartered in Phoenix, Arizona, said that the company’s long-term goal is go to market with a “neuromodulation” brain implant that a patient’s body will not recognize as a foreign object, and therefore won’t reject it. The innovation landed BMSEED its first customer, the U.S. Army.<br style="box-sizing:border-box;"></div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">BMSEED’s technological advance is a more effective manner of sending electrical impulses to the brain to treat the symptoms of TBI. “Neuromodulation” is the name for the electronic impulse technique that helps repair and reverse TBI and other brain diseases.</div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">“BMSEED’s quest to help treat traumatic brain injuries brings both a solution and hope for affected individuals and their loved ones,” said Phoenix Mayor Kate Gallego. “They are a great example of the many vibrant startups that have made Phoenix home.“</div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">BMSEED’s first product is a research tool that helps researchers develop treatments to mitigate the damage after a traumatic brain injury. This product, called the MicroElectrode Array Stretching Stimulating and Recording Equipment, or “MEASSuRE,” is urgently needed because all of the 30 clinical trials to develop treatments for traumatic brain injury over the past 25 years have failed, according to professor Barclay Morrison III, director of the Neurotrauma and Repair Laboratory at the Biomedical Engineering Department at Columbia University, New York City. </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">“The product reproduces the biomechanical environment of cells during the injury, and our stretchable electrodes allow the assessment of cell health and function,” Graudejus said. “That’s where BMSEED technology comes in, making soft, flexible and stretchable electrodes. The next step is to use these electrodes inside the body, with the goal that the body doesn’t see the device as a foreign object and try to reject it.” </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">Mackay says that the discoveries by Phoenix bioscience companies seem like medical practices from a futuristic science fiction movie.</div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">“Phoenix and our partners have invested hundreds of millions of dollars into building a bioscience ecosystem,” she said. “It took patience, strong partnerships like GateWay Community College, and today we see the results of relentless pursuits of cures.”</div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">BMSEED is headquarters in the Center for Entrepreneurial Innovation at GateWay Community College on East Washington Street.</div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="font-weight:700;box-sizing:border-box;font-size:17.3333px;">Turning Smartphones into Diagnostic Labs; i-calQ has an App for that</span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">For mom and dad, an early-morning “I don’t feel good” from one of the kids while scrambling to get ready for work often means a calendar-clogging wait with other sick patients at the doctor’s office. While major medical incidents still need the office call, the Covid-19 pandemic has increased the use of telemedicine.</div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">Telemedicine provides opportunities for patients and medical providers to converse face-to-face. One of the challenges facing telemedicine is the inability to conduct remote lab tests.</div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">A biotechnology discovery by Phoenix-based i-calQ could change that. Though home testing is not yet approved, someday mom or dad may be able to perfume basic tests at home and send the test results from their mobile phone right to the pharmacy, where a prescription can be processed and perhaps delivered home by drone.</div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">“That’s just where my brain went when I started thinking about all the ways we could help people with this type of technology,” said Pamela J. Turbeville, CEO and founder of the Phoenix, Arizona, U.S.-based startup. “Long-term, you remove the need to go to urgent care and getting exposed to other sick people who are carrying a variety of different things. This will also protect your family with whom you live.”</div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">The immediate use is bringing remote areas of the world direct access to high technology laboratories. Routine tests can save children’s lives with expedited results. The i-calQ device works in any setting where there is internet access without the need for costly local laboratory and testing infrastructure.</div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">“The importance of high-quality telemedicine has perhaps never been greater than it is now during Covid-19,” said Mayor Kate Gallego. “This technology can truly help revolutionize how we interact with healthcare providers. I-calQ is a true testament to the diverse innovation ecosystem housed in our city.”</div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">i-calQ, headquartered at Grand Canyon University’s Canyon Ventures incubator, is another example of the innovation and creativity coming from Phoenix startups, says Mackay. She points out that GCU’s rent-free program for startups helps spread bioscience collaboration across the city.</div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">“Watching how the i-calQ device went from a concept to a marketable product with life-saving possibilities is typical of the kinds of innovation Phoenix and our partners are supporting,” Mackay said. “Seeing the bioscience work from our desert recognized by the international scientific community is something special.”</div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="font-weight:700;box-sizing:border-box;">Horses Need Advanced Healthcare Too</span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">Find a problem and solve it. That’s what drives bioscience entrepreneurs. And Grant Senner MD, DABRM, CEO of Equus Innovations in Phoenix, believes that it’s time to move solutions for equine health and performance into the marketplace.</div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">“We’re taking century-old human medical science, applying current bioscience techniques, and using it as a next-generation clinical option for use in horses,” said Grant Senner MD, DABRM and CEO of Equus Innovations. “We saw a critical need (in equine health care) for a highly (effective), cost-effective, off-the-shelf product to bring truly regenerative medicine to this field.”<br style="box-sizing:border-box;"></div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">Equus Innovations, a Phoenix, Arizona, U.S. startup, has the first product of its kind on the market.  RenoV¬¬ō is an acellular, liquid allograft comprised of amnion and amniotic fluid intended to cover and protect tissues. An allograft is a tissue transplant from one, in this case, horse to another horse.  </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">“Ranching and agriculture are engrained in Arizona’s economic and cultural traditions. Horses have played a key role in that history,” said Mayor Kate Gallego. “Equus Innovations shows just how much can come from looking at existing technology with fresh eyes to create new solutions.” </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">RenoVō, used in treatments for more than 2,000 horses, is enjoying rapid adoption among owners and veterinarians as the preferred alternative to other clinical options. </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">Senner said that with the support from the city of Phoenix and GateWay Community College’s Center for Entrepreneurial Innovation, Equus Innovations is “an entrepreneurial success story.”</div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">“Equus is an example of the companies the Phoenix innovation ecosystem is generating, and not just in human health solutions,” said Mackay. “We are recognized as a city where it doesn’t matter how long your roots have been in the Valley. Phoenix is the place where discoveries are welcome, and collaboration is a routine way of life.”</div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="font-weight:700;box-sizing:border-box;">Innovation and Collaboration Build Phoenix’s Global Reputation in Bioscience Discovery</span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <img src="https://www.phoenix.gov/econdevsite/MediaAssets/Other/NEWSROOM_CED_0071.jpg" style="border-width:0px;border-style:initial;width:495px;max-width:100%;box-sizing:border-box;margin:5px;" class="" />The Center for Entrepreneurial Innovation at GateWay Community College is expanding from its East Washington Street origin into the new 850 North Fifth Street building under development by Wexford Science + Technology. CEI attracts the emerging bioscience companies for incubation and acceleration.  The collaboration between tenant companies propels each forward from discovery to delivery. CEI is a major player in the Phoenix innovation ecosystem.</div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">The city of Phoenix has America’s fastest population growth for the fourth year in a row. Phoenix is the anchor of the Phoenix-Mesa-Chandler, metropolitan area, which in 2019 passed Boston-Cambridge Newton Massachusetts and New Hampshire, to become the 10th most populous U.S. metropolitan area. The city and its partners have invested more than $500 million into development of the Downtown Phoenix Biomedical Campus. </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">The doubling in size of the Mayo Clinic campus with the Arizona State University Health Solutions Campus in northeast Phoenix is nearly a $1 billion investment. Bioscience and healthcare organizations in the city of Phoenix are in the process of investing more than $3 billion into 4.6 million square feet of new primary research and treatment facilities. Including Mayo Clinic and ASU, there are more than $1.3 billion in facilities under construction today.<br style="box-sizing:border-box;"></div> <div> <br>​<br></div> <p> <br> </p> </html></div>https://biomedicalphoenix.com/Lists/News/Attachments/52/NEWSROOM_CED_0070.jpg2020-06-01T07:00:00ZCity of Phoenix
Repair for Traumatic Brain Injury Coming Now from Phoenix-Based Startup BMSEEDRepair for Traumatic Brain Injury Coming Now from Phoenix-Based Startup BMSEED<div class="ExternalClassEBF69601CE5B4284864CA4344A3B80D6"><html> <p>​<span style="font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;background-color:window;color:windowtext;">“</span><span style="font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;background-color:window;color:windowtext;">It was the pivotal moment,” said Oliver Graudejus. It was 2007, and he was sitting in a workshop at the University of Michigan. In what seems a lifetime ago, Graudejus watched a demonstration of neuromodulation change a Parkinson’s Disease patient’s life from unlivable to near-normal.</span></p> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;text-align:center;"> <em style="box-sizing:border-box;">By Eric Jay Toll and Athena Sanchez for PhxNewsroom</em> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <img class="" style="border-width:0px;border-style:initial;width:150px;max-width:100%;box-sizing:border-box;margin:5px;vertical-align:baseline;float:right;height:210px;" alt="Photo, Oliver Graudejus, Founder and CEO, BMSEED" src="https://www.phoenix.gov/econdevsite/MediaAssets/Other/NEWSROOM_CED_0066.jpg" />It wasn’t that devices at that time were technological “iron lungs,” but some were inconvenient for daily patient life. It’s the belief there was a better way. That was the eureka moment for Graudejus, founder and CEO of BioMedical Sustainable Elastic Electronic Devices, headquartered in Phoenix, Arizona, U.S. He was determined to invent a more effective manner of pushing electrical pulses to a patient’s brain-implanted stimulator. </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">Neuromodulation is a technique that addresses one of the most profound challenges in the medical profession, how to repair and reverse the consequences of traumatic brain injuries and other brain diseases. TBI is one of the leading causes of death and disability among children and young adults in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control. </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">BMSEED is one of three Phoenix companies to be selected to compete globally in the Bio International organization’s 2020 Startup Stadium. The Stadium selects 30 startups from hundreds of applicants around the world to compete for venture capital, strategic partnerships and customers in early June. This is the second year in the row three startups from Phoenix made it to the final round. Last year, more than 16,000 people attended the Bio International conference, where the Phoenix companies competed. This year the conference is virtual.</div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">“BMSEED’s quest to help treat traumatic brain injuries brings both a solution and hope for affected individuals and their loved ones,” said Phoenix Mayor Kate Gallego. “They are a great example of the many vibrant startups that have made Phoenix home.“</div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">An estimated 2.5 million Americans each year suffer a TBI.  Over a quarter million are hospitalized and survive, but often with overwhelming physical and mental impairment. This is all about biomimetic technology, fooling the body’s immune system not to recognize the device as a foreign object, which makes it far more effective and sustainable for human use.</div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">“BMSEED’s first product is a research tool that helps researchers develop treatments to mitigate the damage after a traumatic brain injury. This product, called the MicroElectrode Array Stretching Stimulating und Recording Equipment, called “MEASSuRE”, is urgently needed because all of the 30 clinical trials to develop treatments for traumatic brain injury over the past 25 years have failed. </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">The product reproduces the biomechanical environment of cells during the injury, and our stretchable electrodes allow the assessment of cell health and function,” Graudejus said. “That’s where BMSEED technology comes in, making soft, flexible and stretchable electrodes. The next step is to use these electrodes inside the body, with the goal that the body doesn’t see the device as a foreign object and try to reject it.” Neural interface technology faces the fundamental challenge of the body’s reaction to expel foreign objects. </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">Previous generations of biotech interfaces between the devices and the human body have resulted in cumbersome hard-material electrodes and uncomfortably large external devices that the body tries to reject. This is the problem that our electrodes could help solve.</div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> “It’s important working and collaborating with people who aren’t like-minded,” he said. “Failing to do so may result in something you think is good, but it may not be relevant for anybody.”</div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <img class="" style="border-width:0px;border-style:initial;width:125px;max-width:100%;box-sizing:border-box;margin:5px;vertical-align:baseline;float:right;height:175px;" alt="Barclay Morrison III, PhD" src="https://www.phoenix.gov/econdevsite/MediaAssets/Other/NEWSROOM_CED_0068.jpg" />BMSEED collaborates with professor Barclay Morrison III’s Neurotrauma and Repair Laboratory at the Biomedical Engineering Department at Columbia University, New York City. </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> “This profound need for improvements in the prevention and treatment of TBI is the driving force behind our research,” said Barclay Morrison III, PhD, professor of biomedical engineering, Columbia University, New York. Dr. Morrison leads the Neurotrauma and Repair Laboratory at the university. “Our long-term goal is to understand the consequences of mechanical forces on the most complex system of the human body, the brain.” </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> BMSEED’s development of smaller, softer and thinner electrodes is a new generation of technology creating flexible implants. Made from a proprietary micro-cracked gold film embedded between two layers of silicone, Graudejus developed the core principle from 2006 to 2009 while working at Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey.</div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">“The MEASSure system will provide researchers with a valuable new tool for mechanically stimulating cells while recording electrophysiological activity,” said Dr. Morrison. “Those capabilities open up a world of novel studies that weren't possible before.”</div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> “I wanted to do something with the rest of my life that was going to have an impact,” said Graudejus. “The very different challenge from the technical issues that we have to overcome is there's always more you can do to a product to improve. I would say that's our biggest challenge.”</div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">Getting the company name out there is another challenge BMSEED is facing. Already its product is at a stage adequate to sell to the prototype to its first commercial customer, the United States Army. Being on the virtual Startup Stadium stage will help overcome this challenge, with thousands of bioscience professionals being exposed to the company.</div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">Sales, marketing and growing to scale are the biggest funding needs BMSEED faces, according to the CEO. Non-dilutive funding from foundations and the National Institute of Health paid for development costs. The company has raised nearly $3 million from the two sources. </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">“Some improvements on intellectual property, a proper manufacturing facility along with the sales and marketing, this is what we need to fund now,” he said. “With development costs covered by others, we believe this is an attractive opportunity for investors.”</div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">Graudejus said that they’d had excellent success with his team working in the laboratory at the Gateway College Center for Entrepreneurial Innovation. The pandemic has created some challenges with the CEO working at home and other team members dividing time between the CEI lab and home-based work environments.</div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">“I’m grateful to my team for keeping the work going,” he said.</div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">CEI, which is developing its second location in Downtown Phoenix, is part of the Phoenix Bioscience Ecosystem and is another milestone on the Flinn Foundation Arizona Bioscience Roadmap. </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;">Phoenix is America’s fifth-largest with the most population growth of any U.S. city for the last four years. The city has invested over $500 million with its partners into the downtown Phoenix Biomedical Campus. The city has also invested millions into the Arizona Health Solutions campus of Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University. Public and private bioscience and healthcare organizations are committing more than $3 billion to develop 4.6 million square feet of new facilities in the city of Phoenix. The Phoenix-Mesa-Chandler metro area is the tenth most populous in the U.S., having passed the Boston-Cambridge-Newton Massachusetts-New Hampshire metro area in 2019.<br style="box-sizing:border-box;"></div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <img class="" style="border-width:0px;border-style:initial;width:495px;max-width:100%;box-sizing:border-box;margin:5px;" src="https://www.phoenix.gov/econdevsite/MediaAssets/Other/NEWSROOM_CED_0069.jpg" /> <br> <br> </div> <p> <br> <br> </p> </html></div>https://biomedicalphoenix.com/Lists/News/Attachments/49/BMSEED.jpg2020-05-28T07:00:00ZCity of Phoenix
Phoenix Startup i-calQ Turns Smartphones into Diagnostic LabsPhoenix Startup i-calQ Turns Smartphones into Diagnostic Labs<div class="ExternalClass668C3EA565FA4A5F8D03FD05F8BA1658"><html> <p><span style="color:windowtext;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;background-color:window;">K</span><span style="color:windowtext;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;background-color:window;">evin is complaining about a sore throat, and his mother is concerned it might be strep throat. It’s a moment that could mean staying home from work and hauling Kevin to urgent care or waiting to see a doctor. It used to mean that, but someday there could be a home test for that.</span><br></p> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;text-align:center;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <em style="box-sizing:border-box;">By Eric Jay Toll and Athena Sanchez for PhxNewsroom</em> </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;">Though a home test is not approved now, someday Kevin’s mom may be able to send the test results from her smartphone and then head to the pharmacy for an antibiotic or ask for drone delivery.</span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;">“That’s just where my brain went when I started thinking about all the ways we could help people with this type of technology,” said Pamela J. Turbeville, CEO and founder of the Phoenix, Arizona, U.S.-based startup. “Long-term, you remove the need to go to urgent care and getting exposed to other sick people who are carrying a variety of different things. This will also protect your family with whom you live.”</span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;">Out of hundreds of startups from around the world, i-calQ is one of three from Phoenix, Arizona, U.S., to join 27 others in the 2020 BIO International Startup Stadium. The Stadium is a “Shark Tank” competition among the startups for venture capital, strategic partnerships and collaborative opportunities. BMSEED and Equus Innovations are the other Phoenix companies entering the competition in June.</span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;">“The importance of high-quality telemedicine has perhaps never been greater than it is now during Covid-19,” said Mayor Kate Gallego. “This technology can truly help revolutionize how we interact with healthcare providers. I-calQ is a true testament to the diverse innovation ecosystem housed in our city.”</span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;">Six years and millions of dollars later, the platform functions well with both iOS and Android mobile operating systems. </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;">“Even when issues were needing to be corrected, we never doubted that we would get the test platform to where it needed to be,” said Turbeville. “The combination of people we could help and the impact we could have on the community was the focus.”</span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;">The CEO calls herself a “Phoenix kid just trying to make the world a better place.” She’s a fourth-generation Arizona native and is a part of a family of cowboys. Turbeville has worked all over the United States and Canada but returned to her Arizona roots to find the ecosystem to make her idea a reality.</span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;">i-calQ technology opens the world to rapid medical testing. In developed nations, the application means time- and money-saving convenience. In the developing world, it means access to testing and diagnostics in places where the infrastructure of laboratories and technicians are not readily available. Test results return in about ten minutes, and treatments can start immediately.</span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;">“i-calQ’s Covid-19 test is awaiting approval and then can be used on the spot to test students to get back to class, employees to go back to work, safely,” Turbeville said. “Similarly, the thyroid-stimulating hormone test will allow testing babies in remote areas where there aren’t facilities.”</span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;">She says that this technology is among the first steps for bringing down the overall cost of medicine in the U.S. and opening access across the world.</span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;">Like many startups, Turbeville is ready to launch the product to market. The company is seeking working capital to scale up.</span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;">Seven patents are already in the house, “a lot for a startup,” according to Turbeville. Once launched, i-calQ could be reducing test-result delays and getting patients to treatment more quickly.</span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;">The CEO calls it a “platform for change.”</span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;">“We can test for COVID-19 now and, if we know what the next global pandemic will be, we can plan for it,” she said. “This wasn’t our original charter, but the company has developed this capability.”</span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;">“The net result is that i-calQ will make a difference in the lives of many people by saving lives and improving the quality of individual life,” Turbeville said. </span> </div> <p> <br> </p> </html></div>2020-05-28T07:00:00ZPhoenix Bio News
Bio and life science discoveries are helping more than just peopleBio and life science discoveries are helping more than just people<div class="ExternalClassFC5F973143A6470CA3E5C1C4EA2B7C59"><html> <p>​<span style="font-size:13.3333px;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;background-color:window;color:windowtext;">“We’re taking century-old human medical science, applying current bioscience techniques, and using it as a next-generation clinical option for use in horses,” said Grant Senner MD, DABRM and CEO of Equus Innovations. “We saw a critical need (in equine health care) for a highly efficacious, cost-effective, off-the-shelf product to bring truly regenerative medicine to this field.”</span></p> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;text-align:center;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;text-align:center;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <em style="box-sizing:border-box;">By Eric Jay Toll and Athena Sanchez for PHXNewsroom</em> </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;">Senner and his co-founder, COO and Chief Scientific Officer, Christian Beaudry, saw a need to bring regenerative medicine to the equine world. They found the opportunity to take existing technologies and successfully apply them to the emerging branch of veterinary science.</span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;">Equus is one of three Phoenix companies selected to join 27 others selected from among hundreds of startups around the world to compete in the Biotechnology Innovation Organization’s 2020 International Startup Stadium. The BIO International Startup Stadium is a “Shark Tank” of bioscience startups presenting to a global panel of judges in hopes of winning venture capital, strategic partnerships and product collaborations.</span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;">Equus Innovations, a Phoenix, Arizona, U.S. startup, has the first product of its kind on the market.  RenoVō is an acellular, liquid allograft comprised of amnion and amniotic fluid intended to cover and protect tissues. An allograft is a tissue transplant from one, in this case, horse to another horse.  </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;">Donor tissues harmlessly collected with owner consent during live birth do not harm the mare or foal. Amniotic birth tissues are rich sources of bioactive factors involved in tissue regeneration with reported anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial and anti-fibrotic properties. RenoVō is cryopreserved and maintained frozen before use, to preserve beneficial proteins. </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;">“Our mission is to create and provide innovative products to maximize the health and performance of horses across all breeds and athletic disciplines,” said Senner. “We are the market leader in the development of novel, advanced allografts for veterinary use.”</span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <img class="" style="border-width:0px;border-style:initial;width:495px;max-width:100%;box-sizing:border-box;margin:5px;" src="https://www.phoenix.gov/econdevsite/MediaAssets/Other/NEWSROOM_CED_0071.jpg" />RenoVō, used in treatments for more than 2,000 horses, is enjoying rapid adoption among owners and veterinarians as the preferred alternative to other clinical options. </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;">“Ranching and agriculture are engrained in Arizona’s economic and cultural traditions. Horses have played a key role in that history,” said Mayor Kate Gallego. “Equus Innovations shows just how much can come from looking at existing technology with fresh eyes to create new solutions.” </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;">As with all good entrepreneurial ventures, the identification of the problem is step one. Equus Innovations saw that a highly effective and strong regenerative medicine component, and the solution for equine use, was glaringly absent from the market.</span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;">“That was the driver behind the creation of the company,” Senner said. “(Our) team has really dedicated itself and devoted the time, energy and financial resources into advancing the clinical data. We have a first-of-its-kind field study in over 200 horses, evaluating the product in soft tissue and orthopedic injuries in equine subjects.”</span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;">Senner sees the results of the clinical research, and getting that information into the marketplace, as the key for even greater adoption of RenoVō. Equus works closely with its sister company and national distributor, Equine Amnio Solutions, located in Argyle, Texas. The company’s near-term focus includes leveraging ongoing studies with the research and development program, and to continue the dialogue for a strategic partnership with larger operators seeking innovative products for veterinary use.</span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;">Senner is a multiple-startup entrepreneur of companies in the biotechnology sector. Equus Innovations is his first foray into veterinary sciences.</span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;">“Veterinarians in this sector are just a delight to work with. They’re a different group of clinicians than my MD counterparts on the human health side,” Senner said. “I find them very scientifically driven. They have a very healthy and balanced skepticism. They’re to be admired for their dedication to the animals and putting the patient health above all else.”</span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;">Senner said that with the support from the city of Phoenix and GateWay Community College’s Center for Entrepreneurial Innovation, Equus Innovations is “an entrepreneurial success story.”</span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;">Phoenix is America’s fifth-largest city with the most population growth of any U.S. city for the last four years. The city has invested over $500 million with its partners into the downtown Phoenix Biomedical Campus. The city has also invested millions into the Arizona Health Solutions campus of Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University. Public and private bioscience and healthcare organizations are committing more than $3 billion to develop 4.6 million square feet of new facilities in the city of Phoenix. The Phoenix-Mesa-Chandler metro area is the tenth most populous in the U.S., having passed the Boston-Cambridge-Newton Massachusetts-New Hampshire metro area in 2019.</span> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:16px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:13.3333px;"> <img class="" style="border-width:0px;border-style:initial;width:495px;max-width:100%;box-sizing:border-box;margin:5px;" src="https://www.phoenix.gov/econdevsite/MediaAssets/Other/NEWSROOM_CED_0073.jpg" />​</span> </div> <p> <br> </p> </html></div>https://biomedicalphoenix.com/Lists/News/Attachments/51/NEWSROOM_CED_0072.jpg2020-05-28T07:00:00ZCity of Phoenix
