UA College of Medicine – Phoenix Granted Full AccreditationUA College of Medicine – Phoenix Granted Full Accreditation<div class="ExternalClass74A420FA9DA54457A83F00B41EFDF6BE"><html> <p>http://phoenixmed.arizona.edu/about/news/ua-college-medicine-phoenix-granted-full-accreditation</p> <p>Wednesday, June 14, 2017</p> <p>The University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix has been granted full accreditation by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education, or LCME. The LCME is the national accrediting authority for medical education programs leading to MD degrees in the United States and Canada.</p> <p>"Earning full accreditation is an important milestone in the evolutionary history of the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix," said UA President Robert C. Robbins, MD, who is also a cardiothoracic surgeon. "Full accreditation assures students that they are getting an outstanding education, and it demonstrates to Arizona residents that the University of Arizona is graduating exceptional physicians."</p> <p>Kenneth S. Ramos, MD, PhD, interim dean of the UA College of Medicine – Phoenix, received a call last Friday from the LCME, notifying him that the college would move from provisional accreditation status to full accreditation. The LCME website (link is external) reflected this milestone on Monday.</p> <p>The LCME completed its latest site visit earlier this spring. The five-member team met with 120 faculty, students and staff during its four-day review of the college's medical education, research, clinical and community programs.</p> <p>"This significant milestone has been reached because of the collaborative spirit of our faculty and staff and the outstanding leadership of Dean Ramos," said Leigh A. Neumayer, MD, MS, FACS, interim senior vice president for the UA Health Sciences. "This announcement acknowledges the strength and excellence of this college and our ability to transform today's students into tomorrow's health care leaders."</p> <p>"The journey to full accreditation has been a labor of love for faculty, staff and students at the UA College of Medicine – Phoenix," Ramos said. "I am so proud of the hard work and commitment from the subcommittees and task force who worked countless hours to prepare for site visits and complete the extensive documentation required to gain full accreditation."</p> <p>The LCME will provide a comprehensive report within the next month detailing the site visit and the factors for granting full accreditation.</p> <p>"The UA College of Medicine – Phoenix is a special place that offers an innovative learning environment for tomorrow's physicians," Ramos said. "It is gratifying to see the LCME acknowledge our commitment to improving the health of all Arizona."</p> <p>All new medical schools undergo a rigorous process designed to standardize and optimize the quality of medical education across the U.S. and Canada. The first step in this process is "preliminary" accreditation, which the college received in 2012 and marked the point when students first were accepted as part of the separate accreditation. In 2015, the next step of "provisional" accreditation was granted, and now this final step of full accreditation. Each step involved subcommittees of faculty, staff and students reviewing all aspects of the college and the submission of hundreds of pages of documentation reviewing policies, data and details about the college. Given the challenges of the process, the college had projected to gain full accreditation in 2018.</p> <p>The LCME review focuses on what is in the best interest of the students. During the accreditation process, more than 100 performance elements are evaluated to establish whether a medical school is in good standing.</p> <p>Ten years ago, the UA College of Medicine – Phoenix was created to help meet the critical physician shortage in Arizona. Prior to beginning the separate accreditation process, it was a branch campus under the accreditation of the UA College of Medicine – Tucson and to date has graduated 354 physicians. Now the UA becomes one of only a few universities with two separate, fully accredited medical schools.</p> <p>Media Contacts:</p> <p>Chris Sigurdson (link sends e-mail), University Communications<br>Phone: 765-404-5959</p> <p>Marian Frank (link sends e-mail), UA College of Medicine – Phoenix<br>Phone: 602-827-2022</p> </html></div>https://biomedicalphoenix.com/Lists/News/Attachments/25/uofa.png2017-06-14T07:00:00ZUA
Applications open for 11th year of Helios Scholars at TGen biomedical research internshipsApplications open for 11th year of Helios Scholars at TGen biomedical research internships<div class="ExternalClass43F46D69990D4F07921472BF5551522A"><html> <p> <strong>​Summer program pairs Arizona students with TGen researchers in efforts to benefit patients</strong> </p> <p>PHOENIX, Ariz. — Jan. 4, 2017 — Following a successful 10th anniversary celebratory year, the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) today began accepting applications for the start of a second decade of Helios Scholars at TGen.</p> <p>Each summer, 45 students are selected for TGen’s flagship biomedical research internship program, supported by Helios Education Foundation.</p> <p>
Now entering its 11th year, Helios Scholars at TGen is an 8-week paid internship for Arizona students looking to further their interest in bioscience and medicine. Helios Scholars work in TGen's laboratories, receiving one-on-one mentorship from TGen scientists. These research projects aim for new discoveries about illnesses such as neurological disorders, infectious diseases and many types of cancer.</p> <p>

“We are excited about the start of a second decade of this significant collaboration with TGen,” said Paul J. Luna, President and CEO, Helios Education Foundation. “Helios Scholars at TGen is one of the most coveted bioscience internships in Arizona, providing intensive, hands-on learning to a diverse student population.”

</p> <p>Since the program began in 2007, 420 students have completed Helios Scholars at TGen. These scholars boast an array of impressive accomplishments, including acceptance into top tier graduate and medical schools, unique career developments, national awards and scholarships, and authorship credit in numerous scientific publications.<br>
<br>“Every class of Helios Scholars at TGen has big shoes to fill from the previous year's interns. We are looking for students who will rise to that challenge and take on a summer of scientific research to improve the lives of patients,” said Julie Euber, TGen’s Manager of Education and Outreach.</p> <p>In addition to patient-focused research, Helios Scholars participate in professional development seminars, including science communication, public speaking, and basic business etiquette, as well as social activities to build and strengthen relationships between students.
</p> <p>The internships are open to Arizona high school, undergraduate and graduate level students, including those in medical school.</p> <p>

Applications will be accepted through Feb. 10 at www.tgen.org/intern. For more information, contact Euber at 602-343-8459, or jeuber@tgen.org.</p> <p># # #</p> <p>About Helios Education Foundation
<br>Helios Education Foundation is dedicated to creating opportunities for individuals in Arizona and Florida to achieve a postsecondary education. Our work is driven by our four fundamental beliefs in Community, Investment, Equity and Partnership, and we invest in initiatives across the full education continuum.  <br>In Arizona, where Latino students comprise the largest percentage of the K-12 public school population, the Foundation is implementing its Arizona Latino Student Success initiative focused on preparing all students — especially students in high poverty, underserved Latino communities — for success. Through our Florida Regional Student Success Initiative, Helios is helping underserved, minority, first-generation students from the state’s large population centers in Miami, Orlando and Tampa achieve a postsecondary education.<br>Since 2006, the Foundation has invested over $185 million in education programs and initiatives in both states. To learn more about our efforts, visit us online at www.helios.org. </p> <p>Media Contact:<br>
Rebecca Lindgren<br>
Marketing Communications Director<br>
Helios Education Foundation<br>
602-381-2294<br>
rlindgren@helios.org</p> <p>About TGen<br>Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. TGen is focused on helping patients with neurological disorders, cancer, and diabetes, through cutting edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research towards patient benefit).  TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and rare complex diseases in adults and children. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities literally worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. TGen is allied with City of Hope, a world-renowned independent research and cancer and diabetes treatment center. This precision medicine alliance enables both institutes to complement each other in research and patient care, with City of Hope providing a significant clinical setting to advance scientific discoveries made by TGen. For more information, visit: www.tgen.org. Follow TGen on Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter @TGen.</p> <p>Media Contact:<br>Steve Yozwiak<br>TGen Senior Science Writer<br>602-343-8704<br>syozwiak@tgen.org</p> </html></div>2017-01-04T07:00:00ZTGen
Fox 10 - Medical mannequins allows med students to practice their skillsFox 10 - Medical mannequins allows med students to practice their skills<div class="ExternalClassF101442BA335489AB9E8390EA12527AC"><html> <p>​</p> <span aria-hidden="true" id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span> <p>http://www.fox10phoenix.com/news/arizona-news/217064356-story</p> <p>PHOENIX, Ariz. - There was a time when learning the practice of medicine required a student to work with live patients. Nowadays, a medical mannequin will allow students to practice the skills they learn.</p> <p>A medical mannequin has many of the same qualities as real people, but are not real.</p> <p>One of the mannequin, named "Patricia" is found at the Center for Simulation and Innovation at the University of Arizona College of Medicine in Phoenix.</p> <p>On the day we met Patricia, she "had" a heart attack.</p> <p>Students and faculty on the other side of a window looking out at Patricia provide her with a voice, and control her behaviors via computer, even how often she blinks her eyes.</p> <p>"Are you feeling sweaty now?" asked one person.</p> <p>"Yeah, I am" Patricia responded.</p> <p>The medical mannequin was made in Norway, which accounts for Patricia's fair complexion. Other mannequins come in different skin tones, to represent the full range of patients. Inside all of them is sophisticated technology. They almost look bionic.</p> <p>"She can blink, sweat, when we check pupils, they dilate and constrict. She can throw up on us, tongue swollen prevent us from airway drop her lungs. Collapsed lung, she can develop fluid around her heart and all signs and symptoms students will need to learn how to treat and manage," said Dr. Teresa Wu with the University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix.</p> <p>Wu said high-tech mannequins are a lot better than the way she learned her skills, during her time in medical school.</p> <p>"Prior to the advent of simulation technology, when I was training, we had to practice on live patients," said Wu. "So, the first time I did a central venous accessm I put a large needle into someone's neck, and that was on a live patient. Talk about pressure! So we wanted to find a better way"</p> <p>With Patricia, medical students can use her to master a couple of things: the base of medicine, and the muscle memory skill to do the procedures they need to do in real life.</p> <p>"The first time I tried to intubate Patricia, I couldn't get the tube in," said Katie Hawk. "Took three or four tries, but with help of faculty, the next three tries I got it each time."</p> <p>"Patricia and these models help us cultivate excellent muscle memory, so we can practice in no-risk environment, and we can keep trying until we get it, and we build perfect muscle memory for all the skills we will need in a clinical setting," said Nathan Goff</p> <p>The mannequins are useful, but they don't come cheap. Each cost between $20,000 to $180,000. Patricia is one of nine medical mannequins at the facility. There are also seven synthetic cadavers.<br></p> <span aria-hidden="true" id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span> </html></div>2016-11-11T07:00:00ZUA
Mini-Med School (October 12) with Dr. Martha Gulati: Women's Heart HealthMini-Med School (October 12) with Dr. Martha Gulati: Women's Heart Health<div class="ExternalClass5F30578086E24679BA0185290F617E4F"><html> <p>​</p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-start" aria-hidden="true"></span> <p>The University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix proudly organizes Mini-Medical School 3.0, a fascinating community lecture series open to the public.</p> <p>Heart disease is the #1 killer of women – just like men. Yet, bikini lines often define women’s health focusing on breasts and the reproductive system. Research specifically focused on women and cardiac care is several decades behind. At Mini-Medical School, Dr. Martha Gulati will lead a fascinating discussion sharing the vast differences between men and women and heart health. Dr. Gulati will answer the troubling questions, “Why were we so late to understand heart disease in women? And why women do worse than men in terms of heart disease?”</p> <p>Martha Gulati, MD, MS, FACC, FAHA<br>Division Chief of Cardiology for the UA College of Medicine – Phoenix<br>Physician Executive Director for the Banner – University Medicine Cardiovascular Institute</p> <p>Dr. Martha Gulati travels internationally as the leading expert on heart disease and women’s health. Her research has been featured in hundreds of newspapers across the world, including The New York Times and USA Today.</p> <p>She has also been featured on Oprah, CBS National News, The Today Show and many others. Dr. Gulati is the author of the best-seller, “Saving Women’s Hearts” and is the Editor-in-Chief of the American College of Cardiology “CardioSmart”, the patient education and empowerment initiative.</p> <p>Interactive Session: The second half of the event medical students will offer anatomy lessons with real pig hearts. Attendees will have the opportunity to learn about the functions of the heart up close.</p> <p>Mini-Medical School 3.0 is a community lecture series that is free and open to the public.  Guests will receive a small gift and light appetizers will be provided.</p> <p>REGISTER EARLY</p> <p> </p> <p>Wednesday, October 12<br>5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.<br>Virginia G. Piper Auditorium<br>600 E. Van Buren Street, Phoenix, AZ 85004</p> <p>Questions? Contact April Fischer at 602-827-2585 or aprilfischer@email.arizona.edu.<br></p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-end" aria-hidden="true"></span> </html></div>https://biomedicalphoenix.com/Lists/News/Attachments/19/uofa.png2016-09-14T07:00:00ZUA