Biotech - Finding the DNA for Success Biotech - Finding the DNA for Success <div class="ExternalClassA04CEEE475A54DA08E17ED0750C9D71F"><html> <p>​</p>According to Deloitte's 2020 Global Life Sciences Outlook, the biotech sector<br>is at an inflection point. To prepare for the future and remain relevant in<br>the ever- evolving business landscape, biopharma and medtech organizations<br>will be looking for new ways to create value and new metrics to make sense of<br>today's wealth of data, the report overview says.<br><br>As data- driven technologies provide biopharma and medtech organizations<br>with treasure troves of information, and automation takes over some mundane<br>tasks, new talent models are emerging based on purpose and meaning. The integration<br>of artificial intelligence (Al) and machine learning approaches within life sciences<br>is making drug discovery and development more innovative, time-effective<br>and cost- effective, the Deloitte report states.<br><br>Click <a target="_blank" href="/Documents/PHX%20BIO%20news%20in%20Business%20Facilities%20March_April%202020.pdf"><span style="color:rgb(0, 0, 139);"><strong>Here </strong></span></a>​To Read More.<br><p><br></p></html></div>2020-05-13T07:00:00ZPhoenix Bio News
An ASU researcher is working on a virus that's harmless to humans, but kills cancer cellsAn ASU researcher is working on a virus that's harmless to humans, but kills cancer cells<div class="ExternalClass2F5AA84CA8B245129FE95F9ED5606E45"><html> <p>​</p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span> <a href="https://www.azcentral.com/staff/2683965001/amanda-morris" target="_blank"> <strong> <em>Amanda Morris</em> </strong> </a> <strong> <em>, Arizona Republic</em> </strong> <br> <em>Published 4:00 p.m. MT May 10, 2020 | </em> <em> <strong>Updated 4:08 p.m. MT May 11, 2020</strong> </em>​<span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span><p><br></p><p>Grant McFadden has spent over two decades studying the myxoma virus.</p><p>The ASU virologist grew interested in the myxoma virus because it is extremely deadly in European rabbits but virtually harmless in non-rabbit hosts — including humans. He wanted to figure out why.</p><p>So he began testing its ability to infect lab-grown cells.</p><p>Along the way, he made a startling discovery.</p><p>"We accidentally stumbled upon the fact that if we take this virus and put it onto cancer cells … the virus treated them just like rabbit cells, it infected them, killed them, in a way that was really quite dramatic," McFadden said.</p><p>With those results, the idea to use the virus as a cancer treatment was born.  </p><p>After several successful experiments in mice, McFadden co-founded a company in June 2019 to develop the virus into a type of cancer treatment known as virotherapy.</p><p>The company, called OncoMyx, has raised over $25 million to perfect the virotherapy and get the data needed to get approval for clinical trials. Though the first human trials are a long way off — about two and half years away — OncoMyx CEO and co-founder Steve Potts believes the treatment has a lot of potential.</p><p>"We'll start by targeting the most promising and effective cancer treatments," Potts said. "My hope is that we have a significant impact on one or two cancers."<br><br></p><h2 style="text-align:center;">TESTS IN MICE SHOW PROMISE</h2><p>To test the virus' ability to treat cancer, McFadden injected the virus into micethat had an aggressive form of brain cancer called glioblastoma. </p><p>Glioblastoma typically has a poor survival rate; only 5% of patients survive more than five years. It is the same type of cancer Arizona Sen. John McCain battled before succumbing to it in 2018.</p><p>McFadden conducted his first test with two groups of mice infected with glioblastoma. The control mice weren't given the virus treatment. All of them died.</p><p>But the mice treated with the virus produced a dramatically different result: All of them survived.</p><p>The mice treated with the virus also had no traces of glioblastoma left in their bodies. </p><p>In this test, McFadden also injected healthy, cancer-free mice with the myxoma virus. All the healthy mice emerged unscathed, with no side effects, and were fine.</p><p>Since that first test, McFadden has tested the virus against about a dozen different cancers in mice so far, including lung and blood cancers.<br></p><p>A common misconception is that cancer is a single disease, but it is actually an umbrella to describe hundreds of different diseases that can be quite different from each other. Because of this, some types of cancer might respond differently to the myxoma virotherapy and need to be tested separately, according to McFadden.</p><p>“It's worked exceedingly well in everything we've tested," he said. “All of them have had results that vary from good to great."</p><p>These successes don't mean that this virus could be a "holy grail" for curing cancer. Just because the virotherapy seems so promising in mice doesn't mean the results will be as effective in human trials.</p><p>In studying the myxoma virus, ASU virologist Grant McFadden is infecting cells with the virus. Cells infected with the virus are shown in green.<br><br></p><h2 style="text-align:center;">HOW VIROTHERAPY WORKS</h2><p>The treatment works like this: First, a modified version of the myxoma virus is injected into a host with cancer.</p><p>Rather than using an unaltered, natural form of the myxoma virus, researchers at OncoMyx are working to change the genetics of the virus to make it even more aggressive and lethal against different forms of cancer. This also allows them to use different formulas to target certain cancers.</p><p>“Mother Nature has given us a virus that is pretty good at growing in cancer cells and killing cancer cells, but … what everyone wants to do is improve upon what Mother Nature has done," McFadden said.</p><p>Once injected, the virus will attack cancer cells, but it also has 80 genes that stimulate the human immune system, Potts said. This triggers a strong immune system response in which the body starts destroying both the virus itself and the nearby cancer cells. By genetically altering the virus, OncoMyx hopes to further strengthen that immune system response. </p><p>“We want to make our immune system respond more to the tumor than to the virus," Potts said.<br><span style="background-color:window;color:windowtext;font-family:inherit;font-size:10pt;"><br>Making the virotherapy stronger is also important because it's only a matter of time before the immune system is successful in flushing out the virus itself from the body. This means that when researchers administer the virotherapy, the virus will only stay in the body for a short time frame, and researchers want the treatment to be as effective as possible during that window.</span><br></p><p>To do this, they are adding additional genes to the virus that will further stimulate the immune system. Researchers have about 40 genes to work with.</p><p>Out of those 40 additional genes they could add to the virus, Potts said they will likely settle on adding only a few additional genes, although there are many different possible combinations. Re-engineering the virus to add or change its genetic makeup can take two or three months. For every additional genetic concoction OncoMyx makes, it takes another two to three months to test the new virotherapy. </p><p>In all, tweaking the virus to give it better ammunition against cancer and testing each new version can take up to six months.</p><p>McFadden said researchers are also investigating the best way to deliver the virus and how they can use the virotherapy to treat cancer hiding in hard-to-find places, such as when cancer has spread throughout a person's bone marrow.</p><p>Workers at Oncomyx are developing a new cancer treatment using a virus.<br><br><br></p><h2 style="text-align:center;">LONG ROAD TO HUMAN TRIALS</h2><p>Turning laboratory research into a new medicine or treatment takes a lot of time, money and effort.</p><p>That's where Skysong Innovations comes in. Skysong Innovations is a company that acts as a proxy for ASU to get funding and intellectual property rights for ASU research so that it can be marketed and applied in the real world. In McFadden's case, Skysong Innovations was instrumental in helping him get the funding needed for OncoMyx's research.</p><p>"Researchers cure cancer in mice all the time — but getting to the next step takes a lot more work," said Augustine V. Cheng, Skysong Innovations' CEO and chief legal officer.</p><p>For OncoMyx to start human trials, the company needs to submit an Initial New Drug Application to the Food and Drug Administration and get that application approved. The application needs to include a great deal of data from mice trials to prove that the product is reasonably safe for initial testing in humans.</p><p>Proving safety and effectiveness of the treatment is a high bar, meaning the company must spend the next year or two testing the virotherapy in mice and collecting data from those trials. Because each mouse trial takes at least eight weeks, each trial is also expensive.</p><p>"Yes, I would love all of this to be faster and cheaper but the truth is ultimately we have the obligation to be safe," McFadden said. “To prove safety is absolutely critical and it's not cheap, that's the bottom line."</p><p style="text-align:left;"><span style="background-color:window;color:windowtext;font-family:inherit;font-size:10pt;">In all, Potts determined that they would need at least $25 million to launch OncoMyx and complete the testing for the Initial New Drug Application.</span><br></p><p>To get the money, Potts and his fellow co-founders started raising funds in early 2018 and began pitching the treatment to investors around the world in a process that Potts called "Shark Tank for nerds," a reference to the popular television show.</p><p>In June 2019, with global investors from places like Hong Kong, OncoMyx succeeded in raising the full amount needed to start conducting mouse trials for the Initial New Drug Application.</p><p>If all goes well, Potts said the first phase of human trials would likely start in about two to three years.</p><p>This first phase would take a few months and, if it is a success, the company would start a second phase of human trials, which is a larger, longer-term study. This second phase would likely take another two to five years before the company could submit the virotherapy to the FDA for final approval as a treatment.</p><p>All together, this treatment could reach a commercial market in four to eight years. Any unsuccessful trials or other hiccups in the process could prolong the process.</p><p>Cheng believes this treatment is well worth the time and effort. </p><p>"Virotherapy is one of the hottest areas in cancer treatment right now," he said. "And nobody else is working with myxoma virus.</p><p>"This virus may end up curing many cancers." <br></p><p><br></p></html></div>2020-05-10T07:00:00ZOncoMyx Therapeutics
Phoenix’s CRE Transformation Pours $3B Into Biotech And ResearchPhoenix’s CRE Transformation Pours $3B Into Biotech And Research<div class="ExternalClassC89965F8DDC245DF99E1DA26CD6181F2"><html> <p>​The rare absence of both spring break and spring training tourists has changed Phoenix’s current focus.</p><p> Now, instead of tourism, city officials are shifting gears to the needs of the service and healthcare sectors, which have seen a boom in development and capital inflows.</p><p>“In a 24-month span, we have over $3B in current and proposed construction projects in the health services, hospital and medical research industries within the Phoenix city limits,” said Claudia Whitehead, a spokesperson for the city. </p><p>“These projects cover over 4.5M SF and will provide over 7,000 jobs. Our status as a ‘young’ big city means there are less boundaries in the medical field, and that opens the industry to collaboration and innovation," she said. "Most people do not associate Phoenix with cutting-edge medical technology, but we are hoping that changes this decade.” </p><p>In news that has not been shared with the general public, biotech company Caris Life Sciences, which has two commercial projects underdevelopment in Phoenix, will announce Tuesday a new artificial intelligence process being used to treat cancer. </p><p>Caris Life Sciences' Molecular Intelligence Folfox, which uses AI in oncology treatments, has earned breakthrough therapy designation from the Food and Drug Administration.  </p><p>Caris currently has two projects underway: a 45K SF lab addition scheduled to open in mid-April at The Cotton Center, Arizona’s largest business park; and a brand-new lab opening in late April in the First Solar building at 202 Highway and Mill Ave. </p><p>Both are prime examples of how CRE is advancing medical innovation across Phoenix.  </p><p>“Phoenix has become a hotbed for molecular diagnostics and attracting therapeutic companies,” Caris President David Spetzler said. “Since it is close to the airport, our Cotton Center location provides us perfect functionality to ship our specimens. The lack of natural disasters and lack of humidity makes Phoenix an ideal location to set up laboratories and the [commercial real estate] industry is definitely reaping the benefit.” </p><p>Central Phoenix and downtown Phoenix are both enjoying a research renaissance, as food and beverage chains give way to medical research and biotech buildings. </p><p>The Phoenix Biomedical Campus is a 30-acre site downtown that runs south to north from Van Buren Street to Garfield Street, and from east to west from Seventh Street to Fourth Street. The Translational Genomics Research Institute, a nonprofit medical research institute, was the foundation for the campus, and has been downtown for almost 15 years. Since then, 16 companies that came out of TGen have a commercial real estate presence in Phoenix.</p><p>The Phoenix Biomedical Campus is also home to the University of Arizona’s colleges of Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, Public Health, and Telemedicine, as well as Northern Arizona University’s College of Health and Human Services and four additional allied health programs. Arizona State University’s College of Health Solutions is also based on the campus, which has a partnership with Wexford Science & Technology. </p><p>Wexford Science & Technology's topping out ceremony to showcase Okland Construction's completion of the 226K SF Innovation Center at 850 North Fifth St., a partnership with Arizona State, was supposed to be held March 27. The coronavirus pandemic scuttled that plan, leading to a mass video distribution of the current construction site to the public. The project is now slated to be completed in late 2020.</p><p>“Finding a place in the Phoenix Biomedical Campus has been a priority for us, because of the environment for private and academic research collaboration,” Wexford Science & Technology Director of Development Kyle Jardine said. “The academic and medical communities have dropped their boundaries, so private companies feel free to join collaboration opportunities by expanding their office and laboratory presence.” </p><p>It is an expanding presence that will include Maricopa Community College as a tenant, along with over 100K SF over two floors that will be occupied by Arizona State. The fifth, sixth and seventh floors will be fully developed for private laboratories.<br></p><p>“The combination of affordable land and a ‘new’ big city open to innovation is why we see this as just the beginning phase for Phoenix as a medical research and resource destination,” Jardine said. </p><p>Traditional healthcare heavyweights, including Banner Health and the Mayo Clinic, are expanding their Phoenix-area facilities, too. Banner Health has one project in the southeast valley in Chandler and another in the northwest valley in Sun City. </p><p>Its newest hospital is planned to open in November 2020 in Chandler and is spread across 18 acres. The four-story Banner Ocotillo Medical Center will include a Level 2 emergency room as well as cardiology, gastroenterology, gynecology, labor and delivery, imaging, intensive care, orthopedic and surgical services. The building will contain 96 licensed beds and 24 observation beds with a staff of over 65 physicians and 430 full-time employees. </p><p>Exactly 50 miles away from Chandler in Sun City, Banner Health is in the middle of building a new $106M, six-story emergency room and patient tower at Banner Boswell Medical Center, scheduled to open this fall. The new emergency room increases space to 56 beds total, and increases annual patient capacity to 60,000 from 45,000. </p><p>“We are Arizona’s largest nonprofit healthcare system, so we are constantly evaluating the growing healthcare needs across the state, not just in Phoenix,” Banner Health spokesperson Nancy Neff said. “We have responded with expansions, new builds, new partnerships and mergers and acquisitions to meet those needs.” </p><p>Just within Phoenix city limits on the north side of the valley, the Mayo Clinic is undergoing perhaps the most visible project, right off the highly traveled Loop 101 freeway off the 56th Street exit. The Mayo Clinic’s expansion will add an additional 1.4M SF, almost doubling the size of the campus, in a $648M expansion project that is scheduled for completion by April 2023. </p><p>The project will include a new six-story patient tower, a new three-story building for an expanded emergency department, a three-floor addition to the current building and expanded parking. A Future Health Solutions campus, a 150K SF collaboration with Arizona State, is being created adjacent to the Mayo Clinic. </p><p>“We call the city of Phoenix the frontier of medical collaboration and innovation because both the newcomers and the longtime residents are choosing this opportunity to expand,” Whitehead said. </p><p>There are now over a dozen other healthcare or biotech projects under development in Phoenix, including Valleywise Health’s 673K SF medical center at 2601 East Roosevelt St. The 10-story medical center is located next to the current medical center and is scheduled to open in late 2023. </p><p>The new tower will increase instructional resources at the state’s only public teaching hospital, while making facility improvements to the Arizona Burn Center and the Level 1 Trauma Center. </p><p>“After the Great Recession of 2008, we decided as a city that we could not just be built on tourism and growth anymore,” City of Phoenix Community and Economic Development Manager Chris Mackay said. </p><p>“We made a conscious effort then to attract the healthcare and medical biosciences industries because they are resilient industries that thrive regardless of the state of the economy. That investment is starting to pay off during these unfortunate times, and hopefully these innovative research opportunities can be tomorrow’s solutions to today’s medical problems.”<br><br><br><br></p> </html></div>https://biomedicalphoenix.com/Lists/News/Attachments/30/CRE.jpg2020-03-30T07:00:00ZPhoenix Bio News
Paradigm Diagnostics Receives Expanded Medicare Coverage for PCDx for Solid TumorsParadigm Diagnostics Receives Expanded Medicare Coverage for PCDx for Solid Tumors<div class="ExternalClass1FCD6BE58B1E4A7DBAEBF0B993837251"><html> <p>​</p> <p> <em>Paradigm Diagnostics, Inc. announced that Palmetto GBA, the Medicare Administrative Contractor (MAC) for the Molecular Diagnostics MolDX program, has reviewed the technical dossier and broadly approved the Paradigm Cancer Diagnostic (PCDx) assay under the Local Coverage Determination for next-generation sequencing for solid tumors.</em> <br> </p> <p> <em>The PCDx test provides physicians and their patients with a blueprint of the underlying mechanisms of a patient's disease, potential treatment approaches, and inventory of relevant clinical trials. The test gets results back to physicians in three to five business days, rather than weeks.  The PCDx assay detects substitutions, insertion and deletion alterations (indels), and copy number alterations in 234 genes and select gene rearrangements. PCDx also detects genomic signatures, including micro satellite instability (MSI) and tumor mutational burden (TMB) using DNA isolated from formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tumor tissue specimens in addition to select immunohistochemistry tests.</em> </p> <p> <em>"After an extensive technical review, the expanded Medicare coverage significantly enhances Paradigm's ability to enable broader and earlier access to biomarker-driven treatments that may improve survival for cancer patients," said David Mallery, CEO.</em> <br> </p> <p> <strong>Source: </strong> <a target="_blank" href="https://www.paradigmdx.com/"> <strong>https://www.paradigmdx.com</strong> </a> <br> </p> <p> <br> </p> </html></div>https://biomedicalphoenix.com/Lists/News/Attachments/32/NEWSROOM-20200110-Paradigm-Diagnostics.jpg2020-01-10T07:00:00ZParadigm
OncoMyx Therapeutics Announces Formation of Scientific Advisory BoardOncoMyx Therapeutics Announces Formation of Scientific Advisory Board<div class="ExternalClass94C4A49E47434453B94BB0316470BAD5"><html> <p>​</p> <p> <a href="https://oncomyx.wpengine.com/" target="_blank">OncoMyx Therapeutics</a>, a privately-held oncolytic immunotherapy company, announced today the formation of its Scientific Advisory Board (SAB), comprised of experts in tumor immunology, oncology drug discovery and development, and oncolytic viruses. The SAB will work closely with the OncoMyx leadership team as the company advances a therapeutic pipeline of oncolytic immunotherapies based on the myxoma virus (MYXV) platform. The company's pipeline includes both monotherapies and therapies to be used in combination with immune checkpoint blockade and other immuno-modulatory approaches, offering significant therapeutic promise to a wide range of cancer targets.</p> <p>“This is a group of highly-accomplished scientists and drug hunters, some whom I have known for many years," said Leslie Sharp, Ph.D., chief scientific officer (CSO) of OncoMyx. “We are thrilled to welcome Tobias, Neil, Grant, Ronan, and Dominic to our SAB, and I look forward to working with the team to develop new therapeutic options for cancer patients."<br></p> <p> <img style="margin:5px;" class="" alt="portrait" src="https://s11759.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/oncomyx-potts.jpg" /> <br> </p> <p>“We are assembling a world-class team with deep expertise in developing and commercializing innovative therapeutics," said Steve Potts, Ph.D., MBA, founder and chief executive officer of OncoMyx. “Our SAB's collective strategic, scientific, and clinical experience, together with our existing team, will help transform OncoMyx into a high growth clinical-stage therapeutics company." Image: <em>OncoMyx Therapeutics</em><br></p> <p>The SAB will be comprised of the following members:</p> <p>Tobias Bald, Ph.D. is the Head of the Oncology and Cellular Immunology Laboratory at QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute. He is a leading expert in tumor immunology with a strong focus on the role of the innate immune system during tumor development, progression and cancer immunotherapy.</p> <p>Neil Gibson, Ph.D. is President and CEO of PDI Therapeutics and Senior Vice President of COI Pharmaceuticals. Dr. Gibson has more than 30 years of drug development experience and has been involved in the successful discovery, development and commercialization of four approved oncology drugs (including temozolomide, sorafenib, erlotnib, and crizotinib). Dr Gibson's extensive oncology experience includes being CSO of Pfizer Oncology Research Unit, CSO of Regulus Therapeutics and CSO of OSI Pharmaceuticals.  Dr. Gibson also serves on the board of TCR2, a new public company focused on T-cell therapies.<br></p> <p>Grant McFadden, Ph.D. is founder, research advisor, and director at OncoMyx. He is one of the top global leaders in oncolytic viruses with a specialization in pox viruses, including myxoma. The McFadden lab pioneered the field of viral immune subversion (also called “anti-immunology") and is credited with the discovery of a wide spectrum of virus-derived inhibitors of the immune system.<br></p> <p>Ronan O'Hagan, Ph.D. is Senior Vice President of Research and Translational Sciences at Akrevia Therapeutics. Prior to Akrevia, Ronan served as Executive Director, Oncology Discovery at Merck Research Laboratories. In this role he led the oncology discovery program at Merck with a particular emphasis on approaches to enable and enhance immune-modulatory therapies in cancer. Earlier at Merck, he led target identification and validation for oncology and generated an early-discovery pipeline including both biologics and small-molecule programs. He has helped to bring multiple small-molecule and biologics programs into clinical development during his time in industry. His academic career included undergraduate and graduate work in Canada followed by post-doctoral work at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI). In Dr. Ron DePinho's laboratory at DFCI, he focused on genetically engineered mouse models of cancer and novel approaches to target discovery.<br></p> <p>Dominic Spinella, Ph.D. has over 25 years of experience in drug research and development and the discipline of Translational Medicine. He has been an executive leader at Chugai Biopharmaceuticals USA, where he was Vice President of Exploratory Research; at Pfizer where he served as head of Translational Medicine for the Oncology division; and at Amgen where he was Executive Director of Medical Sciences and head of Biomarkers and Diagnostics. A former professor of Medicine and Immunology at the University of Tennessee College of Medicine and Howard Hughes postdoctoral fellow at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, he also served on several national and international cancer biomarker development bodies.<br></p> <p>​“We are assembling a world-class team with deep expertise in developing and commercializing innovative therapeutics," said Steve Potts, Ph.D., MBA, founder and chief executive officer of OncoMyx. “Our SAB's collective strategic, scientific, and clinical experience, together with our existing team, will help transform OncoMyx into a high growth clinical-stage therapeutics company."<br></p> <p> <br> </p> <p> <br> </p> </html></div>2020-01-09T07:00:00ZOncoMyx Therapeutics
NAU expands nursing programs to serve more studentsNAU expands nursing programs to serve more students<div class="ExternalClass7E688B24533D4CB4BC07B7E90929A1AF"><html> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span>Northern Arizona University is expanding its Bachelor of Science nursing program in Tucson to accept more students.<br>Arizona has a growing health care workforce shortage, which the university said is a driving force behind the expansion.<br>The need for nurses is expected to grow by about 15 percent by 2026, according to Dr. Pamela Stetina, director of nursing at NAU.<br>“We are looking at a potential nursing shortage, and the RN workforce — the registered nurse workforce — is expected to grow about 15 percent, and that was from 2016 to 2026,” Stetina said. “There is a need for nurses. That in and of itself will help Arizona. I think that nurses are paid relatively well, and I think there are always jobs for nurses.”​<span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span><p><br></p></html></div>https://biomedicalphoenix.com/Lists/News/Attachments/26/NAU Logo.png2019-11-27T07:00:00ZNAU
Phoenix Biomedical Campus — Transformation through the power of partnershipsPhoenix Biomedical Campus — Transformation through the power of partnerships<div class="ExternalClassC796E0BF5E9F4D3AB87ECD1EF0C08AA4"><html> <p style="text-align:center;"> <span style="font-size:8pt;">​<em>The University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix is housed in an architecture award-winning building in Downtown. Nothern Arizona University's Phoenix Health Science school is also located here. The Phoenix Biomedical Campus is located between Fifth and Seventh streets, and Monroe and Garfield streets, in Downtown Phoenix, Arizona. The campus has more than 1 million square feet of education and research facilities and houses the global headquarters of Translational Genomics Research Institute, an affiliate of the City of Hope, Wexford Science+Technology 850 North Fifth innovation campus, and Arizona State University College of Nursing and Health Innovation.<br></em><span style="background-color:window;color:windowtext;font-family:inherit;">Image: City of Phoenix<br></span><em style="color:windowtext;font-family:inherit;background-color:window;text-align:left;">By Karrin Taylor Robson for Chamber Business News</em></span> </p> <p style="text-align:left;"> <span style="font-size:8pt;"> <em style="color:windowtext;font-family:inherit;background-color:window;text-align:left;">​</em> </span> </p> <p></p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;"> <div class="ExternalClass3B5EFA5F7C0C43919A64D9A55C6DB520" style="box-sizing:border-box;"> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">Individually, Arizona’s public universities are among the most innovative, entrepreneurial and visionary in the country.</span> </p> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;"> <figure style="margin:0px;box-sizing:border-box;"> <img src="https://www.phoenix.gov/econdevsite/MediaAssets/People/UPDATE-20191114-Karen-Taylor-Robson-ABOR_Portrait.jpg" alt="Photo, Karrin Taylor Robson" style="border-width:0px;border-style:initial;width:222px;max-width:100%;box-sizing:border-box;float:left;vertical-align:baseline;margin:5px;" class="" /> <figcaption style="box-sizing:border-box;"> <em style="box-sizing:border-box;">Karrin Taylor Robson is a native Arizonan, attorney and business leader. She is the founder and president of Arizona Strategies, a land-use strategy firm in Phoenix. Robson was appointed to the Arizona Board of Regents in 2017.</em> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;">Image: Arizona Board of Regents</figcaption> </figure> </div>​<span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">Together, they are an unstoppable force fo​r student success, economic growth and cutting-edge research capable of solving society’s greatest challenges.</span><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">​The Phoenix Biomedical Campus is a crown jewel in downtown Phoenix and a leading catalyst in transforming our community into a nationally renowned hub of research, discovery and economic development. It is also a shining example of the power of partnerships through collaboration among the Arizona Board of Regents (ABOR), Arizona’s public universities, the City of Phoenix and private sector partners.</span><br style="box-sizing:border-box;"><br style="box-sizing:border-box;"></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">This state-of-the-art medical and bioscience facility in the heart of downtown Phoenix was established in 2004 in partnership with ABOR, Arizona State University, Northern Arizona University, the University of Arizona and the City of Phoenix.</span>​</p></div> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;float:none;height:20px;"></div> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="font-weight:700;box-sizing:border-box;">Source: <a href="https://chamberbusinessnews.com/2019/11/13/opinion-phoenix-biomedical-campus-transformation-through-the-power-of-partnerships/" target="_blank" style="color:rgb(32, 173, 149);text-decoration-line:underline;background:transparent;font-family:hind, sans-serif;transition:all 0.2s ease-in-out 0s;outline:0px;box-sizing:border-box;">https://chamberbusinessnews.com/2019/11/13/opinion-phoenix-biomedical-campus-transformation-through-the-power-of-partnerships/</a>​</span> </p> <p style="text-align:left;"> <span style="font-size:8pt;"> <em style="color:windowtext;font-family:inherit;background-color:window;text-align:left;"> <br> </em> </span> </p> </html></div>https://biomedicalphoenix.com/Lists/News/Attachments/34/PBC-20191028-UA-Medical-School-04.jpg2019-11-14T07:00:00ZPhoenix Bio News
7,000 Phoenix jobs coming from $3B city bioscience investment7,000 Phoenix jobs coming from $3B city bioscience investment<div class="ExternalClass3F19350421A6424C8A2B821BC47E87CB"><html> <p>​<span style="font-size:15px;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif;background-color:window;color:windowtext;">I</span><span style="font-size:15px;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif;background-color:window;color:windowtext;">t </span><span style="font-size:15px;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif;background-color:window;color:windowtext;">all starte</span><span style="font-size:15px;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif;background-color:window;color:windowtext;">d with a vision nearly 20 years ago. Phoenix City Council committed to develop a 30-acre Downtown city-owned site into the Phoenix Biomedical Campus.</span></p> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:15px;">“When the City Council approved a nearly $100 million investment in the Phoenix Biomedical Campus, I don’t believe anyone even dreamt about the impact it would have on the Valley,” said Christine Mackay, director, Phoenix Community and Economic Development. “The council believed there would be great economic benefit downtown, but I don’t think they foresaw the amount of development that would be built in every corner of the city.”</span> <span style="font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;"></span> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"></p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">Mackay points from her office window on the 20th floor of City Hall towards the building purchased from Phoenix by City of Hope and its affiliate, Translational Genomics Research Institute, more commonly called, TGen and to the towering crane for the under-construction innovation campus by Wexford Science + Technology.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"></p> <figure style="margin:0px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;"> <img src="https://www.phoenix.gov/econdevsite/MediaAssets/MACK-20180315-Mackay-Chris-250p.jpg" alt="Photo, Christine Mackay" align="right" style="border-width:0px;border-style:initial;width:250px;max-width:100%;box-sizing:border-box;margin:5px;" class="" /> </figure> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:15px;">“We have over 9,500 people whose jobs are generated by the Phoenix Biomedical Campus today,” said Mackay.</span> <p> <br> </p> </html></div>https://biomedicalphoenix.com/Lists/News/Attachments/28/PBC logo.png2019-10-21T07:00:00ZCity of Phoenix
​​​​​ ​The Economy Update​ 7,000 Phoenix jobs coming from $3B city bioscience investment​​​​​ ​The Economy Update​ 7,000 Phoenix jobs coming from $3B city bioscience investment<div class="ExternalClass4BCE5D26FDFA4BB69A769B02F2CCE7AE"><html>​<figure style="margin:0px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;"><figcaption style="box-sizing:border-box;"><div style="box-sizing:border-box;text-align:center;"><em style="box-sizing:border-box;">Wexford Science+Technology is under construction with its innovation campus at 850 N. Fifth st., Downtown Phoenix</em><br style="box-sizing:border-box;">Image: HKS</div><br style="box-sizing:border-box;"><div style="box-sizing:border-box;text-align:center;"><em style="box-sizing:border-box;">By Eric Jay Toll for The Economy Update</em></div></figcaption></figure><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">It all started with a vision nearly 20 years ago. Phoenix City Council committed to develop a 30-acre Downtown city-owned site into the Phoenix Biomedical Campus.</span></p><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:15px;">“When the City Council approved a nearly $100 million investment in the Phoenix Biomedical Campus, I don’t believe anyone even dreamt about the impact it would have on the Valley,” said Christine Mackay, director, Phoenix Community and Economic Development. “The council believed there would be great economic benefit downtown, but I don’t think they foresaw the amount of development that would be built in every corner of the city.”</span><span style="font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;"></span><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">Mackay points from her office window on the 20th floor of City Hall towards the building purchased from Phoenix by City of Hope and its affiliate, Translational Genomics Research Institute, more commonly called, TGen and to the towering crane for the under-construction innovation campus by Wexford Science + Technology.</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"></p><figure style="margin:0px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;"><img class="" style="border-width:0px;border-style:initial;width:250px;max-width:100%;box-sizing:border-box;margin:5px;" align="right" alt="Photo, Christine Mackay" src="https://www.phoenix.gov/econdevsite/MediaAssets/MACK-20180315-Mackay-Chris-250p.jpg" /></figure><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:15px;">“We have over 9,500 people whose jobs are generated by the Phoenix Biomedical Campus today,” said Mackay.</span><span style="font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;"></span><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"></p><h2 style="margin:3px 0px 10px;font-weight:700;color:rgb(0, 0, 0);font-size:28px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:montserrat, "open sans", sans-serif !important;line-height:28px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;">Early vision to grow Phoenix as national bioscience center</h2><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">“This all started with an early vision to put a stake in the ground for city of Phoenix in the biosciences,” said Sharon Harper, president and CEO of Plaza Companies, and a Flinn Foundation board member. “The intent was that companies would be connected. That early thinking is part of what attracted TGen to Phoenix.”</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">It was a major catalyst for the city when TGen planted its flag in Phoenix. The organization has a story about how it ended up choosing the city; see <a style="color:rgb(32, 173, 149);background:transparent;font-family:hind, sans-serif;transition:all 0.2s ease-in-out 0s;box-sizing:border-box;" href="https://www.phoenix.gov/econdev/inthenews/658#JohnMcCain" target="_blank">sidebar</a>​ at the end of the article.</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">Since 2002, the city and its partners have invested more than $500 million in the Phoenix Biomedical Campus. The original $100 million investment, which resulted in the TGen building in 2004, is now dwarfed by more than $3 billion throughout the city by private, institutional, and university capital investment that will take place over the next two years. Nearly $1 billion of that investment is already under construction.</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><img class="" style="border-width:0px;border-style:initial;width:300px;max-width:100%;box-sizing:border-box;margin:5px;" align="right" alt="Photo, Sharon Harper" src="https://www.phoenix.gov/econdevsite/MediaAssets/People/PEOPLE%2020191008%20Harper%20Sharon.jpg" />​<span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">The city will be looking at more than 4 million square feet of new <a style="color:rgb(32, 173, 149);background:transparent;font-family:hind, sans-serif;transition:all 0.2s ease-in-out 0s;box-sizing:border-box;" href="https://www.phoenix.gov/econdev/inthenews/658#pipeline" target="_blank">bioscience and healthcare facilities</a> when the last of the proposed developments are delivered to market. There will be more than 7,000 new jobs to fill with an annual payroll of almost one-half billion dollars. “Phoenix recognized that biosciences could not evolve without support from higher education. The city-education partnership now results in collaboration with 10 universities, medical schools and community colleges for research, development, patents and degrees,” said Mackay.</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">Today, city of Phoenix is globally-recognized for its bioscience achievements “We’ve hit a critical mass in Phoenix,” said Harper. “We have the research, we have the platform, and we have world-class universities, researchers and hospitals. Add to that the new Creighton University School of Medicine and Health Sciences–Phoenix in Midtown. It all ties together.”</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">The $3 billion for city of Phoenix development doesn’t count another more than $1 billion in facilities being constructed elsewhere in the Valley.</span></p><figure style="margin:0px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;"><img class="" style="border-width:0px;border-style:initial;width:1069.13px;max-width:100%;box-sizing:border-box;margin:5px;" alt="Rendering, architects interpretation of final design for Creighton University" src="https://www.phoenix.gov/econdevsite/MediaAssets/Buildings/UPDATE-20191001-FINAL-Creighton-University.jpg" /><figcaption style="box-sizing:border-box;"><div style="box-sizing:border-box;text-align:center;"><em style="box-sizing:border-box;">: Rendering of Creighton University Health Sciences -- Phoenix Campus, at Park Central Mall, on North Central Avenue, in Medtown, part of Midtown Phoenix, Arizona.</em><br style="box-sizing:border-box;">Image: Creighton University</div></figcaption></figure><h2 style="margin:3px 0px 10px;font-weight:700;color:rgb(0, 0, 0);font-size:28px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:montserrat, "open sans", sans-serif !important;line-height:28px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;">Biosciences strengthen the overall Phoenix economy</h2><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">The growing strength of the bioscience and healthcare sectors in city of Phoenix is more muscle in economic diversity of the greater Phoenix area, according to Chris Camacho, president and CEO of the Greater Phoenix Economic Council.</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"></p><figure style="margin:0px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;"><img class="" style="border-width:0px;border-style:initial;width:300px;max-width:100%;box-sizing:border-box;margin:5px;" align="right" alt="Photo, Chris Camacho" src="https://www.phoenix.gov/econdevsite/MediaAssets/People/Chris%20Camacho_Greater%20Phoenix%20Economic%20Council.jpg" /></figure><span style="font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;">​</span><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:15px;">“Biosciences bring us high wage jobs but also the number and type of supply chain businesses increase. This insulates a growth economy like greater Phoenix with base industrial jobs,” he said. “We’ve hit a unique nexus. We have a unique market for clinical trials because of the diverse population and variety of places from which our residents arrive. We have a unique level of collaboration between our companies not seen in other markets. We have strong engineering talent for manufacturing, production and prototyping.”</span><span style="font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;"></span><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">Camacho says that these unique characteristics make city of Phoenix a highly competitive biosciences market, even more so than its attractive cost of doing business. Those in private sector see even more reasons why Phoenix is a bioscience proving ground.</span></p><h2 style="margin:3px 0px 10px;font-weight:700;color:rgb(0, 0, 0);font-size:28px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:montserrat, "open sans", sans-serif !important;line-height:28px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;">Surprise! Phoenix is now a global bioscience site and career center</h2><span style="font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;">​</span><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">“There are three reasons life-sciences are growing significantly in Phoenix,” Yelton said, current Past Chair of AZBio, Chair of the Flinn Foundation’s Bioscience Entrepreneurship Program and former CEO of Pinnacle Transplant Technologies. “First, the business environment in Arizona and Phoenix. We have a low cost of doing business, customized laboratory spaces and a clustering of Tier I and Tier II life science companies.”</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"></p><figure style="margin:0px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;"><img class="" style="border-width:0px;border-style:initial;width:300px;max-width:100%;box-sizing:border-box;margin:5px;" align="right" alt="Photo, Russ Yelton" src="https://www.phoenix.gov/econdevsite/MediaAssets/People/PEOPLE%2020191005%20Yelton%20Russ.jpg" /></figure><span style="font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;">​</span><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:15px;">Part of that business environment, according to Yelton, is the educational institutions in city of Phoenix.</span><span style="font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;"></span><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">“The higher education system, both the universities and community colleges, are all graduating a well-educated workforce,” he said. “They are also accelerating opportunities with new technologies from the universities and programs like the (Center for Entrepreneurial Innovation) at Gateway, which is bringing its new LabForce Program Downtown to the Wexford building.”</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">Yelton said the second reason bio- and life-sciences are so strong in Phoenix is the growth of angel investors supporting startups.</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">“Desert Angels is now one of the most active angel groups in the country,” said Yelton. “Their growth is one of the appeals to other non-Valley-based venture capital groups.”</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">Yelton’s number three on the list is the life-sciences workforce.</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">“From Flagstaff to Tucson, higher education institutions and even some high schools, are working to excite and train the life-science workforce,” he said. “Hiring in a booming economy is a challenge, but we’re creating the workforce to fill the jobs that are coming.”</span></p><h2 style="margin:3px 0px 10px;font-weight:700;color:rgb(0, 0, 0);font-size:28px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:montserrat, "open sans", sans-serif !important;line-height:28px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;">Attracting risk capital</h2><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">City of Phoenix is a center of excellence in 3Ds of bioscience—the discovery, development and delivery—of health science solutions. This is a result of collaboration and partnerships between the city, the five Phoenix-located university campuses, TGen, AZBio and a growing community of bioscience entrepreneurs, called “biopreneurs.”</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><img class="" style="border-width:0px;border-style:initial;width:300px;max-width:100%;box-sizing:border-box;margin:5px;" align="right" alt="Photo, Tammy McLeod" src="https://www.phoenix.gov/econdevsite/MediaAssets/People/PEOPLE%2020191008%20McLeod%20Tammy.jpg" /><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">It’s attracting the attention of risk capital.</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">“We invited five risk capital investors to talk with Phoenix biopreneurs during 2019 Bioscience Week,” said Tammy McLeod, president and CEO of the Flinn Foundation, a leader in promoting life sciences in Arizona. “We had two from Arizona, and three others from New York, Chicago and Philadelphia.”</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">McLeod and Yelton both said that the New York investor told them that she had not realized the depth of Arizona life science efforts and planned to return to talk with growth-stage biopreneurs.</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">The “deep coaching” efforts, as described by McLeod, are examples of how the city’s investment in biosciences and healthcare are leveraged for greater returns. She said 45 companies participated in the risk capital track.</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">Phoenix-based companies are starting to attract serious attention from risk capital investors. Kalos Therapeutics is one of a handful of companies invited to pitch East Coast investment firms this fall. The invitation comes on the heels of Kalos’ presentation at Startup Stadium during the 2019 Bio International Conference. Three Phoenix companies were among 40 selected to present in June.</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">“We’re recognizing that life science startups and growth-stage companies are facing different challenges than pure tech companies,” said McLeod. “Where tech companies talk about digital challenges, biopreneurs are looking for nuts and bolts help in dealing with the (Food and Drug Administration) and best practices associated with getting from research into production.”</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">The Phoenix Bioscience Healthcare Strategic Initiative combines multiple strategies and coordinates efforts with private and public partners.</span></p><h2 style="margin:3px 0px 10px;font-weight:700;color:rgb(0, 0, 0);font-size:28px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:montserrat, "open sans", sans-serif !important;line-height:28px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;">Phoenix is collaboration</h2><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">“Openness, collaboration and speed to market. This is what people are discovering in Phoenix,” said Camacho.</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">Collaboration. That word keeps coming up in conversation after conversation about biosciences in the city.</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">“Dr. (Jeffrey) Trent (founding president and director of TGen) brought the word “collaboration” to Phoenix,” said Harper. “He extended Phoenix’s reach to global proportions by collaborating with bioscientists around the world.”</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">Today, TGen has its headquarters in city of Phoenix and a facility in Flagstaff.</span></p><h2 style="margin:3px 0px 10px;font-weight:700;color:rgb(0, 0, 0);font-size:28px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:montserrat, "open sans", sans-serif !important;line-height:28px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;">The ‘new frontier’ in personalized medicine</h2><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">“Phoenix is the new frontier of personalized medicine,” said Harper. “The strength of collaboration, the quality of the workforce, it’s a sum that is greater than the whole.”</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">Harper said there’s another big attraction to city of Phoenix for a company looking for a location or a researcher or scientist seeking a place to grow their career.</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">“We can pick up the phone and reach the mayor, the governor, the presidents of universities, and they are available to talk with companies,” she said. “This is an unprecedented level of access, and it’s something that’s very impressive when a company is looking at the city or Arizona.”</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">After nearly 20 years of global collaboration, it’s become a fact that if there are cures for cancer, some component of that research most likely has a root in city of Phoenix.</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">In Phoenix, the bioscience healthcare collaboration means that solutions can rapidly move from discovery to delivery.</span></p><h2 style="margin:3px 0px 10px;font-weight:700;color:rgb(0, 0, 0);font-size:28px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:montserrat, "open sans", sans-serif !important;line-height:28px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;">City provides business hiring and individual training support in bioscience healthcare</h2><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">Companies find the city of Phoenix labor pool to be ready to take on scientific and technical positions.</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">“Currently, we have a quality experienced workforce growing with graduates from high quality programs at ASU, UA, NAU and (Grand Canyon University),” Camacho said. “Companies tell me that they view Phoenix as having one the most attractive labor pools in the U.S.”</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">Five of the Maricopa Community Colleges are offering bioscience healthcare programs, Camacho said. “They are getting our science and health technicians the credentials and licenses needed for many of the new jobs,” he added.</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">He also pointed out the quality education found in places like Phoenix Bioscience High School, a Phoenix public school.</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">“Students get real-world experience from companies in an applied learning experience,” Camacho said. “This is what we see as a future for education in the area.”</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">Readying the labor pool is a collaborative effort for the city of Phoenix. With 7,000 new jobs hiring in the next two years, The city’s Arizona@Work–Phoenix and the Phoenix Business and Workforce Development Center are positioned to help companies hire and prepare candidates for these opportunities.</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">“The biosciences often require specialized workforce training, and the Business and Workforce Development Center is prepared to help a company find its workers,” said Robert Stenson, BWDC supervisor. “City of Phoenix partners with companies to train incumbents and help companies succeed with their existing and new staff.”</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">Training programs custom designed by the city for its businesses can be for new hires or to advance skills of existing employees.</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">Stenson said that the bioscience and healthcare strategy of training incumbents helps keep people relevant to their jobs in a growing company. The Phoenix BWDC helps companies of all sizes with recruitment, hiring, training and retention.</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">“It’s an agile process,” he said. “As a company moves from its formation stage into its growth stage, it’s important to retain its employees by training them to remain relevant. If the workforce doesn’t grow with the company, it can hurt the entire organization.”</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">On the other side of the equation are workers who may want to advance skills or change careers to take advantage of the new jobs and opportunities. With thousands of new bioscience and healthcare jobs in the pipeline, there are a lot of opportunities for all skill levels.</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">“Arizona@Work–Phoenix helps match skills and career goals with jobs that are in demand today,” said Stan Flowers, workforce program manager. “We provide career solutions. Someone who wants to move into a bioscience or healthcare career will find that city of Phoenix helps offset training costs to attain a certificate or credential needed for the positions.”</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">Flowers said that an interested candidate would participate in a career readiness program to analyze whether such a career goals are aligned with individual expectations and skills. After this step, Phoenix can place the candidate into the appropriate training program.</span></p><h2 style="margin:3px 0px 10px;font-weight:700;color:rgb(0, 0, 0);font-size:28px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:montserrat, "open sans", sans-serif !important;line-height:28px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;">City Council to continue its economic development vision for biosciences</h2><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">Oct. 8, the City Council heard an update about the scope of services, commitments and efforts city of Phoenix powers up in bioscience healthcare. The Council is being asked to continue evolving vision growing this sector. Jobs in bioscience healthcare have been solid contributors to the city’s economic growth.