TGen-NAU study generates Soviet anthrax pathogen genome from autopsy specimensTGen-NAU study generates Soviet anthrax pathogen genome from autopsy specimens<div class="ExternalClass2E0B4F39636843D8A29A780CEB0CA1B6"><html> <p> <strong>Next generation genomic analysis used to probe the former USSR’s biological weapons program</strong> </p> <p> <br>FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. — Sept. 7, 2016 — A new study by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) and Northern Arizona University (NAU) used deep DNA sequencing methods to generate the anthrax genome sequence from the victims of the 1979 anthrax outbreak in Sverdlovsk, Russia, when it was part of the USSR. </p> <p>The Soviet Union produced anthrax spores on an industrial scale but repeatedly denied the existence of their biological weapons program. This study, to be published in the September issue of the journal mBio, represents a precise and detailed examination of the anthrax strain used in their weapons development, and includes an anthrax genetic database that puts the weapons strain into a global context. </p> <p>“I have been studying this anthrax outbreak and these specimens for more than 20 years. Finally, using genomic technology, we could comprehensively characterize this pathogen genome,” said Dr. Paul Keim, a Regents Professor of Biology and the Cowden Endowed Chair of Microbiology at NAU, Director of TGen’s Pathogen Genomics Division, and the study’s lead author.</p> <p>“This is the signature agent of the world’s largest biological weapons program and now we have it in our genetic databases. Anywhere this strain shows up again, we will be able to identify it and track it back to its source. This is now an essential part of our forensic arsenal,” said Dr. Keim, who also is Director of NAU's Microbial Genetics & Genomics Center (MGGen).</p> <p>The anthrax bacterium produces small capsules, or spores, that can lie dormant for decades. After settling inside the human lung, for example, it can cause a severe disease that, if not treated with antibiotics, kills 90 percent of those it infects.</p> <p>Anthrax is found in many parts of the globe and dispersed through the human movement of animal parts contaminated with spores. Wool and hair from goats and sheep are moved globally as textiles or their precursors. When these originate in anthrax endemic regions, they can carry the spores, which are long-lived. While this bacterium has little variation from strain to strain, whole genome sequencing has identified DNA fingerprints that enable molecular epidemiology, tracing it to its source. When anthrax outbreaks occur, their whole genome profile are now routinely compared to the genetic database to identify possible sources and exclude others. This type of analysis was used by the FBI to track the spores in the 2001 anthrax letter attacks, which infected 22 people and killed five.</p> <p>The Soviet Union had signed the Biological Weapons convention that prohibited the use of biological agents, including anthrax, as weapons. The United States’ biological weapons program was eliminated in a decree by President Richard Nixon in 1969, but the Soviet program was maintained and expanded in a covert fashion for decades.</p> <p>In 1992, an investigative team from the United States led by noted Harvard biologist Dr. Matt Meselson characterized the 1979 Sverdlovsk outbreak by interviewing local physicians, visiting cemeteries and examining autopsy specimens. This investigation, along with accounts by Ken Alibek, a former Soviet scientist, revealed that the Sverdlovsk anthrax outbreak was due to an industrial accident.  A faulty filter at a Soviet spore production facility allowed anthrax spores, in a silent plume, to drift with the wind over the city and into the nearby countryside. Nearly 70 Sverdlovsk inhabitants died as far as three miles downwind from the facility, but more anthrax-susceptible farm animals died over 25 miles away. It remains the world’s deadliest human outbreak of inhalation anthrax.</p> <p>The bacterial genomes were generated from autopsy tissue specimens of two Sverdlovsk anthrax victims. These tissues were moved to the United States with permission of Sverdlovsk pathologists to continue the investigation into the disease outbreak. From these, it was established that the anthrax pathogen was detected within their tissues and the victims died from inhaling the spores.</p> <p>The Sverdlovsk anthrax genome was compared to the global genome database maintained by NAU to identify its close relatives and to look for evidence of genetic engineering. The Flagstaff research team found that this strain was closely related to other Asian isolates with very few differences to naturally occurring anthrax. There were no signs of genetic engineering. </p> <p>Dr. Keim notes that the Soviets had to be very meticulous to avoid mutant variants from dominating their production stock. Invariably when wild anthrax strains are grown extensively in the laboratory, they adapt to those conditions and lose the killing power.</p> <p>“The Sverdlovsk strain’s genome looked very much like those of wild strains we see across Asia,” Dr. Keim said.</p> <p>Dr. Meselson, who was not part of the current paper, notes: “If this strain had been grown repeated in the laboratory, it would have mutated to a form that had less virulence and less capacity to cause anthrax. The Soviet scientists must been very meticulous in their maintenance of the natural form.”</p> <p>Dr. Meselson, who is the Thomas Dudley Cabot Professor of the Natural Sciences at Harvard, is known for his 1961 discovery of messenger RNA. </p> <p>This study was supported by a grant from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.</p> <p># # #</p> <p>About NAU<br>Northern Arizona University is a high-research university with a statewide enrollment of 30,000 students. More than 20,000 students attend the Flagstaff campus, with more than 8,000 students enrolled online and at Extended Campus sites statewide. Research in genetics, forestry and ecology has drawn international recognition to the university, which also is highly regarded for its education, business and engineering programs. NAU launched competency-based Personalized Learning in 2013, the first self-paced, online education program that cuts the cost and time to an undergraduate degree. NAU is the host institution for the Center for Microbial Genetics and Genomics (MGGEN) where this study was performed. NAU has around 100 graduate students in the biological sciences. For more information, visit nau.edu. Follow NAU on Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram and Twitter.</p> <p>Media Contact:<br>Kimberly Ott    <br>Assistant to the President for Executive Communications and Media Relations <br>(928) 523-1894<br>Kimberly.Ott@nau.edu            </p> <p> <br>About TGen<br>Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. TGen is focused on helping patients with neurological disorders, cancer, and diabetes, through cutting edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research towards patient benefit).  TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and rare complex diseases in adults and children. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities literally worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: www.tgen.org. Follow TGen on Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter @TGen.</p> <p>Media Contact:<br>Steve Yozwiak<br>TGen Senior Science Writer<br>602-343-8704<br>syozwiak@tgen.org<br></p> </html></div>2016-09-07T07:00:00ZTGen