</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">According to the Arizona Office of Economic Opportunity and U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data, bioscience and healthcare employment was the only industry sector in the Phoenix metro that continually showed job gains during the recession. Bioscience healthcare hiring has increased every year since 2007 and skyrocketed over the past five years. As of August 2019, more than 500,000 people worked in bioscience healthcare in the metro, compared to 280,000 before the recession. The city of Phoenix Bioscience Healthcare Strategic Initiative is a key council policy program that continually proves its contributions to the Valley over the two decades since it was first envisioned. Following the Oct. 8 Policy Committee presentation, the Council will schedule a vote to continue funding one of its most successful economic development programs.</span>​​</p><div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;text-align:center;"><h1 style="margin:0px 0px 20px;font-weight:700;font-size:36px;letter-spacing:-1px;line-height:24px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:montserrat, "open sans", sans-serif !important;color:rgb(0, 0, 0) !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;">Major bioscience, research and healthcare facilities in the pipeline</h1></div><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">These bioscience and healthcare organizations already have major improvements in the pipeline that when added together, top $3 billion. Major projects by Arizona State and Creighton universities, Banner Health and Mayo Clinic, and Wexford Science + Technology are already under construction to the tune of nearly one-third of the total projected capital investment.</span></p><ul style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;">Abrazo<li style="box-sizing:border-box;">Banner Health</li><li style="box-sizing:border-box;">Barrow Neurological Institute</li><li style="box-sizing:border-box;">Dignity Health</li><li style="box-sizing:border-box;">HonorHealth</li><li style="box-sizing:border-box;">Mayo Clinic</li><li style="box-sizing:border-box;">Phoenix Children’s Hospital</li><li style="box-sizing:border-box;">Phoenix VA Clinic</li><li style="box-sizing:border-box;">Valleywise Health</li><li style="box-sizing:border-box;">Wexford Science + Technology</li></ul><div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;text-align:center;">​<h1 style="margin:0px 0px 20px;font-weight:700;font-size:36px;letter-spacing:-1px;line-height:24px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:montserrat, "open sans", sans-serif !important;color:rgb(0, 0, 0) !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;">How John McCain helped win TGen headquarters deal</h1></div><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">If it hadn’t been for the late Senator John McCain, Translational Genomics Research Institute would not be headquartered in Phoenix. When Dr. Jeffrey Trent was the Scientific Director of the National Human Genome Research Institute at the National Institutes of Health, Senator McCain was instrumental in convincing him to return to Arizona.</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">The late senator wanted Trent to bring new knowledge with him, establishing TGen to turn breakthroughs in genetic research into medical advances.</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">The City of Phoenix constructed the research facilities. Healthcare providers, local corporations and private individuals contributed as well. The final piece to the economic puzzle fell into place when the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community pledged $5 million. Their participation in the effort drew appreciation from across the state and across the nation.</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">Today, the biomedical campus is an integral piece of the statewide bioscience initiative as the faculty contributes significantly to biomedical discoveries, the quality of health care for Arizona's residents and the expansion and diversification of the state's economy. The campus provides a unique, energetic environment that attracts biotech and related companies to Phoenix and Arizona through business opportunities in research and development, collaboration, partnering, and office expansion.</span></p><p><br></p></html></div>https://biomedicalphoenix.com/Lists/News/Attachments/35/WEXFORD-20190304-Wexford-Phoenix-Campus-Rendering-06.jpg2019-10-21T07:00:00ZCity of Phoenix
New Initiative Seeks to Improve Treatment Options for VeteransNew Initiative Seeks to Improve Treatment Options for Veterans<div class="ExternalClassE521F9D6EA934552ACAFF502CA325FB1"><html> <p>​</p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;"> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;" class="ExternalClassBD82E93D33604D39BFFB1AA0A0D8652D"> <figure style="margin:0px;box-sizing:border-box;"> <img class="" style="border-width:0px;border-style:initial;width:1069.13px;max-width:100%;box-sizing:border-box;margin:5px;" alt="Graphic, veteran in uniform shaking hands with doctor wearing white coat" src="https://www.phoenix.gov/econdevsite/MediaAssets/Other/UPDATE-20191007-UA-veterans-health-slide.jpg" /> <figcaption style="box-sizing:border-box;"> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;text-align:center;">Image: University of Arizona College of Medicine — Phoenix</div> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;text-align:center;"> <em style="box-sizing:border-box;">By Teresa Joseph for University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix</em> </div> </figcaption> </figure> <h3 style="margin-top:3px;margin-right:0px;margin-left:0px;font-weight:600;font-size:26px;letter-spacing:-0.4px;box-sizing:border-box;margin-bottom:10px !important;font-family:montserrat, "open sans", sans-serif !important;color:rgb(0, 0, 0) !important;line-height:28px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;">A collaborative program between the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix and the Phoenix Veterans Affairs Health Care System could prevent adverse drug events, save lives and decrease health care costs for veterans.</h3> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">The University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix is partnering with the Phoenix Veterans Affairs Health Care System to provide personalized drug treatment for veterans.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">The program, Pharmacogenomics Action for Cancer Survivorship, is a collaboration between the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and Sanford Health, a Midwest-based health care system, with the goal to improve patient treatment by using medications tailored to their genes. It is funded by a $25 million gift from philanthropist Denny Sanford and a matching fundraising effort from Sanford Health.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">Although the program initially focused on cancer survivors, veterans without cancer also can benefit from PHASeR. The pharmacogenomics tests will help physicians make clinical decisions for a variety of pharmaceutical treatments, including mental health and cardiovascular diseases, as well as pain management.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">Dr. Will Heise, assistant professor in the Division of Clinical Data Analytics and Decision Support at the UA College of Medicine – Phoenix, said PHASeR seeks to prevent adverse reactions to drugs, save lives and decrease health care costs over time.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">“The Veteran’s Administration is heavily invested in pharmacogenomics research and precision medicine,” Heise said. “Arizona veterans will benefit from our early entry into these kinds of programs. We serve a huge and growing number of veterans through the Arizona VA systems and have a talented precision medicine and biomedical informatics team at the UA College of Medicine – Phoenix.”</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">Pharmacogenomics is the study of how genes affect a patient’s response to drugs. By studying an individual’s genes through a simple blood draw, physicians can determine which medications may be more effective for patients and which ones are less likely to produce adverse reactions. The patient’s current medications may be adjusted based on the tests. The results will be applicable throughout the patient’s lifetime and may help a physician select medications in the future, increasing their effectiveness and decreasing the risk of side effects.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">“This partnership signals the commitment of the Phoenix VA and UA College of Medicine – Phoenix to be a powerhouse of pharmacogenomics outcomes research,” Heise said. “This is truly cutting-edge medicine just starting to demonstrate its full potential.”</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">Although cancer survivors are of specific interest, a cancer diagnosis is not required to participate in the program, which will expand to as many as 250,000 veterans at more than 100 sites nationally by 2022. It launched in March in Durham, N.C.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">Dr. Deepak Voora, director of the VA PHASeR Program, said the pilot is an opportunity to give back to veterans.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">“This enhances the VA’s ability to meet new and emerging needs for veterans, their families and caregivers,” said Voora, who is also an associate professor in the Department of Medicine and the Center for Applied Genomics and Precision Medicine at Duke University School of Medicine.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">Veterans can obtain access to the pharmacogenomics testing through a blood draw at their local VA facility. Sanford Health processes the tests at its South Dakota facility, and the patient and his or her physician will receive the results to help decide whether to change treatment.</span>​</p> </div> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;float:none;height:20px;"></div> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="font-weight:700;box-sizing:border-box;">Source: <a style="color:rgb(32, 173, 149);background:transparent;font-family:hind, sans-serif;transition:all 0.2s ease-in-out 0s;box-sizing:border-box;" target="_blank" href="https://uahs.arizona.edu/news/ua-college-medicine-phoenix-va-health-care-system-launch-initiative-improve-treatment-options">https://uahs.arizona.edu/news/ua-college-medicine-phoenix-va-health-care-system-launch-initiative-improve-treatment-options</a>​</span> </p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span> <p> <br> </p> </html></div>2019-09-30T07:00:00ZUA
Entrepreneurial incubator embarks on $1.9M biotech center in downtown PhoenixEntrepreneurial incubator embarks on $1.9M biotech center in downtown Phoenix<div class="ExternalClass38118F41EAC64FAA94C10360E86A0F93"><html> <p>​</p> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;"> <div class="ExternalClass000F929D25EE41E08FEDEE00C40F0D44" style="box-sizing:border-box;"> <figure style="margin:0px;box-sizing:border-box;"> <img src="https://www.phoenix.gov/econdevsite/MediaAssets/EconomyUpdate/UPDATE-20190722-CEI-Representatives-at-Wexford-Groundbreaking.jpg" alt="Four CEI executives at the Wexford groundbreaking" style="border-width:0px;border-style:initial;width:1069.13px;max-width:100%;box-sizing:border-box;margin:5px;" class="" /> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;text-align:center;"> <figcaption style="box-sizing:border-box;"> <em style="box-sizing:border-box;">CEI executives attend the March 7, 2019 groundbreaking of the Wexford Science and Technology in the downtown Phoenix Biomedical Campus. CEI LabForce, a professional development center, will be a part of the new building. (Pictured l-r) Amanda Mollindo, CEI marketing coordinator; Patti Dubois, CEI assistant executive director; Tom Schumann, CEI executive director; and Alex Wasson, CEI research analyst.</em> Image: CEI, Gateway Community College</figcaption> </div> </figure> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;text-align:center;"> <em style="box-sizing:border-box;">REPLACE WITH BYLINE AND PUBLICATION</em> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;text-align:center;"> <em style="box-sizing:border-box;"> <br> </em> </div> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">The Center for Entrepreneurial Innovation is expanding into downtown Phoenix with a $1.9 million professional development center designed to prepare Arizona’s workforce for biotech and life science careers.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">CEI LabForce, anticipated to open in fall 2020, will be on the ground floor of the $77 million Wexford Science and Technology building that Arizona State University will anchor on the Phoenix Biomedical Campus.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">The site will be CEI’s second Valley location and offer in-person and online technical workshops and lab training for scientists, lab and manufacturing technicians, quality systems managers and executive teams in th</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">bioscience industry, said Tom Schumann, CEI’s executive director.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">“A sophisticated learning management system will be developed with over 400 lab science, quality-assurance and regulatory-compliance courses in the catalog,” Schumann said. “We’ll be contracting with content providers from across the country to bring the learning modules into it.”</span>​</p> </div> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;float:none;height:20px;"></div> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="font-weight:700;box-sizing:border-box;">Source: <a href="https://www.bizjournals.com/phoenix/news/2019/07/19/entrepreneurial-incubator-embarks-on-1-9m-biotech.html" target="_blank" style="color:rgb(32, 173, 149);background:transparent;font-family:hind, sans-serif;transition:all 0.2s ease-in-out 0s;box-sizing:border-box;">https://www.bizjournals.com/phoenix/news/2019/07/19/entrepreneurial-incubator-embarks-on-1-9m-biotech.html</a>​</span> </p> <p> <br> </p> </html></div>2019-07-22T07:00:00ZCEI
Helios Scholars at TGen prepares students for successHelios Scholars at TGen prepares students for success<div class="ExternalClassD1F0FB13800D4FEB8F93470613D84255"><html> <p>​</p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;"> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;" class="ExternalClass07BF03D6B95B4804AF2AA2C14B6022D6"> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <em style="box-sizing:border-box;">By Steve Yozwiak for Translational Genomics Research Institute</em> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">For recent college graduate Annie Schmidt, her internship last summer at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope, melded her experiences with a grandparent and a desire to foster better medical care for patients with dementia.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;"></span> </p>Her internship as a member of the 2018 class of Helios Scholars at TGen not only helped encourage her to pursue a career as a physician-scientist, but also helped her focus on Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia as a specialty.<p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;"></span></p>“After walking with my grandfather through dementia, I plan to direct my career in medicine towards helping families struggling with cognitive changes,” said Annie, who last year studied a rare genetic link to Alzheimer’s. She returns today to TGen as a member of the 2019 class of Helios Scholars at TGen. “My work in the field of Alzheimer’s disease at TGen directly furthers that plan.”<p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;"></span></p>This is a prime example of how TGen provides high-level science research exposure through its premier internship program, Helios Scholars at TGen, which is sponsored by Helios Education Foundation.<p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;"></span></p>Now in its 13th year, Helios Scholars at TGen each summer provides 45 undergraduate, graduate and medical school students a paid 8-week internship that aims to prepare the next generation of Arizona bioscience researchers and physicians.<p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;"></span></p>Since 2007, more than 500 students have participated in Helios Scholars at TGen, in which TGen scientists share research expertise and technical skills, bioethics, experimental design, and the translational process of quickly moving laboratory discoveries into new therapeutics to benefit patients with neurological disorders, diabetes, infectious diseases and many types of cancer.<p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;"></span></p>Annie again will work in the lab of TGen Professor Dr. Matt Huentelman, where this summer she will help analyze the reaction times of volunteers who take TGen’s MindCrowd test, the world’s largest scientific survey of how normal healthy brains function. More than 115,000 people — from all 50 states and more than 150 nations around the world — have completed the 10-minute online test at MindCrowd.org, helping researchers to better understand Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia.<p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;"></span></p>Helios Scholars at TGen also is designed to: increase access to academic experiences for underrepresented populations; demonstrate TGen’s and Helios’ leadership in innovative bioscience education; and enable graduates to become peer models who can inspire other students to achieve.<p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;"></span></p>“We believe Helios Scholars at TGen is preparing students like Annie for the future, providing them with real-world, laboratory experience that will help prepare them for success in college and career,” said Paul J. Luna, President and CEO, Helios Education Foundation. “Arizona will need talented, self-disciplined and caring individuals in the future to address the many serious and rare diseases that affect individuals and families.”<p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;"></span></p>The 2019 class of Helios Scholars at TGen starts today, June 10, and ends August 2 with a daylong scientific symposium, showcasing the students’ accomplishments. Helios Scholars earn an hourly wage that varies with experience.<p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;"></span></p>Annie, a Phoenix native who recently completed her undergraduate degree in biochemistry at Arizona State University, is now considering applying to medical school, pursuing dual degrees as an M.D. and Ph.D.:<p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;"></span></p>“This would have been impossible without my experience as a Helios Scholar at TGen.”<p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"></p>​<br style="box-sizing:border-box;"></div> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;float:none;height:20px;"></div> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="font-weight:700;box-sizing:border-box;">Source: <a style="color:rgb(32, 173, 149);background:transparent;font-family:hind, sans-serif;transition:all 0.2s ease-in-out 0s;box-sizing:border-box;" target="_blank" href="https://www.azbio.org/helios-scholars-at-tgen-prepares-students-for-success">https://www.azbio.org/helios-scholars-at-tgen-prepares-students-for-success</a>​</span> </p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span> <p> <br> </p> </html></div>2019-06-10T07:00:00ZTGen
Bioscience Is Creating a More Stable Market in PhoenixBioscience Is Creating a More Stable Market in Phoenix<div class="ExternalClass789E4D2534594864965C1E2194710EE1"><html> <p>​</p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;"> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;" class="ExternalClassABBFC9BED1A9414585E53FD86D01BE94"> <img class="" style="border-width:0px;border-style:initial;width:1069.13px;max-width:100%;box-sizing:border-box;margin:5px;" alt="WEXFORD-20190304-Wexford-Phoenix-Campus-Rendering-06.jpg" src="https://www.phoenix.gov/econdevsite/MediaAssets/WEXFORD-20190304-Wexford-Phoenix-Campus-Rendering-06.jpg" /> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <em style="box-sizing:border-box;">By ​Kelsi Maree Borland for Globe St. (Orig. pub. March 18, 2019)​</em> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"></p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;">Bioscience and life science are growing rapidly in Phoenix, and the industries are fueling local economic, job and population growth. In the long-term, they will also ensure more stability for​​​​​ Phoenix—an important characteristic for a market that was hit so badly in the last recession. It could also mean longer future growth for the market.</p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;">“For Phoenix, growth in the bioscience and healthcare industry means stable, quality jobs with defined career progressions for our residents and the many new people moving to the market,” Christine Mackay, director of Phoenix community and economic devel​​​opment at the City of Phoenix, tells GlobeSt.com. “Our home, Mari​​​copa County, saw the greatest population increase numbers in 2016 and 2017. These new residents are able to find opportunity in this rapidly growing sector. Jobs have been growing 14% faster than the U.S. overall in bioscience and healthcare.”</p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;">​The Wexford Science+Technology Phoenix has been a catalyst for growth in these industries. With a $77 million price tag, the 200,000-square-foot development in Downtown Phoenix will be anchored by ASU, which is expanding in the Downtown area. “Wexford brings to its first western U.S. site a vibrant, mixed-use, amenity-rich Knowledge Community,” adds Mackay. “Built on a foundation of research, discovery and ​entrepreneurial activity, Wexford will bring in businesses new to Phoenix and help incubating and fledgling companies find a thriving environment for growth. Wexford’s current developed markets, such as St. Louis, Philadelphia, Providence and Baltimore, have been transformed in part by what they bring to the table.”​​​​<br style="box-sizing:border-box;"></p> </div> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;float:none;height:20px;"></div> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="font-weight:700;box-sizing:border-box;">Source: <a style="color:rgb(32, 173, 149);background:transparent;font-family:hind, sans-serif;transition:all 0.2s ease-in-out 0s;box-sizing:border-box;" target="_blank" href="https://www.globest.com/2019/03/18/bioscience-is-creating-a-more-stable-market-in-phoenix/">https://www.globest.com/2019/03/18/bioscience-is-creating-a-more-stable-market-in-phoenix/</a>​</span> </p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span> <p> <br> </p> </html></div>2019-06-06T07:00:00ZPhoenix Bio News
A Major Bioscience Hub Is Emerging in PhoenixA Major Bioscience Hub Is Emerging in Phoenix<div class="ExternalClass35E14966D7254F63B5F6C4B63D13181F"><html> <p>​</p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;"> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;" class="ExternalClassA444686D208C418FBEFC00455BE91595"> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <img class="" style="border-width:0px;border-style:initial;width:1069.13px;max-width:100%;box-sizing:border-box;margin:5px;" alt="" src="https://www.phoenix.gov/econdevsite/MediaAssets/EconomyUpdate/UA-MED-20170310-Sunrise-UA-Med-School.jpg" /> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <em style="box-sizing:border-box;">By Kelsi Maree Borland for GlobeSt​ (original publication March 12, 2019)</em> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"></p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">The bioscience market is taking off in Phoenix. The market has more bioscience and healthcare facility product under construction than any other market in the US, according to research from CBRE. In the next 24 moths, there is more than $3.5 billion in capital investment, which equates to 4.4 million square feet of construction activity, planned in the market. This market growth comes on the heels of significant job, population and economic growth in the Greater Phoenix market.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">“We’re fortunate in Phoenix to host and grow a very modern healthcare infrastructure and a variety of research institutions making significant bioscience and healthcare breakthroughs,” Christine Mackay, director of Phoenix community and economic development at the City of Phoenix, tells GlobeSt.com. “We have scientists and researchers making amazing discoveries in genomic, molecular medicine and curing cancer. Phoenix offers bioscience and biotechnology businesses an affordable, diverse and collaborative environment. The entire spectrum of research, from discovery to development, from growth to delivery; it’s all part of the Phoenix bioscience and healthcare community.”</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">The most significant projects include a $600 million extension of the Mayo Clinic Phoenix campus, which will double in size; a $900 million teaching hospital by the Maricopa Integrated Healthcare System; and 1 million square foot Wexford Bioscience and Technology campus, which recently broke ground. In addition, there is also a $150 million Creighton University Medical School, which is set to break ground in May.​</span> </p> </div> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;float:none;height:20px;"></div> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="font-weight:700;box-sizing:border-box;">Source: <a style="color:rgb(32, 173, 149);background:transparent;font-family:hind, sans-serif;transition:all 0.2s ease-in-out 0s;box-sizing:border-box;" target="_blank" href="https://www.globest.com/2019/03/12/a-major-bioscience-hub-is-emerging-in-phoenix/">https://www.globest.com/2019/03/12/a-major-bioscience-hub-is-emerging-in-phoenix/</a>​</span> </p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span> <p> <br> </p> </html></div>2019-06-06T07:00:00ZPhoenix Bio News
TGEN And HonorHealth Contribute To Nature Study, Discovering Possible New Treatment And Early Detection ApproachesTGEN And HonorHealth Contribute To Nature Study, Discovering Possible New Treatment And Early Detection Approaches<div class="ExternalClass9DEC578AE4EA4E0FBD07461D9849CD80"><html> <p>​</p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;"> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;" class="ExternalClass517EDE10D1A14063842ADA7CB2662D24"> <img class="" style="border-width:0px;border-style:initial;width:1069.13px;max-width:100%;box-sizing:border-box;margin:5px;" alt="ABC-TGEN-006.jpg" src="https://www.phoenix.gov/econdevsite/MediaAssets/ABC-TGEN-006.jpg" />​<p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><em style="box-sizing:border-box;">By Steven Yozwiak for Translational Genomics Research Institute, an affiliate of City of Hope</em></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">Physician-scientists at <a style="color:rgb(32, 173, 149);background:transparent;font-family:hind, sans-serif;transition:all 0.2s ease-in-out 0s;box-sizing:border-box;" href="https://www.honorhealth.com/" target="_blank"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;">HonorHealth</span></a><span style="box-sizing:border-box;"> Research Institute and the </span><a style="color:rgb(32, 173, 149);background:transparent;font-family:hind, sans-serif;transition:all 0.2s ease-in-out 0s;box-sizing:border-box;" href="https://www.tgen.org/" target="_blank"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;">Translational Genomics Research Institute</span></a><span style="box-sizing:border-box;">, an affiliate of </span><a style="color:rgb(32, 173, 149);background:transparent;font-family:hind, sans-serif;transition:all 0.2s ease-in-out 0s;box-sizing:border-box;" href="https://www.cityofhope.org/homepage" target="_blank"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;">City of Hope</span></a><span style="box-sizing:border-box;">, played key roles in a study published today in the premier scientific journal Nature, which revealed previously unknown impacts of a protein in pancreatic cancer, the nation’s third leading cause of cancer related death.</span></span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">A dense tissue, called stroma, surrounds and often ‘hides’ the pancreatic tumor cells from the patient’s immune system and also prevents anti-can​cer therapeutics from penetrating to the tumor. This results in “tenacious resistance” to the patient’s immune system and to therapeutic drugs, the study said.</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">Following a systematic investigation of the proteins that result from the interaction of fibrous (stellate) cells, which surround pancreatic cancer cells, researchers zeroed in on the role played by a protein called Leukemia Inhibitory Factor (LIF), linking it to both the growth of pancreatic tumors and to the dense tissue that surrounds these tumors.</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">In laboratory experiments, researchers found that both LIF blocking with an antibody and LIF genetic deletion “significantly slow tumor progression” and increase the effectiveness of chemotherapy to promote survival, according to the study, which included an international consortium of 18 researcher institutes, including TGen and HonorHealth Research Institute.</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">“Pancreatic cancer is a very tough problem, in part because of the dense tissue surrounding the tumor,” said Dr. Daniel Von Hoff, TGen Distinguished Professor and Physician-In-Chief.</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">“By uncovering the previously underappreciated role of LIF in the development of stroma, cellular interactions and tumor growth, our team has contributed significantly to the search for new therapies for this terrible disease,” said Dr. Von Hoff, who also holds the positions of Virginia G. Piper Distinguished Chair for Innovative Cancer Research and Chief Scientific Officer at HonorHealth Research Institute.</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">In addition, the study says, the presence of LIF could be used not only as a therapeutic target, but also as a biomarker in circulating blood, which could aid in earlier diagnosis of pancreatic cancer and possibly in monitoring the effects of treatment.</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">Like other digestive cancers, pancreatic cancer exhibits few symptoms in its early stages, and is usually not diagnosed until its late stages, when there are fewer options for treatment and chances of patient survival dim.</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">Dr. Von Hoff played a substantial role in the study — </span><a style="color:rgb(32, 173, 149);background:transparent;font-family:hind, sans-serif;transition:all 0.2s ease-in-out 0s;box-sizing:border-box;" href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-019-1130-6" target="_blank"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">Targeting LIF-mediated paracrine interaction for pancreatic cancer therapy and monitoring</span></a><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;"> — by being the principal investigator on the study's Stand Up To Cancer grant, and helping put together the investigation team. He also coordinated samples of pancreatic cancer tissue, and provided clinically relevant suggestions.</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">“The discovery of LIF’s role in pancreatic cancer is tremendous as it gives us another avenue to treat pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, its potential role as biomarker is important as some individuals with pancreatic cancer don’t have a reliable biomarker and uncovering additional ways to monitor the disease is important,” said Dr. Erkut Borazanci, a TGen adjunct faculty member and Clinical Investigator and Medical Oncologist at HonorHealth Research Institute, who also provided tissue samples. Dr. Borazanci also is Medical Director of HonorHealth Research Institute’s Early Detection Pancreas Program.</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">Funding for this study was provided by numerous government institutes and foundations, including: National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, Lustgarten Foundation, Helmsley Charitable Trust, American Cancer Society, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ministry of Science and Technology of China, and National Natural Science Foundation of China. The investigation was led by the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, which provided facilities and staff.</span></p><p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:15px;">More specifically, Dr. Von Hoff’s work was supported by a grant from a Stand Up To Cancer (SU2C) Pancreatic Cancer Dream Team, and Dr. Borazanci’s contributions were supported by a grant from the Flinn Foundation.​</span>​</p></div> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;float:none;height:20px;"></div> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="font-weight:700;box-sizing:border-box;">Source: <a style="color:rgb(32, 173, 149);background:transparent;font-family:hind, sans-serif;transition:all 0.2s ease-in-out 0s;box-sizing:border-box;" target="_blank" href="https://www.tgen.org/news/2019/april/17/tgen-contributes-to-pancreatic-cancer-study-in-nature/">https://www.tgen.org/news/2019/april/17/tgen-contributes-to-pancreatic-cancer-study-in-nature/</a>​</span> </p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span> <p> <br> </p> </html></div>2019-04-17T07:00:00ZTGen
TGEN REVIEW LINKS GENE WITH THE MOST COMMON LIVER CANCERTGEN REVIEW LINKS GENE WITH THE MOST COMMON LIVER CANCER<div class="ExternalClassB26ECF57B6784998960F5794B5EDE8A8"><html> <ul style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:10px;padding-left:0px;margin-left:-5px;list-style:none;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;" class="list-inline posted-info"> <li style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;display:inline-block;padding-right:5px;padding-left:5px;font-style:italic;"> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">Written by</span> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;" class="uBlogsy_author_name"><a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);outline:0px !important;" title="Steve Yozwiak" href="https://www.tgen.org/news/?author=Steve+Yozwiak" target="_blank">Steve Yozwiak</a></span></div> </li> <li style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;display:inline-block;padding-right:5px;padding-left:5px;font-style:italic;"> <div> <br> <br> </div> </li> </ul> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;font-weight:700;">PHOENIX, Ariz. — April 5, 2019 —</span> Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a long medical name for the most common form of liver cancer, a malignancy whose incidence has nearly doubled over the past decade, making it the fastest growing type of cancer in the U.S., and the third-leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">In an article published today in the scientific journal <em style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">Cancers</em>, researchers at the <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.tgen.org/" target="_blank">Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen)</a><span style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">, </span>an affiliate of <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.cityofhope.org/homepage" target="_blank">City of Hope</a><span style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">,</span> provide the first summary of the experimental evidence supporting the AKR1B10 enzyme as a promising therapeutic target for HCC, based on a review of more than 50 studies published since this gene was first identified and characterized in 1998.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">“While the association between this gene and HCC is well recognized, in this review we see AKR1B10 emerging as not only a therapeutic target for this type of liver cancer, but also having potential use in early diagnosis of this deadly disease,” said Dr. Johanna DiStefano, head of the Diabetes and Fibrotic Disease Unit at TGen.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">Importantly, AKR1B10 has a seemingly conflicting role in HCC development and progression. This gene’s over expression is a clear indicator that a patient might have HCC, and yet the suppression of this gene may also be seen as a way to stop the cancer’s progression and spread, said Dr. DiStefano, a Professor at TGen and the paper’s senior author.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">Like many types of digestive cancers, HCC exhibits few symptoms in its early stages, and is usually not diagnosed until its late stages, when there are fewer options for treatment and the chances of patient survival dim.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">In the U.S., the number of liver cancer diagnoses has nearly doubled, from about 22,000 cases in 2009 to an estimated 42,000 cases this year. Men are almost twice as likely to contract this disease than women.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">This year, nearly 32,000 patients will die of liver cancer, making it the fifth leading cause of cancer related death in the U.S., following closely on the heels of breast and pancreatic cancers. Worldwide, liver cancer is the third leading cause of cancer related death, according to the review paper: <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6694/11/4/486" target="_blank"><em style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;">Diagnostic and Prognostic Potential of AKR1B10 in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma</em></a>.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">HCC is the most common cause of death in patients with cirrhosis of the liver, which is most strongly associated with over-consumption of alcohol, viral infections and <a style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;background-color:transparent;color:rgb(12, 72, 135);outline:0px !important;" href="https://www.tgen.org/news/2018/july/18/tgen-finds-dna-link-to-liver-disease/?search=nafld" target="_blank">nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)</a>.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">While AKR1B10 has emerged as a potential biomarker for the diagnosis and prognosis of HCC, studies show this enzyme also plays a role in the development and progression of HCC, the paper says. AKR1B10 appears to affect HCC’s resistance to currently available chemotherapies, making HCC more difficult to treat. At the same time, the TGen paper shows that higher expression of this gene is paradoxically associated with better long-term outcomes, increased survival rates and lower incidence of metastatic spread to other parts of the body. The aggregate findings suggest that AKR1B10 may be performing different functions at different stages of HCC.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">“Identification of biomarkers for various stages of HCC is critical to improving early disease detection and enabling early implementation of chemotherapy and surgical removal of the tumor to prevent the cancer’s progression and spread to other organs,” said Dr. Bethany Davis, a post-doctoral fellow in Dr. DiStefano’s lab and also an author of the paper.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">The molecular mechanisms underlying HCC, and the role AKR1B10 plays in this disease, however, continue to remain poorly understood, Dr. DiStefano said.</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">“Still, our review shows that AKR1B10 might be exploited for early cancer prevention,” she said. “And the value of this gene in therapies and clinical management of specific subtypes of HCC clearly warrant further investigation.”</p> <p style="box-sizing:border-box;border-radius:0px;margin:0px 0px 20px;color:rgb(85, 85, 85);font-family:"helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">This review study was funded by TGen.​<br></p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span> <p> <br> </p> </html></div>2019-04-15T07:00:00ZTGen
TGEN Physician-In-Chief Receives Distinguished Public Service Award From AACRTGEN Physician-In-Chief Receives Distinguished Public Service Award From AACR<div class="ExternalClass4BBC99D0CD994000A4353A20D9598838"><html> <p>​</p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;"> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;" class="ExternalClass17007454A31E44E299C9748355F953D6"> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <img class="" style="border-width:0px;border-style:initial;width:1069.13px;max-width:100%;box-sizing:border-box;margin:5px;" alt="dr_daniel_von_hoff.jpg" src="https://www.phoenix.gov/econdevsite/MediaAssets/dr_daniel_von_hoff.jpg" /> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </p> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;"> <em style="box-sizing:border-box;">By Steve Yozwiak for Translational Genomics Research Institute, an affilate of City of Hope</em> </div> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">Dr. Daniel D. Von Hoff, Distinguished Professor and Physician-In-Chief for the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope, has been selected to receive the 2019 Distinguished Public Service Award from the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR). The AACR is the world’s first and largest professional organization dedicated to advancing cancer research and its mission to prevent and cure cancer.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">Dr. Margaret Foti, Chief Executive Officer of the AACR, said in a letter to Dr. Von Hoff that the award is “in recognition of your extraordinary clinical research career.” Specifically, Dr. Foti cited Dr. Von Hoff’s contributions in creating the Methods in Clinical Cancer Research Workshop, which she described as “the world’s premier workshop dedicated to educating individuals on effective clinical trial designs and therapeutic interventions for the treatment of cancer.”</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">For the past 23 summers, Dr. Von Hoff has led the weeklong workshop, drawing on the expertise of nearly 40 of the nation's leading oncologists, patient advocates and biostatisticians to provide intensive cancer care instruction for newly minted physicians. The workshop is sponsored by the AACR and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the world’s two leading cancer professional organizations, and by the National Cancer Institute though a competitive grant.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">The workshop enrolls 100 students each summer. The program's nearly 2,300 graduates now populate leading cancer centers throughout the nation.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">"We put each applicant through a rigorous process, selecting doctors who have a deep interest in making clinical advances. Participants say it's one of the most effective courses in preparation for cancer patient care," said Dr. Von Hoff, who also is Professor of Medicine at Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, Chief Scientific Officer for US Oncology Research, and Medical Director of Research at McKesson Specialty Health. He holds the Virginia G. Piper Distinguished Chair for Innovative Cancer Research at HonorHealth Clinical Research Institute.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">Dr. Von Hoff also is a past director of the Arizona Cancer Center, a past board member and President of the AACR, a Fellow of the AACR Academy, and recipient of the distinguished 1997 AACR Richard and Hinda Rosenthal Memorial Award. In addition, he is a past board member of ASCO and winner of its prestigious 2010 David A. Karnofsky Memorial Award for outstanding contributions to the improvement of patient care.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">Dr. Von Hoff’s clinical career is legendary. He has led or participated in more than 350 first-in-human investigational agent clinical trials. For the past 17 years, his work at TGen has brought new treatments into clinical practice that have increased the survival of patients with pancreas cancer and has ushered in groundbreaking advances in other malignancies.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">Dr. Von Hoff is also a Senior Consultant and Clinical Investigator at City of Hope, a world-renowned independent research and treatment center for cancer, diabetes and other life-threatening diseases. He has led teams of TGen and City of Hope investigators to explore new medical breakthroughs in pancreatic cancer, childhood leukemia, stem cells, 3-D imaging and more. Through this work, he has expanded options for cancer patients, most of whom are desperate for new and more effective treatments.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">“Dr. Von Hoff’s reputation of providing compassionate care to patients precedes him,” said Dr. Michael Caligiuri, past-President of the AACR and the Deana and Steve Campbell Physician-in-Chief Distinguished Chair and President of City of Hope National Medical Center. “It’s wonderful that someone who is internationally recognized for advancing so many cancer therapeutics has made it his mission to mentor the next generation of oncology physician-scientists.”</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">Through the Methods in Clinical Cancer Research Workshop, Dr. Von Hoff teaches the essentials of effective clinical trial design for therapeutic interventions in the treatment of all cancers. Working around the clock, each summer's class is divided into 12 groups. Each student must write a protocol for a new cancer clinical trial of sufficient quality to pass an Institutional Review Board, a critical step in receiving FDA approval to pursue such a study. Clinical trials are carefully controlled research studies that evaluate promising new drugs, while giving patients access to the latest in potentially lifesaving therapeutics.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">The AACR and ASCO have helped design the Methods workshop to increase the reliability and effectiveness of clinical trials.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">Dr. Foti noted that the success of the Methods workshop has prompted similar programs in Africa, Asia, Australia and Europe, resulting in the training of an additional 2,000 clinical investigators around the world.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">“Collectively, these accomplishments have been made possible thanks to your unwavering vision and commitment to the workshop,” Dr. Foti said in her letter to Dr. Von Hoff. “Your ability to constantly innovate is unparallelednparalleled and has allowed the workshop to have a tremendous impact on the number of lives saved as a result of the training of thousands of physician-scientists.”</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">Dr. Von Hoff will receive the award during the 2019 AACR Annual Meeting — March 29-April 3 in Atlanta — where he will present a featured lecture at 7 a.m. April 1 at the Georgia World Congress Center.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">Dr. Jeffrey Trent, TGen President and Research Director, said of the award, “I can think of no one more deserving of this recognition than Dr. Von Hoff, whose unparalleled practice of precision medicine and its resulting benefit in patient care is a biomedical beacon for us all to follow.”</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">Dr. Von Hoff is the co-editor of a forthcoming book, “Precision Medicine in Cancer Therapy,” to be published by Springer Nature, Scientific Publishing Services Ltd.​</span> </p> </div> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;float:none;height:20px;"></div> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="font-weight:700;box-sizing:border-box;">Source: <a style="color:rgb(32, 173, 149);background:transparent;font-family:hind, sans-serif;transition:all 0.2s ease-in-out 0s;box-sizing:border-box;" target="_blank" href="https://www.tgen.org/news/2019/march/26/tgens-dr-von-hoff-recognized-by-the-aacr/">https://www.tgen.org/news/2019/march/26/tgens-dr-von-hoff-recognized-by-the-aacr/</a>​</span> </p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span> <p> <br> </p> </html></div>2019-03-26T07:00:00ZTGen
As If By Magic: TGEN Develops Program That Lights Up Cancer-Causing MutationsAs If By Magic: TGEN Develops Program That Lights Up Cancer-Causing Mutations<div class="ExternalClass2C0EE29225434743999F0AB6524490CA"><html> <p>​</p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;"> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;" class="ExternalClass5C9395E33FE944BD88E474735B0681C5"> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <img class="" style="border-width:0px;border-style:initial;width:1069.13px;max-width:100%;box-sizing:border-box;margin:5px;" alt="" src="https://www.phoenix.gov/econdevsite/MediaAssets/Rebecca-Halperin-MD-TGEN.jpg" /> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> <em style="box-sizing:border-box;">By Steve Yozwiak for Translational Genomics Research Institute, an affilate of City of Hope</em> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">By conjuring the spell “Lumos!” wizards in the mythical world of Harry Potter could light up the tip of their magic wands and illuminate their surroundings. So, too, does LumosVar, a computer program developed by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), “light up” cancer-causing genetic Var-ients, or mutations, illuminating how physicians might best treat their patients.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">A study published today in the scientific journal Frontiers in Oncology describes how researchers at TGen, an affiliate of City of Hope, developed LumosVar to create a tool that can accurately identify cancer-causing mutations from patient tumor samples.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">In the case of archived samples from patients for which treatment outcome results are known, these represent a treasure trove of information that could accelerate research by investigators and physicians in predicting responses of future patients to particular treatments.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">“There are many open questions in precision oncology that can only be answered by collecting large amounts of patient genomic data linked to treatment response and clinical outcomes,” said Dr. Rebecca Halperin, a Research Assistant Professor in TGen’s Quantitative Medicine and Systems Biology Program.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">“The approach we outline in this study should enable researchers to use archival samples more effectively. Accurately calling, or identifying, somatic variants — those DNA changes specific to a patient’s cancer — are the first step in any analysis,” said Dr. Halperin, the study’s lead author.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">However, archived tumor samples are frequently not accompanied by the patients’ normal — or germline — genetic information, making it difficult to distinguish the patient’s normal DNA variants to their mutated and cancerous DNA changes.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">LumosVar is a precise enough tool that it not only can detect the cancerous DNA from a patient sample, but it also can differentiate the adjacent normal DNA that may surround the tumor in the sample. Comparing the patient’s normal DNA from a suspected cancer-causing mutation is critical to eliminating benign, non-cancerous variants in the sample — “false positives” — and ensuring that the tissue sample analysis is as accurate as possible.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">A high level of accuracy is needed for physicians to use this information in precision medicine, determining what treatment each individual patient should receive.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">“The sequencing of DNA from tissue adjacent to the tumor could help identify somatic, or cancer-causing, mutations when another source of normal tissue is not available,” said Dr. Sara Byron, Research Assistant Professor in TGen’s Integrated Cancer Genomics Division, and also the study’s senior author.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">Also contributing to this study were: Imaging Endpoints, HonorHealth, GE Research Center, and Prairie View A&M University.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">This study — Leveraging Spatial Variation in Tumor Purity for Improved Somatic Variant Calling of Archival Tumor Only Samples — was funded by The Ben and Catherine Ivy Foundation, GE Global Research, and the Texas A&M System Chancellor’s Research Initiative.​</span> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </p> </div> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;float:none;height:20px;"></div> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="font-weight:700;box-sizing:border-box;">Source: <a style="color:rgb(32, 173, 149);background:transparent;font-family:hind, sans-serif;transition:all 0.2s ease-in-out 0s;box-sizing:border-box;" target="_blank" href="https://www.tgen.org/news/2019/march/20/lumosvar-helps-physicians-identify-cancer-mutations/">https://www.tgen.org/news/2019/march/20/lumosvar-helps-physicians-identify-cancer-mutations/</a>​</span> </p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span> <p> <br> </p> </html></div>2019-03-20T07:00:00ZTGen
ASU and Wexford break ground for Phoenix Biomedical campus expansionASU and Wexford break ground for Phoenix Biomedical campus expansion<div class="ExternalClass541456F5CFE241A59A199AA0FE0FD512"><html> <p>​</p>Officials from Wexford Science and Technology, Arizona State University, Ventas Inc. and the city of Phoenix celebrated the groundbreaking of a new Phoenix Biomedical campus expansion near the southwest corner of Garfield and Fifth streets on Thursday.<br><br>The $77 million and 200,000 square-foot facility is Wexford Science and Technology’s 13th project and the first public-private development on the Phoenix Biomedical campus. Wexford is a private research company that focuses on partnering with universities and other institutions to build mixed-use projects.<br>“This is a true effort between the city of Phoenix, Arizona State University and Wexford Science and Technology. This is a true public-private partnership to bring the next project on the Phoenix Biomedical campus out of the ground,” said Christine Mackay, Phoenix Community and Economic Development director.<br><br>ASU is the anchor tenant of the building, leasing out half of the building for a medical research lab.<br>“This Wexford facility is a fantastic partnership for us because it empowers our College of Health Solutions; College of Nursing and Health Innovation, which is on this campus; the University of Arizona College of Medicine; the NAU programs and Allied Health,” said ASU President Michael Crow. “All of this energy that’s here on the Phoenix Biomedical campus creates more creative critical mass. That’s what we’re after.”<br><br>Peter Bulgarelli, the executive vice president of Ventas Inc., said the development aims to help ASU reach its goals, including establishing the school as a leading global center for research by 2025. Ventas is a real estate investment trust company that is also partnered with Wexford in developing ASU’s research and innovation.<br><br>“We hope that this campus will be a key element in creating a global center for interdisciplinary research, discovery and development … by providing capital for ASU we hope that students, researchers and professionals will be free to devote themselves to creating public value,” Bulgarelli said.<br><br>The city of Phoenix has 4.2 million square feet of research and patient care buildings in development over the next 24 months, which will create more than 7,000 jobs, according to Mackay.<br><br>“This becomes a project in which private capital is put to work. Private capital generates jobs, income, wealth and positive outcome,” Crow said. “These are not projects that are driven by the government; these are projects that are enabled by the government and driven by the market.”<br><br>About 40 or 50 percent of the jobs created in the Wexford Science and Technology Phoenix Biomedical building will not require a four-year degree, according to James Berens, founder and CEO of Wexford Science and Technology.<br><br>“Beyond ASU graduates, which are outstanding, we’re working with the Phoenix Union Bioscience High School and Gateway Community College to create opportunity for the rest of the town,” said Berens.<br>Berens said the company has high expectations about the results of the partnership.<br><br>“Wexford is all in creating this knowledge community here in downtown Phoenix. What we mean by ‘all in’ is that obviously we’re excited, we’re committed, and we have a high level of confidence this is going to be successful,” Berens said. “So confident that yesterday we did start the design pre-development work for the second building.”<br><br>The Phoenix Biomedical campus started as an idea in the late 1980s and early 1990s and more than $600 million has been invested in it since its establishment in the early 2000s, according to the city of Phoenix.<br><br>“We look forward to expanding on our biomedical campus, connecting it further into the community and creating that innovation zone of the Phoenix core that surrounds this area,” said Mackay.<br><br>The Phoenix Biomedical campus currently houses 1.5 million square-feet of academic research and clinical space and is expected to support up to 6 million square feet when fully developed, according to a Ventas Inc. press release.<br><br>The building is expected to open in late 2020.​<br><p><br></p></html></div>https://biomedicalphoenix.com/Lists/News/Attachments/29/ASU_Wexford.jpg2019-03-08T07:00:00ZASU
Phoenix's Growing Life Science District Sets Its Eyes on National ProminencePhoenix's Growing Life Science District Sets Its Eyes on National Prominence<div class="ExternalClass78DE1473691144B8B74E37EBD5F1A754"><html> <p>Baltimore-Based Developer Plans Projects Near Downtown's Roosevelt Row The Phoenix Biomedical Campus includes Arizona State's Biomedical Sciences Partnership building opened in 2017. Illustration: Arizona State University Phoenix ofcials say an almost two-decade effort to promote bioscience research is helping to catapult the city into a leading position among cities across the United States for life science and health care development.​<span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span><br></p><p>Click <strong style="color:rgb(0, 0, 139);"><a target="_blank" href="https://www.phoenix.gov/econdevsite/Documents/NEWS%20DOCUMENTS/COSTAR%2020190308%20Wexford%20Groundbreaking.pdf#search=wexford">Here ​</a></strong>To Read More:<br></p> </html></div>2019-03-07T07:00:00ZPhoenix Bio News