Study validates TGen developed test for healthcare-acquired infectionsStudy validates TGen developed test for healthcare-acquired infections<div class="ExternalClassCDA008753E9F4EBBBDB8460C8B570B82"><html> <strong>Molecular-based KlebSeq assay could save lives and lower healthcare costs</strong><p><br>FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. — Sept. 2, 2016 — A new study by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) details the design and validation of a low-cost, rapid and highly accurate screening tool — known as KlebSeq  — for potentially deadly healthcare-acquired infections (HAIs), such as Klebsiella pneumoniae. HAIs affect hundreds of thousands of patients annually and add nearly $10 billion in associated healthcare costs.</p> <p>The findings, to be published in the October issue of the Journal of Clinical Microbiology, detail the workings of the KlebSeq test at detecting HAIs earlier, in particular Klebsiella, which has multiple strains, such as ST258, which are increasingly resistant to treatment by antibiotics. </p> <p>Unlike traditional assays that require growing a live culture in a laboratory setting, which adds days to the testing process and layers on cost, KlebSeq employs a technique called amplicon sequencing that identifies the presence of Klebsiella and stratifies its characteristics, such as strain type and whether it may be antibiotic resistant.</p> <p>“KlebSeq is able to accurately and consistently identify and characterize Klebsiella from many different types of specimen samples, including blood, urine, nasal swabs, and respiratory fluids,” said Dr. Jolene Bowers, a Post-Doctoral fellow in TGen’s Pathogen Genomics Division, TGen North, and the paper’s first author.</p> <p>In 2015, Bowers co-led a study published in PLOS One, in collaboration with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which documented the rapid global spread of ST258.</p> <p>According to the CDC, nearly 2 million Americans annually contract bacterial infections that are resistant to at least one antibiotic, and 23,000 die each year from such infections, nearly twice as many who die of AIDS.</p> <p>“Improved testing technology holds great potential for the rapid detection of HAIs and more quickly identifying antibiotic-resistant infections, such as K. pneumoniae, which have become an urgent public health crisis,” said Bowers. “KlebSeq is a perfect example of the power of genomic-based analytical tools that deliver results faster, more accurately and at a lower cost.”</p> <p>According to Dr. David Engelthaler, Director of Programs and Operations for TGen North, and one of the authors of the study, transmission of multidrug-resistant strains of K. pneumoniae is rapid and without initial symptoms, leading to outbreaks in the healthcare system and the community that often go undetected.</p> <p>“Early detection of K. pneumoniae in healthcare patients, especially those with multidrug-resistant strains, is critical to infection control,” said Dr. Engelthaler, who also is a former epidemiologist for the state of Arizona. “Perhaps most concerning is that Kleb acts like a shuttle for critical resistance genes, often transmitting them to other HAI species. It is important for us to detect both the bacteria and these critical genes.”</p> <p>KlebSeq can be used for routine screening and surveillance, enabling healthcare staff to make more informed patient decisions, and curb outbreak situations by rapidly identifying transmissions prior patients showing signs of infection. Classifying the type of infection in each patient would help enable an institution to decide when and which intervention procedures to enact.</p> <p>Study results suggest that KlebSeq would be especially helpful for high-risk patients — those in intensive-care units, centers specializing in bone marrow transplantation or chronically immunosuppressed patients, long-term care facilities, and travelers returning from endemic regions.</p> <p>“The sensitivity of KlebSeq is superior to culture-based methods,” said Dr. Paul Keim, Director of TGen North and the senior author of the study.</p> <p>“KlebSeq is an important step toward a comprehensive, yet accessible, tool for all pathogen identification and characterization,” said Dr. Keim, who also is the Cowden Endowed Chair of Microbiology at Northern Arizona University, and Director of NAU's Center for Microbial Genetics and Genomics (MGGen).</p> <p>The results also suggest that KlebSeq could be easily modified to detect other healthcare-acquired infectious agents, and identify those with antimicrobial resistance. It could also be used for outbreak detection, transmission mapping and tracing the source of infections by being able to screen hundreds of patient samples simultaneously, at a cost of tens of dollars per patient.</p> <p>KlebSeq: A Diagnostic Tool for Surveillance, Detection, and Monitoring of Klebsiella pneumoniae, will be published in the October 2016 issue of the Journal of Clinical Microbiology.</p> <p># # #</p> <p>About TGen<br>Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. TGen is focused on helping patients with neurological disorders, cancer, and diabetes, through cutting edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research towards patient benefit).  TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and rare complex diseases in adults and children. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities literally worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: www.tgen.org. Follow TGen on Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter @TGen.</p> <p>Media Contact:<br>Steve Yozwiak<br>TGen Senior Science Writer<br>602-343-8704<br>syozwiak@tgen.org<br></p> <span aria-hidden="true" id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span> </html></div>2016-09-02T07:00:00ZTGen
Nov. 6 stepNout 5K aims for another $1 million for TGen cancer researchNov. 6 stepNout 5K aims for another $1 million for TGen cancer research<div class="ExternalClass93BF38BA36F14922BCB4E692C2F366B6"><html> <p> <strong>11th annual stepNout Run/Walk/Dash seeks end to pancreatic cancer, soon the nation’s 3rd leading cause of cancer death</strong></p> <p> <br>SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. — Aug. 25, 2016 — This year, pancreatic cancer is projected to eclipse breast cancer as the third leading cause of cancer-related death in the U.S. </p> <p>The Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is determined to reverse this trend in pancreatic cancer by enlisting the help of more than 1,000 participants at the 11th annual stepNout Run/Walk/Dash for pancreatic cancer research, Nov. 6 in Scottsdale.</p> <p>“We are incredibly grateful to the hundreds of volunteers who have truly accelerated the development of new treatments for pancreatic cancer,” said Michael Bassoff, President of the TGen Foundation. “These generous runners and community leaders have brought hope and answers to pancreatic cancer patients around the world.”</p> <p>Be sure to put on your running shoes for stepNout, a family-friendly morning of races, music, games, and activities — including a photo booth and face painting — all celebrating TGen’s efforts to stomp out pancreatic cancer.</p> <p>Dr. Daniel Von Hoff, TGen Distinguished Professor and Physician-In-Chief, said more effective treatments for pancreatic cancer are needed. Pancreatic cancer this year will take the lives of nearly 42,000 Americans, a more than 10 percent increase in the past 5 years.</p> <p>“The death rate for other leading cancers have been flat in recent years because of more effective treatments,” said Dr. Von Hoff. “We are making progress in treating patients with improvement in average survival and for the first time having some very long term survivors. We need continued, dedicated funding to improve on these promising results to our studies and benefit pancreatic patients who need our help now.”</p> <p>Median survival for patients with advanced disease was less than 6 months, and the 5-year survival rate was less than 10 percent. But thanks to fundraising efforts like stepNout, these statistics are improving.</p> <p>Under Dr. Von Hoff's leadership, and in collaboration with HonorHealth, TGen pioneered a major international clinical trial that led the FDA in 2013 approved the use of Abraxane in combination with gemcitabine, which now is the nation’s standard of care for this disease. Two ongoing TGen-led studies are showing even greater promise, with tumor reductions of at least 30 percent in 3 in 4 patients, and the elimination of tumors in 1 in 5 patients.</p> <p>Competitive and fun races at stepNout are geared for all ages and abilities, including the event’s signature 5K run. Online registration ends Nov. 1, though participants can register at the event. This is the third year stepNout will be at the Scottsdale Sports Complex, northeast of Bell and Hayden roads.</p> <p>The annual event has raised more than $1 million since it started in 2006. Nearly $135,000 was raised last year, and organizers are aiming for $150,000 this year on their way towards an overall goal of $2 million.</p> <p>And you don’t have to be at stepNout to help. You can donate at www.tgenfoundation.org/step.</p> <p>*</p> <p>If you go to stepNout:</p> <p>
What: TGen's 11th annual stepNout Run/Walk/Dash for pancreatic cancer research.
<br>Where: Scottsdale Sports Complex, 8081 E. Princess Drive, northeast of Hayden and Bell roads, between Loop 101 and Frank Lloyd Wright Boulevard.
<br>When: 7:30-11 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 6.  Registration starts at 7:30 a.m.; a competitive 5K run begins at 9 a.m.; a fun 1-mile run/walk starts at 9:15 a.m.; a free 50-yard kids' dash is planned for 10:30 a.m.
<br>Cost: Registration fees range from $10 to $30, depending on age. Costs increase by $5 after Oct. 21. Children ages 5 and under are free.<br>Parking: Free.
<br>More information and registration: www.tgenfoundation.org/step and click on events. Contact Andrea Daly at (602) 343-8572 or by email at adaly@tgen.org.</p> <p># # #</p> <p>About TGen<br>Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. TGen is focused on helping patients with neurological disorders, cancer, and diabetes, through cutting edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research towards patient benefit).  TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and rare complex diseases in adults and children. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities literally worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: www.tgen.org. Follow TGen on Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter @TGen.</p> <p>Media Contact:<br>Steve Yozwiak<br>TGen Senior Science Writer<br>602-343-8704<br>syozwiak@tgen.org<br></p> <span aria-hidden="true" id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span> </html></div>2016-08-25T07:00:00ZTGen
Med School Welcomes Pharmacy Cohort to Phoenix CampusMed School Welcomes Pharmacy Cohort to Phoenix Campus<div class="ExternalClassCB7F60E6FD7248059298705D5CA2585E"><html> <p>The University of Arizona welcomed its first class of beginning pharmacy students to the Phoenix Biomedical Campus (link is external) last week.  Twenty-three aspiring pharmacists have been selected to complete four years of professional study from the downtown campus.</p> <p>The first-year Phoenix students are part of a class that totals 111. They join 88 first-year doctor of pharmacy students who will simultaneously complete the same programs from the Tucson campus of the University of Arizona College of Pharmacy. The semester began Monday, Aug. 22. </p> <p>Thanks to distance-learning technology, Phoenix students in the Class of 2020 attend the same lectures as their Tucson counterparts. Classrooms in both locations are equipped for "synchronous learning," meaning lectures are broadcast in real time, with two-way communication at both locations. On-campus faculty at each location lead case discussions and clinical teaching. </p> <p>A pharmacy-practice laboratory where students can learn about compounding also has been established in the Health Sciences Education Building on the Phoenix campus. It is similar to a lab that has been in place on the Tucson campus for about a decade.</p> <p>A staff of six College of Pharmacy employees, including three faculty members, will guide students through this first year of the full pharmacy program on the Phoenix campus.</p> <p>Not quite 75 percent of the Phoenix–based pharmacy students listed addresses in the Phoenix metropolitan area when they applied to the College of Pharmacy several months ago. Staying in the city they knew for their professional education was important to many.</p> <p><strong>Michelle Ciambella</strong>, who went to Arizona State University as an undergraduate and says her life is centered in Phoenix, is delighted to be enrolled in a premier school within walking distance of her residence.  Fellow ASU graduate <strong>Nina Dimitrova </strong>describes being in Phoenix as “big for me.”  Staying in the metropolis was an important factor in planning her professional education, she says. Classmate <strong>Nate Evans</strong> has lived in Phoenix his entire life, and would have chosen the other pharmacy school in Arizona for his PharmD education had UA COP not initiated a Phoenix component of its program. </p> <p>Other students wanted to go back to the state capital after time away. <strong>Saba Maghari </strong>lived in Tucson while completing a bachelor’s degree in chemistry at the University of Arizona, and knew she wanted to apply to the highly ranked UA doctor of pharmacy program when she decided to become a pharmacist. The opening of COP’s Phoenix-based component this year offered her an added bonus: studying in the same town where an aunt and two uncles already practice pharmacy and where there are multiple job opportunities for her both as a student and after she graduates.</p> <p>“Having a Phoenix cohort as part of our nationally recognized four-year pharmacy program is one of the ways we expand the options for our students,” <strong>Rick G. Schnellmann</strong>, dean of the college, says. “We are very pleased to have a full curriculum available in the population center of our state. The aim is to support a cohesive group of students who will have very similar learning and extracurricular experiences whether they are in Maricopa County or Pima County.”</p> <p><em>For more information about studying pharmacy on the Phoenix Biomedical Campus, </em><a target="_blank" href="http://www.pharmacy.arizona.edu/pharmd/phxpharmd"><em>visit this page</em></a><em>.</em></p> </html></div>https://biomedicalphoenix.com/Lists/News/Attachments/18/uafirstcohort.jpg2016-08-23T07:00:00ZUA
U.S. issues patent for Valley Fever detection technology developed by TGen and NAUU.S. issues patent for Valley Fever detection technology developed by TGen and NAU<div class="ExternalClass5E5380FBB1494DFE8453AE56B6D779D9"><html> <p>​</p> <h4 class="o_gEPV1NTWQkXX0HDg_0 as_gEPV1NTWQkXX0HDg_0 inheritFontFamily"> <em> <span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;"> <strong> <font size="5" color="#000000"> <span aria-hidden="true" id="ms-rterangecursor-start"></span> <span aria-hidden="true" id="ms-rterangecursor-end"></span>Test for dust-borne fungal infection created by TGen and NAU is licensed to DxNA </font> </strong> </span> </em> </h4> <h4 class="o_gEPV1NTWQkXX0HDg_0 as_gEPV1NTWQkXX0HDg_0 inheritFontFamily"> <font size="3" face="Times New Roman"> </font> <p> <strong> <span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;font-size:10pt;">PHOENIX, Ariz. — Aug. 2, 2016 —</span> </strong> <span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;font-size:10pt;"> Valley Fever, a potentially deadly dust-borne fungal disease, should be easier to diagnose and treat thanks to a testing technology developed by the <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=gsFIgbmnoMs%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=http://www.tgen.org/" title="Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen)"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen)</font></span></a> and Northern Arizona University (NAU), and now protected by a patent issued today by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.<br> <br> TGen and NAU have exclusively licensed this technology to DxNA LLC, a company based in St. George, Utah, which plans to make this Valley Fever Test commercially available to hospitals and clinics upon completion of FDA clinical trials and a subsequent FDA 510(k) submission for review and clearance later this year.