TGEN Plays Key Role In Identifying Foothold For Leveraging Cancer Cell WeaknessTGEN Plays Key Role In Identifying Foothold For Leveraging Cancer Cell Weakness<div class="ExternalClass0A3F0CEC113048E49A5241168EDB54A4"><html> <p>​</p> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;"> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;" class="ExternalClass2F5E4164BE1E42A39E55BB890F0B3FBA"> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <img class="" style="border-width:0px;border-style:initial;width:1069.13px;max-width:100%;box-sizing:border-box;margin:5px;" alt="dr-sen-peng.jpg" src="https://www.phoenix.gov/econdevsite/MediaAssets/dr-sen-peng.jpg" /> <em style="font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;background-color:window;color:windowtext;box-sizing:border-box;">By Steve Yozwiak for Translational Genomics Research Institute, an affilate of City of Hope</em> <br> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">The Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope, played a key role in a nationwide study that identified a method of starving pancreatic cancer cells, opening a new treatment avenue should clinical trial results prove successful.</span></p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">Published today in Nature Medicine, the study — led by University of North Carolina — describes how pancreatic cancer, driven by a mutation of the gene KRAS, can be cornered into reliance on a single energy source known as autophagy, the process by which a cancer cell recycles its own parts to stay alive. The results suggest that once the pancreatic cancer is dependent on autophagy — also known as “self-eating” — a treatment strategy that stops autophagy would starve the cancer cells of nutrients needed for growth, thereby killing them.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">TGen computational scientist Dr. Sen Peng played a critical early role in the study by conducting RNA sequencing and analysis that identified the key genetic targets of this investigation, especially the roles played by the KRAS and ERK genes, and inhibiting autophagy as an energy source.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">Dr. Peng’s analysis showed that by either suppressing the KRAS gene, or inhibiting ERK, investigators could impair other potential energy metabolisms for the cancer cells, thereby making the cells more dependent on autophagy. Then, by introducing the compound chloroquine, an autophagy inhibitor, laboratory researchers were able to starve the cells.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">“We were tasked with using genomic sequencing to interrogate the hypothesis of the primary investigators,” Dr. Peng said. “We showed that, surprisingly, suppression of the KRAS gene actually increased, rather than decreased, the cells’ dependence on autophagy.”</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">The study was led by two researchers at the University of North Carolina (UNC) Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center — Dr. Channing Der, the Sarah Graham Kenan Professor of Pharmacology at the UNC School of Medicine, and the study’s senior author; and Dr. Kirsten Bryant, a Research Assistant Professor, and the study’s lead author.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">A clinical trial will be initiated at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston based on this study: Combination of ERK and autophagy inhibition as a treatment approach for pancreatic cancer.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">A similar clinical trial already has begun at the University of Utah’s Huntsman Cancer Institute, where researchers discovered findings complimentary to the UNC-led team. The University of Utah findings are described in a companion study — Protective autophagy elicited by RAF→MEK→ERK inhibition suggests a treatment strategy for RAS-driven cancers — also published today in Nature Medicine.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">“Autophagy is a process by which cancer cells recycle materials; rather than just getting rid of them, they reuse them as a source for nutrients,” said UNC’s Dr. Der. “What we found is if you cripple perhaps the most significant pathway for energy — glycolysis — the cancer cell really starts to suffer, and it ratchets up autophagy. We found a way to make pancreatic cancers more dependent on autophagy, and in consequence, more sensitive to an autophagy inhibitor.”</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">This year, it is estimated that nearly 46,000 Americans will die from pancreatic cancer, the nation's third leading cause of cancer-related death. Less than 10 percent survive more than 5 years after diagnosis. The cancer often is not detected until its late stages, when the cancer has spread to other organs and surgery is no longer an option.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">Researchers have known that a mutation in the KRAS gene is a critical driver of this cancer, but treatments that directly target the mutated gene have remained elusive. Finding ways to cut off the energy source for this cancer is one of the major directions for pancreatic cancer research.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">UNC’s Dr. Bryant said clinical studies are needed to determine if the treatment is tolerated and effective for patients. She began her work after losing her father to pancreatic cancer.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">“This may not cure pancreatic cancer, but it’s another step toward more treatment options,” Dr. Bryant said. “I’m going to keep improving this combination for future use and looking for other treatment strategies that could benefit pancreatic cancer patients.”</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">In addition to TGen and UNC, contributing to this study were: New York University, University of Texas, University of Michigan, University of Nebraska, Duke University, George Mason University, the Roswell Park Cancer Center, and former TGen investigator Dr. Nhan L. Tran of Mayo Clinic in Arizona.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">Funding for this study was provided by the National Cancer Institute, the U.S. Department of Defense, the Lustgarten Foundation, and the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network/American Association for Cancer Research (AACR). Individual researchers were supported by NCI, Pancreatic Cancer Action Network/AACR, American Cancer Society, and the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Foundation).​</span>​<br style="box-sizing:border-box;"></p> </div> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;float:none;height:20px;"></div> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="font-weight:700;box-sizing:border-box;">Source: <a style="color:rgb(32, 173, 149);background:transparent;font-family:hind, sans-serif;transition:all 0.2s ease-in-out 0s;box-sizing:border-box;" target="_blank" href="https://www.tgen.org/news/2019/march/04/tgen-discovers-how-to-starve-pancreatic-cancer/?page=2">https://www.tgen.org/news/2019/march/04/tgen-discovers-how-to-starve-pancreatic-cancer/?page=2</a>​</span> </p> <p> <br> </p> </html></div>2019-03-04T07:00:00ZTGen
Outbreak Of Paralyzing Disease Linked To Non-Polio Enterovirus Through TGEN-Led StudyOutbreak Of Paralyzing Disease Linked To Non-Polio Enterovirus Through TGEN-Led Study<div class="ExternalClass2921AF93AD7C4FC392BF9F925B49EDFD"><html> <p>​</p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;"> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;" class="ExternalClassC5C13FFCC5B14C2E8C8B3294815CBCAC"> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <img class="" style="border-width:0px;border-style:initial;width:1069.13px;max-width:100%;box-sizing:border-box;margin:5px;" alt="dave-engelthaler-horizontal.jpg" src="https://www.phoenix.gov/econdevsite/MediaAssets/dave-engelthaler-horizontal.jpg" /> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> <em style="box-sizing:border-box;">By Steve Yozwiak for Translational Genomics Research Institute, an affilate of City of Hope</em> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">The Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope, has identified a polio-like virus as a potential cause of an outbreak of a disease known as Acute Flaccid Myelitis (AFM), a crippling condition that causes muscle weakness and paralysis usually among children.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">At the request of Arizona and Maricopa County health officials, TGen was tasked with trying to identify the microbial cause of the outbreak of AFM among as many as 11 patients at a Phoenix-area hospital in September 2016.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">Using multiple genomic sequencing tests, TGen identified a specific non-polio enterovirus — EV-D68 — among at least four of the children, according to a study published today in the scientific journal mBio. The finding is significant because AFM cases are continuing to increase and there has been no official recognition that this disease is being caused by EV-D68, which limits the research community’s ability to develop preventative measures, such as new vaccines.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">“We clearly identified the presence of EV-D68 virus in the confirmed AFM patients,” said Dr. David Engelthaler, Co-Director of TGen’s Flagstaff-based Pathogen and Microbiome Division, TGen North, and the study’s senior author.</span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">Since there are no available tests for diagnosing EV-D68, TGen needed to apply numerous cutting-edge genomic analyses to different samples to help unravel the mystery.<br style="box-sizing:border-box;"></span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">“The results of this investigation significantly add to the growing body of evidence that AFM is associated with EV-D68 infection,” Dr. Engelthaler said.<br style="box-sizing:border-box;"></span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">AFM is a neuromuscular disorder that involves the spinal cord and messaging signals between the brain and muscle nerve cells. Symptoms include loss of muscle reflexes in arms and legs, resulting in a polio-like paralysis, but also include face drooping and respiratory failure.<br style="box-sizing:border-box;"></span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">Outbreaks of AFM in the U.S. since 2014 have come as the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the World Health Organization (WHO), are on the verge of eradicating poliovirus. In the early 1950s, polio afflicted as many as 15,000 children a year in the U.S.<br style="box-sizing:border-box;"></span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">Since the first polio vaccines were developed in 1955, the number of polio cases in the U.S. has dropped to zero. And, once numbering in the hundreds of thousands, the number of cases worldwide has dropped dramatically to the point that the disease has nearly been wiped out. Only 22 cases were reported worldwide in 2017, and the virus is now only found in two countries.<br style="box-sizing:border-box;"></span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">“The impending eradication of polio is one of the great achievements of human history,” Dr. Engelthaler said. “The current AFM outbreaks are a stark reminder, however, of the need for ongoing excellence in public health, medicine and research.”<br style="box-sizing:border-box;"></span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">For AFM, there is no confirmed cause, no vaccine and limited ways to diagnose or treat the disease. According to the CDC, it is unknown why most children recover from entroviruses, yet a small number develop AFM. The CDC has definitively ruled out the poliovirus as the cause of AFM. And, AFM remains rare, annually affecting fewer than 1 in 1 million children in the U.S.<br style="box-sizing:border-box;"></span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">“As a result of this study, we developed novel EV-D68 tests that now can be used for other investigations, and for larger-scale surveillance to better understand the spread of EV-D68 and its linkage to AFM,” said Dr. Jolene Bowers, a Research Assistant Professor at TGen North, and the study’s lead author.<br style="box-sizing:border-box;"></span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">Also contributing to this study were: Northern Arizona University, the Maricopa County Department of Public Health, and the Arizona Department of Health Services.<br style="box-sizing:border-box;"></span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">Authors of the study acknowledged Dr. Rebecca Sunenshine of the Maricopa County Department of Public Health and Dr. Sally Ann Iverson of the Arizona Department of Health Services “for their steadfast leadership in this outbreak response,” and Dr. Bonnie LaFleur of the University of Arizona for technical assistance and data analysis.<br style="box-sizing:border-box;"></span> </p> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="box-sizing:border-box;font-size:14.6667px;">This study — Genomic Analyses of Acute Flaccid Myelitis Cases Among a Cluster in Arizona Provide Further Evidence of Enterovirus D68 Role — was funded in part by contract 200-2016-92313 from the CDC under its Advanced Molecular Detection Initiative.</span> <br style="box-sizing:border-box;"> </p> </div> </div> <div style="box-sizing:border-box;font-family:"segoe ui", segoe, tahoma, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;float:none;height:20px;"></div> <p style="margin-bottom:5px;box-sizing:border-box;font-family:hind, "open sans", sans-serif !important;font-size:16px !important;line-height:18px !important;padding:0px 0px 15px !important;"> <span style="font-weight:700;box-sizing:border-box;">Source: <a style="color:rgb(32, 173, 149);background:transparent;font-family:hind, sans-serif;transition:all 0.2s ease-in-out 0s;box-sizing:border-box;" target="_blank" href="https://www.tgen.org/news/2019/january/22/tgen-led-study-implicates-ev-d68-virus-in-afm-outbreak/?page=2">https://www.tgen.org/news/2019/january/22/tgen-led-study-implicates-ev-d68-virus-in-afm-outbreak/?page=2</a>​</span> </p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span> <p> <br> </p> </html></div>2019-01-22T07:00:00ZTGen
UA College of Medicine – Phoenix Granted Full AccreditationUA College of Medicine – Phoenix Granted Full Accreditation<div class="ExternalClass74A420FA9DA54457A83F00B41EFDF6BE"><html> <p>http://phoenixmed.arizona.edu/about/news/ua-college-medicine-phoenix-granted-full-accreditation</p> <p>Wednesday, June 14, 2017</p> <p>The University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix has been granted full accreditation by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education, or LCME. The LCME is the national accrediting authority for medical education programs leading to MD degrees in the United States and Canada.</p> <p>"Earning full accreditation is an important milestone in the evolutionary history of the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix," said UA President Robert C. Robbins, MD, who is also a cardiothoracic surgeon. "Full accreditation assures students that they are getting an outstanding education, and it demonstrates to Arizona residents that the University of Arizona is graduating exceptional physicians."</p> <p>Kenneth S. Ramos, MD, PhD, interim dean of the UA College of Medicine – Phoenix, received a call last Friday from the LCME, notifying him that the college would move from provisional accreditation status to full accreditation. The LCME website (link is external) reflected this milestone on Monday.</p> <p>The LCME completed its latest site visit earlier this spring. The five-member team met with 120 faculty, students and staff during its four-day review of the college's medical education, research, clinical and community programs.</p> <p>"This significant milestone has been reached because of the collaborative spirit of our faculty and staff and the outstanding leadership of Dean Ramos," said Leigh A. Neumayer, MD, MS, FACS, interim senior vice president for the UA Health Sciences. "This announcement acknowledges the strength and excellence of this college and our ability to transform today's students into tomorrow's health care leaders."</p> <p>"The journey to full accreditation has been a labor of love for faculty, staff and students at the UA College of Medicine – Phoenix," Ramos said. "I am so proud of the hard work and commitment from the subcommittees and task force who worked countless hours to prepare for site visits and complete the extensive documentation required to gain full accreditation."</p> <p>The LCME will provide a comprehensive report within the next month detailing the site visit and the factors for granting full accreditation.</p> <p>"The UA College of Medicine – Phoenix is a special place that offers an innovative learning environment for tomorrow's physicians," Ramos said. "It is gratifying to see the LCME acknowledge our commitment to improving the health of all Arizona."</p> <p>All new medical schools undergo a rigorous process designed to standardize and optimize the quality of medical education across the U.S. and Canada. The first step in this process is "preliminary" accreditation, which the college received in 2012 and marked the point when students first were accepted as part of the separate accreditation. In 2015, the next step of "provisional" accreditation was granted, and now this final step of full accreditation. Each step involved subcommittees of faculty, staff and students reviewing all aspects of the college and the submission of hundreds of pages of documentation reviewing policies, data and details about the college. Given the challenges of the process, the college had projected to gain full accreditation in 2018.</p> <p>The LCME review focuses on what is in the best interest of the students. During the accreditation process, more than 100 performance elements are evaluated to establish whether a medical school is in good standing.</p> <p>Ten years ago, the UA College of Medicine – Phoenix was created to help meet the critical physician shortage in Arizona. Prior to beginning the separate accreditation process, it was a branch campus under the accreditation of the UA College of Medicine – Tucson and to date has graduated 354 physicians. Now the UA becomes one of only a few universities with two separate, fully accredited medical schools.</p> <p>Media Contacts:</p> <p>Chris Sigurdson (link sends e-mail), University Communications<br>Phone: 765-404-5959</p> <p>Marian Frank (link sends e-mail), UA College of Medicine – Phoenix<br>Phone: 602-827-2022</p> </html></div>https://biomedicalphoenix.com/Lists/News/Attachments/25/uofa.png2017-06-14T07:00:00ZUA
Applications open for 11th year of Helios Scholars at TGen biomedical research internshipsApplications open for 11th year of Helios Scholars at TGen biomedical research internships<div class="ExternalClass43F46D69990D4F07921472BF5551522A"><html> <p> <strong>​Summer program pairs Arizona students with TGen researchers in efforts to benefit patients</strong> </p> <p>PHOENIX, Ariz. — Jan. 4, 2017 — Following a successful 10th anniversary celebratory year, the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) today began accepting applications for the start of a second decade of Helios Scholars at TGen.</p> <p>Each summer, 45 students are selected for TGen’s flagship biomedical research internship program, supported by Helios Education Foundation.</p> <p>
Now entering its 11th year, Helios Scholars at TGen is an 8-week paid internship for Arizona students looking to further their interest in bioscience and medicine. Helios Scholars work in TGen's laboratories, receiving one-on-one mentorship from TGen scientists. These research projects aim for new discoveries about illnesses such as neurological disorders, infectious diseases and many types of cancer.</p> <p>

“We are excited about the start of a second decade of this significant collaboration with TGen,” said Paul J. Luna, President and CEO, Helios Education Foundation. “Helios Scholars at TGen is one of the most coveted bioscience internships in Arizona, providing intensive, hands-on learning to a diverse student population.”

</p> <p>Since the program began in 2007, 420 students have completed Helios Scholars at TGen. These scholars boast an array of impressive accomplishments, including acceptance into top tier graduate and medical schools, unique career developments, national awards and scholarships, and authorship credit in numerous scientific publications.<br>
<br>“Every class of Helios Scholars at TGen has big shoes to fill from the previous year's interns. We are looking for students who will rise to that challenge and take on a summer of scientific research to improve the lives of patients,” said Julie Euber, TGen’s Manager of Education and Outreach.</p> <p>In addition to patient-focused research, Helios Scholars participate in professional development seminars, including science communication, public speaking, and basic business etiquette, as well as social activities to build and strengthen relationships between students.
</p> <p>The internships are open to Arizona high school, undergraduate and graduate level students, including those in medical school.</p> <p>

Applications will be accepted through Feb. 10 at www.tgen.org/intern. For more information, contact Euber at 602-343-8459, or jeuber@tgen.org.</p> <p># # #</p> <p>About Helios Education Foundation
<br>Helios Education Foundation is dedicated to creating opportunities for individuals in Arizona and Florida to achieve a postsecondary education. Our work is driven by our four fundamental beliefs in Community, Investment, Equity and Partnership, and we invest in initiatives across the full education continuum.  <br>In Arizona, where Latino students comprise the largest percentage of the K-12 public school population, the Foundation is implementing its Arizona Latino Student Success initiative focused on preparing all students — especially students in high poverty, underserved Latino communities — for success. Through our Florida Regional Student Success Initiative, Helios is helping underserved, minority, first-generation students from the state’s large population centers in Miami, Orlando and Tampa achieve a postsecondary education.<br>Since 2006, the Foundation has invested over $185 million in education programs and initiatives in both states. To learn more about our efforts, visit us online at www.helios.org. </p> <p>Media Contact:<br>
Rebecca Lindgren<br>
Marketing Communications Director<br>
Helios Education Foundation<br>
602-381-2294<br>
rlindgren@helios.org</p> <p>About TGen<br>Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. TGen is focused on helping patients with neurological disorders, cancer, and diabetes, through cutting edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research towards patient benefit).  TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and rare complex diseases in adults and children. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities literally worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. TGen is allied with City of Hope, a world-renowned independent research and cancer and diabetes treatment center. This precision medicine alliance enables both institutes to complement each other in research and patient care, with City of Hope providing a significant clinical setting to advance scientific discoveries made by TGen. For more information, visit: www.tgen.org. Follow TGen on Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter @TGen.</p> <p>Media Contact:<br>Steve Yozwiak<br>TGen Senior Science Writer<br>602-343-8704<br>syozwiak@tgen.org</p> </html></div>2017-01-04T07:00:00ZTGen
Fox 10 - Medical mannequins allows med students to practice their skillsFox 10 - Medical mannequins allows med students to practice their skills<div class="ExternalClassE026B6DC8825493BAAD865354B12C896"><html> <p>​</p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-start" aria-hidden="true"></span> <p>http://www.fox10phoenix.com/news/arizona-news/217064356-story</p> <p>PHOENIX, Ariz. - There was a time when learning the practice of medicine required a student to work with live patients. Nowadays, a medical mannequin will allow students to practice the skills they learn.</p> <p>A medical mannequin has many of the same qualities as real people, but are not real.</p> <p>One of the mannequin, named "Patricia" is found at the Center for Simulation and Innovation at the University of Arizona College of Medicine in Phoenix.</p> <p>On the day we met Patricia, she "had" a heart attack.</p> <p>Students and faculty on the other side of a window looking out at Patricia provide her with a voice, and control her behaviors via computer, even how often she blinks her eyes.</p> <p>"Are you feeling sweaty now?" asked one person.</p> <p>"Yeah, I am" Patricia responded.</p> <p>The medical mannequin was made in Norway, which accounts for Patricia's fair complexion. Other mannequins come in different skin tones, to represent the full range of patients. Inside all of them is sophisticated technology. They almost look bionic.</p> <p>"She can blink, sweat, when we check pupils, they dilate and constrict. She can throw up on us, tongue swollen prevent us from airway drop her lungs. Collapsed lung, she can develop fluid around her heart and all signs and symptoms students will need to learn how to treat and manage," said Dr. Teresa Wu with the University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix.</p> <p>Wu said high-tech mannequins are a lot better than the way she learned her skills, during her time in medical school.</p> <p>"Prior to the advent of simulation technology, when I was training, we had to practice on live patients," said Wu. "So, the first time I did a central venous accessm I put a large needle into someone's neck, and that was on a live patient. Talk about pressure! So we wanted to find a better way"</p> <p>With Patricia, medical students can use her to master a couple of things: the base of medicine, and the muscle memory skill to do the procedures they need to do in real life.</p> <p>"The first time I tried to intubate Patricia, I couldn't get the tube in," said Katie Hawk. "Took three or four tries, but with help of faculty, the next three tries I got it each time."</p> <p>"Patricia and these models help us cultivate excellent muscle memory, so we can practice in no-risk environment, and we can keep trying until we get it, and we build perfect muscle memory for all the skills we will need in a clinical setting," said Nathan Goff</p> <p>The mannequins are useful, but they don't come cheap. Each cost between $20,000 to $180,000. Patricia is one of nine medical mannequins at the facility. There are also seven synthetic cadavers.<br></p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-end" aria-hidden="true"></span> </html></div>2016-11-11T07:00:00ZUA
Mini-Med School (October 12) with Dr. Martha Gulati: Women's Heart HealthMini-Med School (October 12) with Dr. Martha Gulati: Women's Heart Health<div class="ExternalClass5F30578086E24679BA0185290F617E4F"><html> <p>​</p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-start" aria-hidden="true"></span> <p>The University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix proudly organizes Mini-Medical School 3.0, a fascinating community lecture series open to the public.</p> <p>Heart disease is the #1 killer of women – just like men. Yet, bikini lines often define women’s health focusing on breasts and the reproductive system. Research specifically focused on women and cardiac care is several decades behind. At Mini-Medical School, Dr. Martha Gulati will lead a fascinating discussion sharing the vast differences between men and women and heart health. Dr. Gulati will answer the troubling questions, “Why were we so late to understand heart disease in women? And why women do worse than men in terms of heart disease?”</p> <p>Martha Gulati, MD, MS, FACC, FAHA<br>Division Chief of Cardiology for the UA College of Medicine – Phoenix<br>Physician Executive Director for the Banner – University Medicine Cardiovascular Institute</p> <p>Dr. Martha Gulati travels internationally as the leading expert on heart disease and women’s health. Her research has been featured in hundreds of newspapers across the world, including The New York Times and USA Today.</p> <p>She has also been featured on Oprah, CBS National News, The Today Show and many others. Dr. Gulati is the author of the best-seller, “Saving Women’s Hearts” and is the Editor-in-Chief of the American College of Cardiology “CardioSmart”, the patient education and empowerment initiative.</p> <p>Interactive Session: The second half of the event medical students will offer anatomy lessons with real pig hearts. Attendees will have the opportunity to learn about the functions of the heart up close.</p> <p>Mini-Medical School 3.0 is a community lecture series that is free and open to the public.  Guests will receive a small gift and light appetizers will be provided.</p> <p>REGISTER EARLY</p> <p> </p> <p>Wednesday, October 12<br>5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.<br>Virginia G. Piper Auditorium<br>600 E. Van Buren Street, Phoenix, AZ 85004</p> <p>Questions? Contact April Fischer at 602-827-2585 or aprilfischer@email.arizona.edu.<br></p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-end" aria-hidden="true"></span> </html></div>https://biomedicalphoenix.com/Lists/News/Attachments/19/uofa.png2016-09-14T07:00:00ZUA