<br> <br> Valley Fever is endemic to Phoenix and Tucson, but also is <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=gsFIgbmnoMs%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=http://www.tgen.org/home/news/2016-media-releases/tgen-tracks-spread-of-valley-fever.aspx%23.V5-uWY7a5DM" title="spreading throughout the arid regions of North and South America"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">spreading throughout the arid regions of North and South America</font></span></a>. It is an infection caused by the microscopic fungus Coccidioides, a pathogen that lives in desert soils and typically enters the body through the lungs. An estimated 150,000 Americans are infected annually by Valley Fever, and as many as 500 die each year.<br> <br> “Currently, there is no definitive test for Valley Fever. Our new rapid, 1-hour, genetic-based test will provide physicians and patients with a precise diagnosis, enabling prompt treatment and preventing this disease from becoming more serious,” said Dr. Paul Keim, Director of TGen's Pathogen Genomics Division, or TGen North, based in Flagstaff.<br> <br> “For the past decade, TGen has worked to develop better tools and technology to address Valley Fever, and we think it is critical to be able to apply our cutting-edge science to problems in our own backyard,” said Dr. Keim, who also is the Cowden Endowed Chair of Microbiology at NAU, and Director of NAU's Center for Microbial Genetics and Genomics (MGGen).<br> <br> Valley Fever most commonly causes a progressive lung infection, but can also spread to other parts of the body, including the skin, bone, brain and the rest of the nervous system.<br> <br> Nearly 60 percent of those infected by Valley Fever — including other vertebrates, and especially dogs — develop no significant symptoms. However, some patients develop highly debilitating symptoms, such as cough, fever and fatigue. These symptoms are similar to other respiratory diseases caused by bacteria or virus, and often lead to delayed diagnoses and inappropriate treatment. Very severe Valley Fever can require lifelong treatment with antifungal drugs, and even result in death.<br> <br> This new genetic-based test can precisely identify both strains of Valley Fever: Coccidioides posadasii, found in Arizona, New Mexico, Texas and much of Latin America, and Coccidioides immitus, which is found in California, Washington and Baja Mexico.<br> <br> Most infections occur in central and southern Arizona. Each year on average, there are an estimated 150,000 cases in Arizona, resulting in more than 1,700 hospitalizations at a cost of more than $86 million.<br> <br> “These high costs are driven to a significant degree by the high level of misdiagnosis, resulting in an average time to diagnosis of 5 months from when a patient first seeks care,” said David Taus, CEO of DxNA LLC. “Our test provides definitive results in 60 minutes, dramatically improving the diagnosis of the disease over current methodologies, both in terms of time and accuracy.”<br> <br> The intellectual property used in DxNA’s Valley Fever Test is exclusive to DxNA LLC, and covers both human and <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=gsFIgbmnoMs%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=http://www.tgen.org/home/news/2016-media-releases/owners-register-dogs-to-help-treat-valley-fever.aspx%23.V5-yy47a5DM" title="veterinary applications"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">veterinary applications</font></span></a>, Taus said.<br> <br> # # #<br> <br> <strong><span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;">About TGen</span></strong><br> Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. TGen is focused on helping patients with neurological disorders, cancer, and diabetes, through cutting edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research towards patient benefit).  TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and rare complex diseases in adults and children. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities literally worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=gsFIgbmnoMs%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=http://www.tgen.org/home.aspx" title="Home"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">www.tgen.org</font></span></a>. Follow TGen on <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=gsFIgbmnoMs%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=https://www.facebook.com/helptgen" title="Facebook"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">Facebook</font></span></a>, <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=gsFIgbmnoMs%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=https://www.linkedin.com/company/tgen" title="LinkedIn"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">LinkedIn</font></span></a> and <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=gsFIgbmnoMs%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=https://twitter.com/TGen" title="Twitter @TGen"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">Twitter @TGen</font></span></a>.<br> <br> <strong><span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;">Media Contact:</span></strong><br> Steve Yozwiak<br> TGen Senior Science Writer<br> 602-343-8704<br> <a target="_blank" href="mailto:syozwiak@tgen.org" title="syozwiak@tgen.org"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">syozwiak@tgen.org<br></font><font color="#0092e6"> </font></span></a><br> <strong><span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;">About DxNA LLC</span></strong></span> <strong> <span style="font-family:"ms gothic";font-size:10pt;">
</span> </strong> <span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;font-size:10pt;"> <br> DxNA is a privately held company located in St. George Utah. It is a molecular diagnostics company that develops and distributes portable, fully-integrated systems and tests for infectious disease in the medical, agricultural, food safety, and biosecurity markets. The Company's systems and technologies enable rapid and precise molecular testing to take place on-site by allowing for otherwise complex laboratory procedures to be performed almost anywhere. DxNA's patented GeneSTAT® portable Real Time PCR molecular diagnostic testing system will allow individuals with minimal training to conduct accurate real-time diagnostic testing in virtually any location including laboratories, clinics, physician offices, emergency rooms or field settings. Designed with economy in mind, GeneSTAT is inherently less costly than the real time PCR systems typical of clinical laboratories.<br> <br> <strong><span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;">About Northern Arizona University</span></strong><br> Northern Arizona University is a high-research university with a statewide enrollment of 28,000 students. More than 20,000 students attend the Flagstaff campus, with 8,000 students enrolled online and at Extended Campus sites statewide. Research in genetics, forestry and ecology has drawn international recognition to the university, which also is highly regarded for its education, business and engineering programs. NAU launched competency-based Personalized Learning in 2013, the first self-paced, online education program that cuts the cost and time to an undergraduate degree.</span> </p> <font size="3" face="Times New Roman"> </font> </h4> </html></div>2016-08-02T07:00:00ZTGen