TGen-NAU study generates Soviet anthrax pathogen genome from autopsy specimensTGen-NAU study generates Soviet anthrax pathogen genome from autopsy specimens<div class="ExternalClass2E0B4F39636843D8A29A780CEB0CA1B6"><html> <p> <strong>Next generation genomic analysis used to probe the former USSR’s biological weapons program</strong> </p> <p> <br>FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. — Sept. 7, 2016 — A new study by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) and Northern Arizona University (NAU) used deep DNA sequencing methods to generate the anthrax genome sequence from the victims of the 1979 anthrax outbreak in Sverdlovsk, Russia, when it was part of the USSR. </p> <p>The Soviet Union produced anthrax spores on an industrial scale but repeatedly denied the existence of their biological weapons program. This study, to be published in the September issue of the journal mBio, represents a precise and detailed examination of the anthrax strain used in their weapons development, and includes an anthrax genetic database that puts the weapons strain into a global context. </p> <p>“I have been studying this anthrax outbreak and these specimens for more than 20 years. Finally, using genomic technology, we could comprehensively characterize this pathogen genome,” said Dr. Paul Keim, a Regents Professor of Biology and the Cowden Endowed Chair of Microbiology at NAU, Director of TGen’s Pathogen Genomics Division, and the study’s lead author.</p> <p>“This is the signature agent of the world’s largest biological weapons program and now we have it in our genetic databases. Anywhere this strain shows up again, we will be able to identify it and track it back to its source. This is now an essential part of our forensic arsenal,” said Dr. Keim, who also is Director of NAU's Microbial Genetics & Genomics Center (MGGen).</p> <p>The anthrax bacterium produces small capsules, or spores, that can lie dormant for decades. After settling inside the human lung, for example, it can cause a severe disease that, if not treated with antibiotics, kills 90 percent of those it infects.</p> <p>Anthrax is found in many parts of the globe and dispersed through the human movement of animal parts contaminated with spores. Wool and hair from goats and sheep are moved globally as textiles or their precursors. When these originate in anthrax endemic regions, they can carry the spores, which are long-lived. While this bacterium has little variation from strain to strain, whole genome sequencing has identified DNA fingerprints that enable molecular epidemiology, tracing it to its source. When anthrax outbreaks occur, their whole genome profile are now routinely compared to the genetic database to identify possible sources and exclude others. This type of analysis was used by the FBI to track the spores in the 2001 anthrax letter attacks, which infected 22 people and killed five.</p> <p>The Soviet Union had signed the Biological Weapons convention that prohibited the use of biological agents, including anthrax, as weapons. The United States’ biological weapons program was eliminated in a decree by President Richard Nixon in 1969, but the Soviet program was maintained and expanded in a covert fashion for decades.</p> <p>In 1992, an investigative team from the United States led by noted Harvard biologist Dr. Matt Meselson characterized the 1979 Sverdlovsk outbreak by interviewing local physicians, visiting cemeteries and examining autopsy specimens. This investigation, along with accounts by Ken Alibek, a former Soviet scientist, revealed that the Sverdlovsk anthrax outbreak was due to an industrial accident.  A faulty filter at a Soviet spore production facility allowed anthrax spores, in a silent plume, to drift with the wind over the city and into the nearby countryside. Nearly 70 Sverdlovsk inhabitants died as far as three miles downwind from the facility, but more anthrax-susceptible farm animals died over 25 miles away. It remains the world’s deadliest human outbreak of inhalation anthrax.</p> <p>The bacterial genomes were generated from autopsy tissue specimens of two Sverdlovsk anthrax victims. These tissues were moved to the United States with permission of Sverdlovsk pathologists to continue the investigation into the disease outbreak. From these, it was established that the anthrax pathogen was detected within their tissues and the victims died from inhaling the spores.</p> <p>The Sverdlovsk anthrax genome was compared to the global genome database maintained by NAU to identify its close relatives and to look for evidence of genetic engineering. The Flagstaff research team found that this strain was closely related to other Asian isolates with very few differences to naturally occurring anthrax. There were no signs of genetic engineering. </p> <p>Dr. Keim notes that the Soviets had to be very meticulous to avoid mutant variants from dominating their production stock. Invariably when wild anthrax strains are grown extensively in the laboratory, they adapt to those conditions and lose the killing power.</p> <p>“The Sverdlovsk strain’s genome looked very much like those of wild strains we see across Asia,” Dr. Keim said.</p> <p>Dr. Meselson, who was not part of the current paper, notes: “If this strain had been grown repeated in the laboratory, it would have mutated to a form that had less virulence and less capacity to cause anthrax. The Soviet scientists must been very meticulous in their maintenance of the natural form.”</p> <p>Dr. Meselson, who is the Thomas Dudley Cabot Professor of the Natural Sciences at Harvard, is known for his 1961 discovery of messenger RNA. </p> <p>This study was supported by a grant from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.</p> <p># # #</p> <p>About NAU<br>Northern Arizona University is a high-research university with a statewide enrollment of 30,000 students. More than 20,000 students attend the Flagstaff campus, with more than 8,000 students enrolled online and at Extended Campus sites statewide. Research in genetics, forestry and ecology has drawn international recognition to the university, which also is highly regarded for its education, business and engineering programs. NAU launched competency-based Personalized Learning in 2013, the first self-paced, online education program that cuts the cost and time to an undergraduate degree. NAU is the host institution for the Center for Microbial Genetics and Genomics (MGGEN) where this study was performed. NAU has around 100 graduate students in the biological sciences. For more information, visit nau.edu. Follow NAU on Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram and Twitter.</p> <p>Media Contact:<br>Kimberly Ott    <br>Assistant to the President for Executive Communications and Media Relations <br>(928) 523-1894<br>Kimberly.Ott@nau.edu            </p> <p> <br>About TGen<br>Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. TGen is focused on helping patients with neurological disorders, cancer, and diabetes, through cutting edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research towards patient benefit).  TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and rare complex diseases in adults and children. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities literally worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: www.tgen.org. Follow TGen on Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter @TGen.</p> <p>Media Contact:<br>Steve Yozwiak<br>TGen Senior Science Writer<br>602-343-8704<br>syozwiak@tgen.org<br></p> </html></div>2016-09-07T07:00:00ZTGen
Study validates TGen developed test for healthcare-acquired infectionsStudy validates TGen developed test for healthcare-acquired infections<div class="ExternalClassCDA008753E9F4EBBBDB8460C8B570B82"><html> <strong>Molecular-based KlebSeq assay could save lives and lower healthcare costs</strong><p><br>FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. — Sept. 2, 2016 — A new study by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) details the design and validation of a low-cost, rapid and highly accurate screening tool — known as KlebSeq  — for potentially deadly healthcare-acquired infections (HAIs), such as Klebsiella pneumoniae. HAIs affect hundreds of thousands of patients annually and add nearly $10 billion in associated healthcare costs.</p> <p>The findings, to be published in the October issue of the Journal of Clinical Microbiology, detail the workings of the KlebSeq test at detecting HAIs earlier, in particular Klebsiella, which has multiple strains, such as ST258, which are increasingly resistant to treatment by antibiotics. </p> <p>Unlike traditional assays that require growing a live culture in a laboratory setting, which adds days to the testing process and layers on cost, KlebSeq employs a technique called amplicon sequencing that identifies the presence of Klebsiella and stratifies its characteristics, such as strain type and whether it may be antibiotic resistant.</p> <p>“KlebSeq is able to accurately and consistently identify and characterize Klebsiella from many different types of specimen samples, including blood, urine, nasal swabs, and respiratory fluids,” said Dr. Jolene Bowers, a Post-Doctoral fellow in TGen’s Pathogen Genomics Division, TGen North, and the paper’s first author.</p> <p>In 2015, Bowers co-led a study published in PLOS One, in collaboration with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which documented the rapid global spread of ST258.</p> <p>According to the CDC, nearly 2 million Americans annually contract bacterial infections that are resistant to at least one antibiotic, and 23,000 die each year from such infections, nearly twice as many who die of AIDS.</p> <p>“Improved testing technology holds great potential for the rapid detection of HAIs and more quickly identifying antibiotic-resistant infections, such as K. pneumoniae, which have become an urgent public health crisis,” said Bowers. “KlebSeq is a perfect example of the power of genomic-based analytical tools that deliver results faster, more accurately and at a lower cost.”</p> <p>According to Dr. David Engelthaler, Director of Programs and Operations for TGen North, and one of the authors of the study, transmission of multidrug-resistant strains of K. pneumoniae is rapid and without initial symptoms, leading to outbreaks in the healthcare system and the community that often go undetected.</p> <p>“Early detection of K. pneumoniae in healthcare patients, especially those with multidrug-resistant strains, is critical to infection control,” said Dr. Engelthaler, who also is a former epidemiologist for the state of Arizona. “Perhaps most concerning is that Kleb acts like a shuttle for critical resistance genes, often transmitting them to other HAI species. It is important for us to detect both the bacteria and these critical genes.”</p> <p>KlebSeq can be used for routine screening and surveillance, enabling healthcare staff to make more informed patient decisions, and curb outbreak situations by rapidly identifying transmissions prior patients showing signs of infection. Classifying the type of infection in each patient would help enable an institution to decide when and which intervention procedures to enact.</p> <p>Study results suggest that KlebSeq would be especially helpful for high-risk patients — those in intensive-care units, centers specializing in bone marrow transplantation or chronically immunosuppressed patients, long-term care facilities, and travelers returning from endemic regions.</p> <p>“The sensitivity of KlebSeq is superior to culture-based methods,” said Dr. Paul Keim, Director of TGen North and the senior author of the study.</p> <p>“KlebSeq is an important step toward a comprehensive, yet accessible, tool for all pathogen identification and characterization,” said Dr. Keim, who also is the Cowden Endowed Chair of Microbiology at Northern Arizona University, and Director of NAU's Center for Microbial Genetics and Genomics (MGGen).</p> <p>The results also suggest that KlebSeq could be easily modified to detect other healthcare-acquired infectious agents, and identify those with antimicrobial resistance. It could also be used for outbreak detection, transmission mapping and tracing the source of infections by being able to screen hundreds of patient samples simultaneously, at a cost of tens of dollars per patient.</p> <p>KlebSeq: A Diagnostic Tool for Surveillance, Detection, and Monitoring of Klebsiella pneumoniae, will be published in the October 2016 issue of the Journal of Clinical Microbiology.</p> <p># # #</p> <p>About TGen<br>Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. TGen is focused on helping patients with neurological disorders, cancer, and diabetes, through cutting edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research towards patient benefit).  TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and rare complex diseases in adults and children. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities literally worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: www.tgen.org. Follow TGen on Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter @TGen.</p> <p>Media Contact:<br>Steve Yozwiak<br>TGen Senior Science Writer<br>602-343-8704<br>syozwiak@tgen.org<br></p> <span aria-hidden="true" id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span> </html></div>2016-09-02T07:00:00ZTGen
Nov. 6 stepNout 5K aims for another $1 million for TGen cancer researchNov. 6 stepNout 5K aims for another $1 million for TGen cancer research<div class="ExternalClass93BF38BA36F14922BCB4E692C2F366B6"><html> <p> <strong>11th annual stepNout Run/Walk/Dash seeks end to pancreatic cancer, soon the nation’s 3rd leading cause of cancer death</strong></p> <p> <br>SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. — Aug. 25, 2016 — This year, pancreatic cancer is projected to eclipse breast cancer as the third leading cause of cancer-related death in the U.S. </p> <p>The Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is determined to reverse this trend in pancreatic cancer by enlisting the help of more than 1,000 participants at the 11th annual stepNout Run/Walk/Dash for pancreatic cancer research, Nov. 6 in Scottsdale.</p> <p>“We are incredibly grateful to the hundreds of volunteers who have truly accelerated the development of new treatments for pancreatic cancer,” said Michael Bassoff, President of the TGen Foundation. “These generous runners and community leaders have brought hope and answers to pancreatic cancer patients around the world.”</p> <p>Be sure to put on your running shoes for stepNout, a family-friendly morning of races, music, games, and activities — including a photo booth and face painting — all celebrating TGen’s efforts to stomp out pancreatic cancer.</p> <p>Dr. Daniel Von Hoff, TGen Distinguished Professor and Physician-In-Chief, said more effective treatments for pancreatic cancer are needed. Pancreatic cancer this year will take the lives of nearly 42,000 Americans, a more than 10 percent increase in the past 5 years.</p> <p>“The death rate for other leading cancers have been flat in recent years because of more effective treatments,” said Dr. Von Hoff. “We are making progress in treating patients with improvement in average survival and for the first time having some very long term survivors. We need continued, dedicated funding to improve on these promising results to our studies and benefit pancreatic patients who need our help now.”</p> <p>Median survival for patients with advanced disease was less than 6 months, and the 5-year survival rate was less than 10 percent. But thanks to fundraising efforts like stepNout, these statistics are improving.</p> <p>Under Dr. Von Hoff's leadership, and in collaboration with HonorHealth, TGen pioneered a major international clinical trial that led the FDA in 2013 approved the use of Abraxane in combination with gemcitabine, which now is the nation’s standard of care for this disease. Two ongoing TGen-led studies are showing even greater promise, with tumor reductions of at least 30 percent in 3 in 4 patients, and the elimination of tumors in 1 in 5 patients.</p> <p>Competitive and fun races at stepNout are geared for all ages and abilities, including the event’s signature 5K run. Online registration ends Nov. 1, though participants can register at the event. This is the third year stepNout will be at the Scottsdale Sports Complex, northeast of Bell and Hayden roads.</p> <p>The annual event has raised more than $1 million since it started in 2006. Nearly $135,000 was raised last year, and organizers are aiming for $150,000 this year on their way towards an overall goal of $2 million.</p> <p>And you don’t have to be at stepNout to help. You can donate at www.tgenfoundation.org/step.</p> <p>*</p> <p>If you go to stepNout:</p> <p>
What: TGen's 11th annual stepNout Run/Walk/Dash for pancreatic cancer research.
<br>Where: Scottsdale Sports Complex, 8081 E. Princess Drive, northeast of Hayden and Bell roads, between Loop 101 and Frank Lloyd Wright Boulevard.
<br>When: 7:30-11 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 6.  Registration starts at 7:30 a.m.; a competitive 5K run begins at 9 a.m.; a fun 1-mile run/walk starts at 9:15 a.m.; a free 50-yard kids' dash is planned for 10:30 a.m.
<br>Cost: Registration fees range from $10 to $30, depending on age. Costs increase by $5 after Oct. 21. Children ages 5 and under are free.<br>Parking: Free.
<br>More information and registration: www.tgenfoundation.org/step and click on events. Contact Andrea Daly at (602) 343-8572 or by email at adaly@tgen.org.</p> <p># # #</p> <p>About TGen<br>Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. TGen is focused on helping patients with neurological disorders, cancer, and diabetes, through cutting edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research towards patient benefit).  TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and rare complex diseases in adults and children. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities literally worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: www.tgen.org. Follow TGen on Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter @TGen.</p> <p>Media Contact:<br>Steve Yozwiak<br>TGen Senior Science Writer<br>602-343-8704<br>syozwiak@tgen.org<br></p> <span aria-hidden="true" id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span> </html></div>2016-08-25T07:00:00ZTGen
Med School Welcomes Pharmacy Cohort to Phoenix CampusMed School Welcomes Pharmacy Cohort to Phoenix Campus<div class="ExternalClassCB7F60E6FD7248059298705D5CA2585E"><html> <p>The University of Arizona welcomed its first class of beginning pharmacy students to the Phoenix Biomedical Campus (link is external) last week.  Twenty-three aspiring pharmacists have been selected to complete four years of professional study from the downtown campus.</p> <p>The first-year Phoenix students are part of a class that totals 111. They join 88 first-year doctor of pharmacy students who will simultaneously complete the same programs from the Tucson campus of the University of Arizona College of Pharmacy. The semester began Monday, Aug. 22. </p> <p>Thanks to distance-learning technology, Phoenix students in the Class of 2020 attend the same lectures as their Tucson counterparts. Classrooms in both locations are equipped for "synchronous learning," meaning lectures are broadcast in real time, with two-way communication at both locations. On-campus faculty at each location lead case discussions and clinical teaching. </p> <p>A pharmacy-practice laboratory where students can learn about compounding also has been established in the Health Sciences Education Building on the Phoenix campus. It is similar to a lab that has been in place on the Tucson campus for about a decade.</p> <p>A staff of six College of Pharmacy employees, including three faculty members, will guide students through this first year of the full pharmacy program on the Phoenix campus.</p> <p>Not quite 75 percent of the Phoenix–based pharmacy students listed addresses in the Phoenix metropolitan area when they applied to the College of Pharmacy several months ago. Staying in the city they knew for their professional education was important to many.</p> <p><strong>Michelle Ciambella</strong>, who went to Arizona State University as an undergraduate and says her life is centered in Phoenix, is delighted to be enrolled in a premier school within walking distance of her residence.  Fellow ASU graduate <strong>Nina Dimitrova </strong>describes being in Phoenix as “big for me.”  Staying in the metropolis was an important factor in planning her professional education, she says. Classmate <strong>Nate Evans</strong> has lived in Phoenix his entire life, and would have chosen the other pharmacy school in Arizona for his PharmD education had UA COP not initiated a Phoenix component of its program. </p> <p>Other students wanted to go back to the state capital after time away. <strong>Saba Maghari </strong>lived in Tucson while completing a bachelor’s degree in chemistry at the University of Arizona, and knew she wanted to apply to the highly ranked UA doctor of pharmacy program when she decided to become a pharmacist. The opening of COP’s Phoenix-based component this year offered her an added bonus: studying in the same town where an aunt and two uncles already practice pharmacy and where there are multiple job opportunities for her both as a student and after she graduates.</p> <p>“Having a Phoenix cohort as part of our nationally recognized four-year pharmacy program is one of the ways we expand the options for our students,” <strong>Rick G. Schnellmann</strong>, dean of the college, says. “We are very pleased to have a full curriculum available in the population center of our state. The aim is to support a cohesive group of students who will have very similar learning and extracurricular experiences whether they are in Maricopa County or Pima County.”</p> <p><em>For more information about studying pharmacy on the Phoenix Biomedical Campus, </em><a target="_blank" href="http://www.pharmacy.arizona.edu/pharmd/phxpharmd"><em>visit this page</em></a><em>.</em></p> </html></div>https://biomedicalphoenix.com/Lists/News/Attachments/18/uafirstcohort.jpg2016-08-23T07:00:00ZUA
U.S. issues patent for Valley Fever detection technology developed by TGen and NAUU.S. issues patent for Valley Fever detection technology developed by TGen and NAU<div class="ExternalClass5E5380FBB1494DFE8453AE56B6D779D9"><html> <p>​</p> <h4 class="o_gEPV1NTWQkXX0HDg_0 as_gEPV1NTWQkXX0HDg_0 inheritFontFamily"> <em> <span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;"> <strong> <font size="5" color="#000000"> <span aria-hidden="true" id="ms-rterangecursor-start"></span> <span aria-hidden="true" id="ms-rterangecursor-end"></span>Test for dust-borne fungal infection created by TGen and NAU is licensed to DxNA </font> </strong> </span> </em> </h4> <h4 class="o_gEPV1NTWQkXX0HDg_0 as_gEPV1NTWQkXX0HDg_0 inheritFontFamily"> <font size="3" face="Times New Roman"> </font> <p> <strong> <span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;font-size:10pt;">PHOENIX, Ariz. — Aug. 2, 2016 —</span> </strong> <span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;font-size:10pt;"> Valley Fever, a potentially deadly dust-borne fungal disease, should be easier to diagnose and treat thanks to a testing technology developed by the <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=gsFIgbmnoMs%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=http://www.tgen.org/" title="Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen)"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen)</font></span></a> and Northern Arizona University (NAU), and now protected by a patent issued today by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.<br> <br> TGen and NAU have exclusively licensed this technology to DxNA LLC, a company based in St. George, Utah, which plans to make this Valley Fever Test commercially available to hospitals and clinics upon completion of FDA clinical trials and a subsequent FDA 510(k) submission for review and clearance later this year.<br> <br> Valley Fever is endemic to Phoenix and Tucson, but also is <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=gsFIgbmnoMs%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=http://www.tgen.org/home/news/2016-media-releases/tgen-tracks-spread-of-valley-fever.aspx%23.V5-uWY7a5DM" title="spreading throughout the arid regions of North and South America"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">spreading throughout the arid regions of North and South America</font></span></a>. It is an infection caused by the microscopic fungus Coccidioides, a pathogen that lives in desert soils and typically enters the body through the lungs. An estimated 150,000 Americans are infected annually by Valley Fever, and as many as 500 die each year.<br> <br> “Currently, there is no definitive test for Valley Fever. Our new rapid, 1-hour, genetic-based test will provide physicians and patients with a precise diagnosis, enabling prompt treatment and preventing this disease from becoming more serious,” said Dr. Paul Keim, Director of TGen's Pathogen Genomics Division, or TGen North, based in Flagstaff.<br> <br> “For the past decade, TGen has worked to develop better tools and technology to address Valley Fever, and we think it is critical to be able to apply our cutting-edge science to problems in our own backyard,” said Dr. Keim, who also is the Cowden Endowed Chair of Microbiology at NAU, and Director of NAU's Center for Microbial Genetics and Genomics (MGGen).<br> <br> Valley Fever most commonly causes a progressive lung infection, but can also spread to other parts of the body, including the skin, bone, brain and the rest of the nervous system.<br> <br> Nearly 60 percent of those infected by Valley Fever — including other vertebrates, and especially dogs — develop no significant symptoms. However, some patients develop highly debilitating symptoms, such as cough, fever and fatigue. These symptoms are similar to other respiratory diseases caused by bacteria or virus, and often lead to delayed diagnoses and inappropriate treatment. Very severe Valley Fever can require lifelong treatment with antifungal drugs, and even result in death.<br> <br> This new genetic-based test can precisely identify both strains of Valley Fever: Coccidioides posadasii, found in Arizona, New Mexico, Texas and much of Latin America, and Coccidioides immitus, which is found in California, Washington and Baja Mexico.<br> <br> Most infections occur in central and southern Arizona. Each year on average, there are an estimated 150,000 cases in Arizona, resulting in more than 1,700 hospitalizations at a cost of more than $86 million.<br> <br> “These high costs are driven to a significant degree by the high level of misdiagnosis, resulting in an average time to diagnosis of 5 months from when a patient first seeks care,” said David Taus, CEO of DxNA LLC. “Our test provides definitive results in 60 minutes, dramatically improving the diagnosis of the disease over current methodologies, both in terms of time and accuracy.”<br> <br> The intellectual property used in DxNA’s Valley Fever Test is exclusive to DxNA LLC, and covers both human and <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=gsFIgbmnoMs%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=http://www.tgen.org/home/news/2016-media-releases/owners-register-dogs-to-help-treat-valley-fever.aspx%23.V5-yy47a5DM" title="veterinary applications"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">veterinary applications</font></span></a>, Taus said.<br> <br> # # #<br> <br> <strong><span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;">About TGen</span></strong><br> Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. TGen is focused on helping patients with neurological disorders, cancer, and diabetes, through cutting edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research towards patient benefit).  TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and rare complex diseases in adults and children. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities literally worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=gsFIgbmnoMs%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=http://www.tgen.org/home.aspx" title="Home"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">www.tgen.org</font></span></a>. Follow TGen on <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=gsFIgbmnoMs%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=https://www.facebook.com/helptgen" title="Facebook"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">Facebook</font></span></a>, <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=gsFIgbmnoMs%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=https://www.linkedin.com/company/tgen" title="LinkedIn"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">LinkedIn</font></span></a> and <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=gsFIgbmnoMs%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=https://twitter.com/TGen" title="Twitter @TGen"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">Twitter @TGen</font></span></a>.<br> <br> <strong><span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;">Media Contact:</span></strong><br> Steve Yozwiak<br> TGen Senior Science Writer<br> 602-343-8704<br> <a target="_blank" href="mailto:syozwiak@tgen.org" title="syozwiak@tgen.org"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">syozwiak@tgen.org<br></font><font color="#0092e6"> </font></span></a><br> <strong><span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;">About DxNA LLC</span></strong></span> <strong> <span style="font-family:"ms gothic";font-size:10pt;">
</span> </strong> <span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;font-size:10pt;"> <br> DxNA is a privately held company located in St. George Utah. It is a molecular diagnostics company that develops and distributes portable, fully-integrated systems and tests for infectious disease in the medical, agricultural, food safety, and biosecurity markets. The Company's systems and technologies enable rapid and precise molecular testing to take place on-site by allowing for otherwise complex laboratory procedures to be performed almost anywhere. DxNA's patented GeneSTAT® portable Real Time PCR molecular diagnostic testing system will allow individuals with minimal training to conduct accurate real-time diagnostic testing in virtually any location including laboratories, clinics, physician offices, emergency rooms or field settings. Designed with economy in mind, GeneSTAT is inherently less costly than the real time PCR systems typical of clinical laboratories.<br> <br> <strong><span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;">About Northern Arizona University</span></strong><br> Northern Arizona University is a high-research university with a statewide enrollment of 28,000 students. More than 20,000 students attend the Flagstaff campus, with 8,000 students enrolled online and at Extended Campus sites statewide. Research in genetics, forestry and ecology has drawn international recognition to the university, which also is highly regarded for its education, business and engineering programs. NAU launched competency-based Personalized Learning in 2013, the first self-paced, online education program that cuts the cost and time to an undergraduate degree.</span> </p> <font size="3" face="Times New Roman"> </font> </h4> </html></div>2016-08-02T07:00:00ZTGen
10th class of bioscience interns complete Helios Scholars at TGen10th class of bioscience interns complete Helios Scholars at TGen<div class="ExternalClass323C0472E87549D1861AE40BBD6CDD76"><html> <p>​</p> <span aria-hidden="true" id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span> <h4 class="o_gEPV1NTWQkXX0HDg_0 as_gEPV1NTWQkXX0HDg_0 inheritFontFamily"> <font size="3" face="Times New Roman"> </font> </h4> <h2 style="margin:0.83em 0in;"> <span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;"> <strong> <font size="5" color="#000000">Hands-on biomedical research internships pair students with TGen researchers to help advance discoveries that can benefit patients</font> </strong> </span> </h2> <h4 class="o_gEPV1NTWQkXX0HDg_0 as_gEPV1NTWQkXX0HDg_0 inheritFontFamily"> <font size="3" face="Times New Roman"> </font> <p> <strong> <span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;font-size:10pt;">PHOENIX, Ariz. — July 29, 2016 —</span> </strong> <span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;font-size:10pt;"> Celebrating the program’s 10th year, the 2016 Helios Scholars at TGen completed their eight-week internships today with a daylong scientific symposium at the Hyatt Regency Phoenix.<br> <br> The collaboration between the Helios Education Foundation and the <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=h5e0N01kzUU%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=http://www.tgen.org/" title="Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen)"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen)</font></span></a> graduated 44 students who will help form the next generation of scientists specializing in Arizona’s growing biomedical fields.<br> <br> “This 10th anniversary year of Helios Scholars at TGen represents a milestone in this innovative program, which has helped launch the careers of many promising and talented researchers and physicians,” said Dr. Jeffrey Trent, TGen President and Research Director. “In partnership with Helios, these students have experienced what it is like to pursue patient-centric research on the frontier of genomic medicine.”<br> <br> Helios Scholars at TGen is the research institute’s flagship summer internship program for Arizona students looking to further their interest in bioscience and medicine. Helios Scholars work in TGen’s laboratories — receiving one-on-one mentorship from TGen scientists — on research projects that aim for new molecular-level discoveries about neurological disorders, infectious diseases and many types of cancer.<br> <br> More than 400 students have now graduated the program since its inception in 2007.<br> <br> "We are proud of the impact Helios Scholars at TGen has had on the lives of hundreds of talented students in Arizona,” said Paul J. Luna, President and CEO, Helios Education Foundation. “This program provides this diverse student population with a unique opportunity to immerse themselves in an intensive, hands-on, scientific learning experience, and it propels them toward achieving success in college and career.  We look forward to the next 10 years, and beyond, of this impactful program.”<br> <br> The full-time, paid internships are open to Arizona high school, undergraduate and graduate level students, including those in medical school. From more than 500 student applications, 33 undergraduates, 1 graduate student and 10 high school students were selected this summer.<br> <br> Students hail from many schools and backgrounds, including Arizona State University, the University of Arizona, Northern Arizona University, Phoenix College, and these Arizona high schools: BASIS Chandler, Bioscience, Desert Vista, Hamilton, Phoenix Country Day, South Ridge, Sunnyslope, Tempe Preparatory and Xavier College Preparatory. Five students currently attend out-of-state colleges. <br> <br> In addition to patient-focused research, Helios Scholars participate in professional development seminars, including science communication, public speaking, and basic business etiquette, as well as social activities to build and strengthen relationships between students. This summer’s program concluded today with a scientific symposium highlighting the accomplishments of the 2016 Helios Scholars at TGen. <br> <br> Scholars boast an array of impressive accomplishments including acceptance into top tier graduate and medical schools, unique career developments, national awards and scholarships, and authorship credit in numerous scientific publications.<br> <br> Applications for the 11th class of Helios Scholars at TGen will be accepted starting in January 2017 at <a href="http://www.tgen.org/intern" target="_blank"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">www.tgen.org/intern</font></span></a>. For more information, contact Julie Euber, TGen Education and Outreach Specialist, at 602-343-8459, or <a target="_blank" href="mailto:jeuber@tgen.org" title="jeuber@tgen.org"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">jeuber@tgen.org</font></span></a>.<br> <br> # # #<br> <br> <strong><span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;">About Helios Education Foundation</span></strong><br> Helios Education Foundation is focused on creating opportunities for individuals in Arizona and Florida to succeed in postsecondary education by advancing the academic preparedness of all students and fostering a high-expectation, college-going culture. Through a decade of strategic partnership and investment, Helios has identified Early Grade Success, College and Career Readiness and Postsecondary Completion as the three most critical reform priorities in achieving our long term goal. As an engaged foundation, embedded in communities across both states, the Foundation is contributing its expertise and financial resources to better prepare students for college and career in a globally-competitive economy. Since 2006, Helios has invested nearly $170 million in education-related programs and initiatives in Arizona and Florida. For more information about the Foundation, visit <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=h5e0N01kzUU%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=http://www.helios.org/" title="www.helios.org"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">www.helios.org</font></span></a>.<br> <br> <strong><span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;">Media Contact:</span></strong></span> <strong> <span style="font-family:"ms gothic";font-size:10pt;">
</span> </strong> <span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;font-size:10pt;"> <br> Rebecca Lindgren<br> </span> <span style="font-family:"ms gothic";font-size:10pt;">
</span> <span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;font-size:10pt;">Marketing Communications Director<br> </span> <span style="font-family:"ms gothic";font-size:10pt;">
</span> <span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;font-size:10pt;">Helios Education Foundation</span> <span style="font-family:"ms gothic";font-size:10pt;">
</span> <span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;font-size:10pt;"> <br> 602-381-2294<br> <a target="_blank" href="mailto:rlindgren@helios.org" title="rlindgren@helios.org"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">rlindgren@helios.org</font></span></a><br> <br> <strong><span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;">About TGen</span></strong><br> Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. TGen is focused on helping patients with neurological disorders, cancer, and diabetes, through cutting edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research towards patient benefit).  TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and rare complex diseases in adults and children. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities literally worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=h5e0N01kzUU%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=http://www.tgen.org/home.aspx" title="Home"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">www.tgen.org</font></span></a>. Follow TGen on <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=h5e0N01kzUU%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=https://www.facebook.com/helptgen" title="Facebook"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">Facebook</font></span></a>, <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=h5e0N01kzUU%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=https://www.linkedin.com/company/tgen" title="LinkedIn"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">LinkedIn</font></span></a> and <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=h5e0N01kzUU%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=https://twitter.com/TGen" title="Twitter @TGen"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">Twitter @TGen</font></span></a>.<br> <br> <strong><span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;">Media Contact:</span></strong><br> Steve Yozwiak<br> TGen Senior Science Writer<br> 602-343-8704<br> <a target="_blank" href="mailto:syozwiak@tgen.org" title="syozwiak@tgen.org"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">syozwiak@tgen.org</font></span></a></span> </p> <font size="3" face="Times New Roman"> <span aria-hidden="true" id="ms-rterangecursor-start"></span><span aria-hidden="true" id="ms-rterangecursor-end"></span></font> </h4> <span aria-hidden="true" id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span> </html></div>2016-07-29T07:00:00ZTGen
Cycle for the Cure raises a record $248,725 for cancer research at TGenCycle for the Cure raises a record $248,725 for cancer research at TGen<div class="ExternalClassFDD54BF4182942B1BA4F283477CE5CFA"><html> <p>​</p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-start" aria-hidden="true"></span> <h4 class="o_gEPV1NTWQkXX0HDg_0 as_gEPV1NTWQkXX0HDg_0 inheritFontFamily"> <font face="Times New Roman" size="3"> </font> </h4> <h2 style="margin:0.83em 0in;"> <em> <span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;"> <strong> <font color="#000000" size="5">Philanthropists Sherry and Richard Holson are instrumental in securing $100,000 in donations from Guarantee Trust Life</font> </strong> </span> </em> </h2> <h4 class="o_gEPV1NTWQkXX0HDg_0 as_gEPV1NTWQkXX0HDg_0 inheritFontFamily"> <font face="Times New Roman" size="3"> </font> <p> <strong> <span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;font-size:10pt;">PHOENIX, Ariz. — July 27, 2016 —</span> </strong> <span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;font-size:10pt;"> This year’s <em><span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;">Cycle for the Cure</span></em> already was on track to be one of the most successful in its six years of raising cancer research funds for the non-profit <a title="Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen)" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=2SMnw6vB7Z8%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=http://www.tgen.org/" target="_blank"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen)</font></span></a>.<br> <br> But thanks to additional donations generated by Guarantee Trust Life of Glenview, Ill., the 6th annual <em><span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;">Cycle for the Cure</span></em> garnered a record $248,725 for TGen.<br> <br> The May 1 event, which featured hundreds of dedicated donors spinning on stationary cycles for up to 2 hours at several health clubs in Phoenix and Scottsdale, produced $173,725. <br> <br> But Vicki Vaughn, Co-Chair of <em><span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;">Cycle for the Cure</span></em>, wasn’t finished.<br> <br> After introducing her friends — Richard S. Holson III, Chairman, CEO and President of Guarantee Trust Life, and his wife, Sherry — to TGen, the Holson’s company invited TGen cancer researcher Dr. Will Hendricks and TGen Foundation Vice President Erin Massey to present at Guarantee Trust Life’s recent company conference in Arizona. The company was impressed and donated $25,000, part of the initial tally for <em><span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;">Cycle for the Cure</span></em>.<br> <br> Then, after company officials toured TGen laboratories, they challenged their partners and representatives to donate to <em><span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;">Cycle for the Cure</span></em>. They raised a combined $37,500, which Guarantee Trust Life matched, dollar-for-dollar, adding another $75,000 to the $25,000 the company already donated, bringing the total generated by Guarantee Trust Life to $100,000.<br> <br> "TGen should be very grateful to my wife, Sherry, and Vicki Vaughn as they were responsible for introducing my company to this amazing organization. We were impressed with, and inspired by, the remarkable people at TGen and the world-class, life-changing research being conducted," said Richard Holson. "And the response by our agents with their contributions was great."<br> <br> Using genomic sequencing, TGen helps doctors match the appropriate therapy to each patient's DNA profile, producing the greatest patient benefit. This year, <em><span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;">Cycle for the Cure</span></em> raised research funds for work on a revolutionary diagnostic method called “liquid biopsies” — biomarkers in circulating blood — as a means of providing patients and their doctors with early detection of disease.<br> <br> “We believe everyone should know first-hand about the groundbreaking research going on at TGen, and we encourage everyone to join us in supporting the vital work TGen does,” said Vicki Vaughn, who co-chaired <em><span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;">Cycle for the Cure</span></em> with Robyn DeBell.<br> <br> Village Health Clubs and Studio 360 provided the venues for this year’s <em><span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;">Cycle for the Cure</span></em>. In addition, yoga and kinesis classes were included in the fundraising events by Village Health Clubs at its DC Ranch and Camelback locations. <br> <br> “We are incredibly proud to have merited the dedicated support of volunteer co-chairs Vicki Vaughn and Robyn DeBell,” said TGen Foundation President Michael Bassoff. “Their extraordinary leadership, and the generosity of business leaders like Rick Holman and the Guarantee Trust Life company, provides an incredible boost to TGen's cancer research initiatives.”<br> <br> Donations continue to be accepted at <a title="www.tgenfoundation.org/cycle" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=2SMnw6vB7Z8%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=http://events.tgen.org/site/TR?fr_id%3d1200%26amp%3bpg%3dentry" target="_blank"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">www.tgenfoundation.org/cycle</font></span></a>. And save the date for next year’s 7th annual Cycle for the Cure: April 30, 2017.<br> <br> # # #<br> <br> <strong><span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;">About TGen</span></strong><br> Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. TGen is focused on helping patients with neurological disorders, cancer, and diabetes, through cutting edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research towards patient benefit).  TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and rare complex diseases in adults and children. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities literally worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: <a title="Home" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=2SMnw6vB7Z8%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=http://www.tgen.org/home.aspx" target="_blank"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">www.tgen.org</font></span></a>. Follow TGen on <a title="Facebook" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=2SMnw6vB7Z8%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=https://www.facebook.com/helptgen" target="_blank"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">Facebook</font></span></a>, <a title="LinkedIn" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=2SMnw6vB7Z8%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=https://www.linkedin.com/company/tgen" target="_blank"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">LinkedIn</font></span></a> and <a title="Twitter @TGen" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=2SMnw6vB7Z8%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=https://twitter.com/TGen" target="_blank"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">Twitter @TGen</font></span></a>.<br> <br> <strong><span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;">Media Contact:</span></strong><br> Steve Yozwiak<br> TGen Senior Science Writer<br> 602-343-8704<br> <a title="syozwiak@tgen.org" href="mailto:syozwiak@tgen.org" target="_blank"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">syozwiak@tgen.org</font></span></a></span> </p> <font face="Times New Roman" size="3"> </font> <span style="color:black;font-family:"arial",sans-serif;font-size:10pt;"> <img style="margin:5px;width:1px;" src="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackpixel.aspx?nid=2SMnw6vB7Z8%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d" border="0" /> </span> </h4> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-end" aria-hidden="true"></span> </html></div>2016-07-27T07:00:00ZTGen
Phoenix Business Journal - What's next for the 15-year-old Phoenix Biomedical CampusPhoenix Business Journal - What's next for the 15-year-old Phoenix Biomedical Campus<div class="ExternalClassEE5719C12E0143968CF7EC82623BC94E"><html> <p>​<a target="_blank" href="http://www.bizjournals.com/phoenix/blog/health-care-daily/2016/07/whats-next-for-the-15-year-old-phoenix-biomedical.html">http://www.bizjournals.com/phoenix/blog/health-care-daily/2016/07/whats-next-for-the-15-year-old-phoenix-biomedical.html</a></p> <p class="content__segment" style="font:18px/27px acta, georgia, "times new roman", serif;color:rgb(34, 34, 34);text-transform:none;text-indent:0px;letter-spacing:normal;word-spacing:0px;white-space:normal;box-sizing:border-box;widows:1;font-size-adjust:none;font-stretch:normal;">he Phoenix Biomedical Campus has grown to 1.6 million square feet on 28 acres since its inception 15 years ago — and there is even more construction planned for the downtown Phoenix campus.</p> <p class="content__segment" style="font:18px/27px acta, georgia, "times new roman", serif;color:rgb(34, 34, 34);text-transform:none;text-indent:0px;letter-spacing:normal;word-spacing:0px;white-space:normal;box-sizing:border-box;widows:1;font-size-adjust:none;font-stretch:normal;">Banner Health, the state's largest health system, plans to build a clinic on or near the campus similar to its other nine primary care clinics throughout the Phoenix area. Last year, the Phoenix nonprofit forged an academic-medical partnership with University of Arizona with the<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span><a style="transition:color 100ms ease-out, border-color 100ms ease-out;color:rgb(37, 79, 156);text-decoration:none;border-bottom-width:1px;border-bottom-style:solid;box-sizing:border-box;" href="http://www.bizjournals.com/phoenix/print-edition/2015/04/10/what-1-2-billion-means-to-banner-ua-and-the-state.html" target="_blank">$1.2 billion purchase of the University of Arizona Health Network</a>.</p> <p class="content__segment" style="font:18px/27px acta, georgia, "times new roman", serif;color:rgb(34, 34, 34);text-transform:none;text-indent:0px;letter-spacing:normal;word-spacing:0px;white-space:normal;box-sizing:border-box;widows:1;font-size-adjust:none;font-stretch:normal;"> <span style="font:18px/27px acta, georgia, "times new roman", serif;color:rgb(34, 34, 34);text-transform:none;text-indent:0px;letter-spacing:normal;word-spacing:0px;float:none;display:inline !important;white-space:normal;widows:1;font-size-adjust:none;font-stretch:normal;">Last year, the city of Phoenix authorized a deal that will allow Arizona State University to develop a<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></span> <a style="font:18px/27px acta, georgia, "times new roman", serif;outline:0px;transition:color 100ms ease-out, border-color 100ms ease-out;color:rgb(32, 69, 135);text-transform:none;text-indent:0px;letter-spacing:normal;text-decoration:none;word-spacing:0px;border-bottom-width:1px;border-bottom-style:solid;white-space:normal;box-sizing:border-box;widows:1;font-size-adjust:none;font-stretch:normal;" href="http://www.bizjournals.com/phoenix/blog/health-care-daily/2015/05/phoenix-agrees-to-asu-nantworks-biomedical-project.html" target="_blank">health solutions campus</a> <span style="font:18px/27px acta, georgia, "times new roman", serif;color:rgb(34, 34, 34);text-transform:none;text-indent:0px;letter-spacing:normal;word-spacing:0px;float:none;display:inline !important;white-space:normal;widows:1;font-size-adjust:none;font-stretch:normal;"> <span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span>on seven acres north of Filmore Street. Phase I of that project is a 200,000-square-foot building to be built in partnership with California-based NantWorks LLC, which is owned by billionaire Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong.</span> </p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-start" aria-hidden="true"></span> <p class="content__segment" style="font:18px/27px acta, georgia, "times new roman", serif;color:rgb(34, 34, 34);text-transform:none;text-indent:0px;letter-spacing:normal;word-spacing:0px;white-space:normal;box-sizing:border-box;widows:1;font-size-adjust:none;font-stretch:normal;">The city has executed a lease agreement with ASU for that first phase, said<a target="_blank" style="transition:color 100ms ease-out, border-color 100ms ease-out;color:rgb(37, 79, 156);text-decoration:none;border-bottom-width:1px;border-bottom-style:solid;box-sizing:border-box;" href="http://www.bizjournals.com/phoenix/search/results?q=Robyn%20Sahid">Robyn Sahid</a>, program manager for the city of Phoenix.</p> <p class="content__segment" style="font:18px/27px acta, georgia, "times new roman", serif;color:rgb(34, 34, 34);text-transform:none;text-indent:0px;letter-spacing:normal;word-spacing:0px;white-space:normal;box-sizing:border-box;widows:1;font-size-adjust:none;font-stretch:normal;">Also last year, the Phoenix City Council authorized the city to enter an agreement with University of Arizona to allow UA to have development rights on about three acres' worth of building pads located between Fillmore,<a target="_blank" style="transition:color 100ms ease-out, border-color 100ms ease-out;color:rgb(37, 79, 156);text-decoration:none;border-bottom-width:1px;border-bottom-style:solid;box-sizing:border-box;" href="http://www.bizjournals.com/phoenix/search/results?q=Van%20Buren">Van Buren</a>, Fifth and Seventh streets, Sahid said.</p> <p class="content__segment" style="font:18px/27px acta, georgia, "times new roman", serif;color:rgb(34, 34, 34);text-transform:none;text-indent:0px;letter-spacing:normal;word-spacing:0px;white-space:normal;box-sizing:border-box;widows:1;font-size-adjust:none;font-stretch:normal;">UA is in the process of building its $136 million Biomedical Sciences Partnership building, which will house industry partners to conduct bioscience research. That 10-story, 245,000-square-foot structure is expected to open in January 2017. It will be home for the UA College of Medicine-Phoenix Center for Applied Nanoscience and Biomedicine.<br style="box-sizing:border-box;"></p> <p class="content__segment" style="font:18px/27px acta, georgia, "times new roman", serif;color:rgb(34, 34, 34);text-transform:none;text-indent:0px;letter-spacing:normal;word-spacing:0px;white-space:normal;box-sizing:border-box;widows:1;font-size-adjust:none;font-stretch:normal;">Since the inception of the campus, the city of Phoenix has invested $82.5 million, which primarily consists of land acquisition, infrastructure upgrade, building rehabilitation and construction of the first building on that campus, which is the headquarters for the Translational Genomics Research Institute and the International Genomics Consortium.</p> <p class="content__segment" style="font:18px/27px acta, georgia, "times new roman", serif;color:rgb(34, 34, 34);text-transform:none;text-indent:0px;letter-spacing:normal;word-spacing:0px;white-space:normal;box-sizing:border-box;widows:1;font-size-adjust:none;font-stretch:normal;">But the total investment of all the partners on the campus is $526 million, which includes the UA buildings, the cancer center jointly developed by Dignity Health and UA, the UA medical school and a parking garage.</p> <div class="truncated-content fade in" style="font:18px/27px acta, georgia, "times new roman", serif;transition:opacity 0.15s ease-out;color:rgb(34, 34, 34);text-transform:none;text-indent:0px;letter-spacing:normal;word-spacing:0px;white-space:normal;box-sizing:border-box;widows:1;font-size-adjust:none;font-stretch:normal;opacity:1;"> <p class="content__segment" style="box-sizing:border-box;">A Tripp-Umbach study released in 2014 showed the<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span><a style="transition:color 100ms ease-out, border-color 100ms ease-out;color:rgb(37, 79, 156);text-decoration:none;border-bottom-width:1px;border-bottom-style:solid;box-sizing:border-box;" href="http://www.bizjournals.com/phoenix/blog/health-care-daily/2014/12/study-economic-impact-of-phoenix-biomedical-campus.html" target="_blank">economic impact of the Phoenix Biomedical Campus</a><span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span>was $1.3 billion, while UA's medical school had a $961.6 million impact.<br style="box-sizing:border-box;"></p> <p class="content__segment" style="box-sizing:border-box;">The city is negotiating to<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span><a style="transition:color 100ms ease-out, border-color 100ms ease-out;color:rgb(37, 79, 156);text-decoration:none;border-bottom-width:1px;border-bottom-style:solid;box-sizing:border-box;" href="http://www.bizjournals.com/phoenix/blog/health-care-daily/2016/02/this-biotech-billionaire-plans-bigger-expansions.html" target="_blank">sell the TGen headquarters to Soon-Shiong</a>, said Christine Mackay, community and economic development director for Phoenix.</p> <p class="content__segment" style="box-sizing:border-box;">While the campus has focused on bioscience and health care, it has a new tenant — UA's Eller College of Management — that, on first blush, has nothing to do with the industry.</p> <p class="content__segment" style="box-sizing:border-box;"> <a target="_blank" style="transition:color 100ms ease-out, border-color 100ms ease-out;color:rgb(37, 79, 156);text-decoration:none;border-bottom-width:1px;border-bottom-style:solid;box-sizing:border-box;" href="http://www.bizjournals.com/phoenix/search/results?q=Paulo%20Goes">Paulo Goes</a>, the new dean of the Eller College of Management, said moving to the downtown campus makes sense for Eller.</p> <p class="content__segment" style="box-sizing:border-box;">"Our strategic direction and our focus on health care, digital leadership, entrepreneurship and innovation well align with the business landscape of the Valley," Goes said. "Phoenix is thriving with world class organizations and we see a great opportunity to partner on strategic programs and executive education. And more than 33,000 Eller alumni call it home."</p> <p class="content__segment" style="box-sizing:border-box;">Phoenix Vice Mayor Kate Gallego said the growth of the campus has helped put the city on the national and international map in terms of bioscience.</p> <p class="content__segment" style="box-sizing:border-box;">“The Phoenix Biomedical Campus has grown into the foundation for Arizona’s growing biomedical industry and helped to put the region on the national map as a cutting-edge center for research and medical collaboration,” she said. “It’s exciting to have Phoenix at the center of some of our most promising treatments to emerge in years for chronic and deadly diseases.”</p> </div> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-end" aria-hidden="true"></span> </html></div>https://biomedicalphoenix.com/Lists/News/Attachments/15/Phoenix-Business-Journal.jpg2016-07-19T07:00:00ZCity of Phoenix

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