10th class of bioscience interns complete Helios Scholars at TGen10th class of bioscience interns complete Helios Scholars at TGen<div class="ExternalClass323C0472E87549D1861AE40BBD6CDD76"><html> <p>​</p> <span aria-hidden="true" id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span> <h4 class="o_gEPV1NTWQkXX0HDg_0 as_gEPV1NTWQkXX0HDg_0 inheritFontFamily"> <font size="3" face="Times New Roman"> </font> </h4> <h2 style="margin:0.83em 0in;"> <span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;"> <strong> <font size="5" color="#000000">Hands-on biomedical research internships pair students with TGen researchers to help advance discoveries that can benefit patients</font> </strong> </span> </h2> <h4 class="o_gEPV1NTWQkXX0HDg_0 as_gEPV1NTWQkXX0HDg_0 inheritFontFamily"> <font size="3" face="Times New Roman"> </font> <p> <strong> <span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;font-size:10pt;">PHOENIX, Ariz. — July 29, 2016 —</span> </strong> <span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;font-size:10pt;"> Celebrating the program’s 10th year, the 2016 Helios Scholars at TGen completed their eight-week internships today with a daylong scientific symposium at the Hyatt Regency Phoenix.<br> <br> The collaboration between the Helios Education Foundation and the <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=h5e0N01kzUU%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=http://www.tgen.org/" title="Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen)"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen)</font></span></a> graduated 44 students who will help form the next generation of scientists specializing in Arizona’s growing biomedical fields.<br> <br> “This 10th anniversary year of Helios Scholars at TGen represents a milestone in this innovative program, which has helped launch the careers of many promising and talented researchers and physicians,” said Dr. Jeffrey Trent, TGen President and Research Director. “In partnership with Helios, these students have experienced what it is like to pursue patient-centric research on the frontier of genomic medicine.”<br> <br> Helios Scholars at TGen is the research institute’s flagship summer internship program for Arizona students looking to further their interest in bioscience and medicine. Helios Scholars work in TGen’s laboratories — receiving one-on-one mentorship from TGen scientists — on research projects that aim for new molecular-level discoveries about neurological disorders, infectious diseases and many types of cancer.<br> <br> More than 400 students have now graduated the program since its inception in 2007.<br> <br> "We are proud of the impact Helios Scholars at TGen has had on the lives of hundreds of talented students in Arizona,” said Paul J. Luna, President and CEO, Helios Education Foundation. “This program provides this diverse student population with a unique opportunity to immerse themselves in an intensive, hands-on, scientific learning experience, and it propels them toward achieving success in college and career.  We look forward to the next 10 years, and beyond, of this impactful program.”<br> <br> The full-time, paid internships are open to Arizona high school, undergraduate and graduate level students, including those in medical school. From more than 500 student applications, 33 undergraduates, 1 graduate student and 10 high school students were selected this summer.<br> <br> Students hail from many schools and backgrounds, including Arizona State University, the University of Arizona, Northern Arizona University, Phoenix College, and these Arizona high schools: BASIS Chandler, Bioscience, Desert Vista, Hamilton, Phoenix Country Day, South Ridge, Sunnyslope, Tempe Preparatory and Xavier College Preparatory. Five students currently attend out-of-state colleges. <br> <br> In addition to patient-focused research, Helios Scholars participate in professional development seminars, including science communication, public speaking, and basic business etiquette, as well as social activities to build and strengthen relationships between students. This summer’s program concluded today with a scientific symposium highlighting the accomplishments of the 2016 Helios Scholars at TGen. <br> <br> Scholars boast an array of impressive accomplishments including acceptance into top tier graduate and medical schools, unique career developments, national awards and scholarships, and authorship credit in numerous scientific publications.<br> <br> Applications for the 11th class of Helios Scholars at TGen will be accepted starting in January 2017 at <a href="http://www.tgen.org/intern" target="_blank"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">www.tgen.org/intern</font></span></a>. For more information, contact Julie Euber, TGen Education and Outreach Specialist, at 602-343-8459, or <a target="_blank" href="mailto:jeuber@tgen.org" title="jeuber@tgen.org"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">jeuber@tgen.org</font></span></a>.<br> <br> # # #<br> <br> <strong><span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;">About Helios Education Foundation</span></strong><br> Helios Education Foundation is focused on creating opportunities for individuals in Arizona and Florida to succeed in postsecondary education by advancing the academic preparedness of all students and fostering a high-expectation, college-going culture. Through a decade of strategic partnership and investment, Helios has identified Early Grade Success, College and Career Readiness and Postsecondary Completion as the three most critical reform priorities in achieving our long term goal. As an engaged foundation, embedded in communities across both states, the Foundation is contributing its expertise and financial resources to better prepare students for college and career in a globally-competitive economy. Since 2006, Helios has invested nearly $170 million in education-related programs and initiatives in Arizona and Florida. For more information about the Foundation, visit <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=h5e0N01kzUU%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=http://www.helios.org/" title="www.helios.org"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">www.helios.org</font></span></a>.<br> <br> <strong><span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;">Media Contact:</span></strong></span> <strong> <span style="font-family:"ms gothic";font-size:10pt;">
</span> </strong> <span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;font-size:10pt;"> <br> Rebecca Lindgren<br> </span> <span style="font-family:"ms gothic";font-size:10pt;">
</span> <span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;font-size:10pt;">Marketing Communications Director<br> </span> <span style="font-family:"ms gothic";font-size:10pt;">
</span> <span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;font-size:10pt;">Helios Education Foundation</span> <span style="font-family:"ms gothic";font-size:10pt;">
</span> <span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;font-size:10pt;"> <br> 602-381-2294<br> <a target="_blank" href="mailto:rlindgren@helios.org" title="rlindgren@helios.org"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">rlindgren@helios.org</font></span></a><br> <br> <strong><span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;">About TGen</span></strong><br> Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. TGen is focused on helping patients with neurological disorders, cancer, and diabetes, through cutting edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research towards patient benefit).  TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and rare complex diseases in adults and children. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities literally worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=h5e0N01kzUU%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=http://www.tgen.org/home.aspx" title="Home"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">www.tgen.org</font></span></a>. Follow TGen on <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=h5e0N01kzUU%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=https://www.facebook.com/helptgen" title="Facebook"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">Facebook</font></span></a>, <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=h5e0N01kzUU%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=https://www.linkedin.com/company/tgen" title="LinkedIn"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">LinkedIn</font></span></a> and <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=h5e0N01kzUU%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=https://twitter.com/TGen" title="Twitter @TGen"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">Twitter @TGen</font></span></a>.<br> <br> <strong><span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;">Media Contact:</span></strong><br> Steve Yozwiak<br> TGen Senior Science Writer<br> 602-343-8704<br> <a target="_blank" href="mailto:syozwiak@tgen.org" title="syozwiak@tgen.org"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">syozwiak@tgen.org</font></span></a></span> </p> <font size="3" face="Times New Roman"> <span aria-hidden="true" id="ms-rterangecursor-start"></span><span aria-hidden="true" id="ms-rterangecursor-end"></span></font> </h4> <span aria-hidden="true" id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span> </html></div>2016-07-29T07:00:00ZTGen
Cycle for the Cure raises a record $248,725 for cancer research at TGenCycle for the Cure raises a record $248,725 for cancer research at TGen<div class="ExternalClass3FD0700A027649DAAAA9A265230CCD0E"><html> <p>​</p> <span aria-hidden="true" id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span> <h4 class="o_gEPV1NTWQkXX0HDg_0 as_gEPV1NTWQkXX0HDg_0 inheritFontFamily"> <font size="3" face="Times New Roman"> </font> </h4> <h2 style="margin:0.83em 0in;"> <em> <span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;"> <strong> <font size="5" color="#000000">Philanthropists Sherry and Richard Holson are instrumental in securing $100,000 in donations from Guarantee Trust Life</font> </strong> </span> </em> </h2> <h4 class="o_gEPV1NTWQkXX0HDg_0 as_gEPV1NTWQkXX0HDg_0 inheritFontFamily"> <font size="3" face="Times New Roman"> </font> <p> <strong> <span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;font-size:10pt;">PHOENIX, Ariz. — July 27, 2016 —</span> </strong> <span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;font-size:10pt;"> This year’s <em><span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;">Cycle for the Cure</span></em> already was on track to be one of the most successful in its six years of raising cancer research funds for the non-profit <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=2SMnw6vB7Z8%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=http://www.tgen.org/" title="Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen)"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen)</font></span></a>.<br> <br> But thanks to additional donations generated by Guarantee Trust Life of Glenview, Ill., the 6th annual <em><span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;">Cycle for the Cure</span></em> garnered a record $248,725 for TGen.<br> <br> The May 1 event, which featured hundreds of dedicated donors spinning on stationary cycles for up to 2 hours at several health clubs in Phoenix and Scottsdale, produced $173,725. <br> <br> But Vicki Vaughn, Co-Chair of <em><span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;">Cycle for the Cure</span></em>, wasn’t finished.<br> <br> After introducing her friends — Richard S. Holson III, Chairman, CEO and President of Guarantee Trust Life, and his wife, Sherry — to TGen, the Holson’s company invited TGen cancer researcher Dr. Will Hendricks and TGen Foundation Vice President Erin Massey to present at Guarantee Trust Life’s recent company conference in Arizona. The company was impressed and donated $25,000, part of the initial tally for <em><span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;">Cycle for the Cure</span></em>.<br> <br> Then, after company officials toured TGen laboratories, they challenged their partners and representatives to donate to <em><span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;">Cycle for the Cure</span></em>. They raised a combined $37,500, which Guarantee Trust Life matched, dollar-for-dollar, adding another $75,000 to the $25,000 the company already donated, bringing the total generated by Guarantee Trust Life to $100,000.<br> <br> "TGen should be very grateful to my wife, Sherry, and Vicki Vaughn as they were responsible for introducing my company to this amazing organization. We were impressed with, and inspired by, the remarkable people at TGen and the world-class, life-changing research being conducted," said Richard Holson. "And the response by our agents with their contributions was great."<br> <br> Using genomic sequencing, TGen helps doctors match the appropriate therapy to each patient's DNA profile, producing the greatest patient benefit. This year, <em><span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;">Cycle for the Cure</span></em> raised research funds for work on a revolutionary diagnostic method called “liquid biopsies” — biomarkers in circulating blood — as a means of providing patients and their doctors with early detection of disease.<br> <br> “We believe everyone should know first-hand about the groundbreaking research going on at TGen, and we encourage everyone to join us in supporting the vital work TGen does,” said Vicki Vaughn, who co-chaired <em><span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;">Cycle for the Cure</span></em> with Robyn DeBell.<br> <br> Village Health Clubs and Studio 360 provided the venues for this year’s <em><span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;">Cycle for the Cure</span></em>. In addition, yoga and kinesis classes were included in the fundraising events by Village Health Clubs at its DC Ranch and Camelback locations. <br> <br> “We are incredibly proud to have merited the dedicated support of volunteer co-chairs Vicki Vaughn and Robyn DeBell,” said TGen Foundation President Michael Bassoff. “Their extraordinary leadership, and the generosity of business leaders like Rick Holman and the Guarantee Trust Life company, provides an incredible boost to TGen's cancer research initiatives.”<br> <br> Donations continue to be accepted at <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=2SMnw6vB7Z8%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=http://events.tgen.org/site/TR?fr_id%3d1200%26amp%3bpg%3dentry" title="www.tgenfoundation.org/cycle"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">www.tgenfoundation.org/cycle</font></span></a>. And save the date for next year’s 7th annual Cycle for the Cure: April 30, 2017.<br> <br> # # #<br> <br> <strong><span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;">About TGen</span></strong><br> Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. TGen is focused on helping patients with neurological disorders, cancer, and diabetes, through cutting edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research towards patient benefit).  TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and rare complex diseases in adults and children. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities literally worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=2SMnw6vB7Z8%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=http://www.tgen.org/home.aspx" title="Home"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">www.tgen.org</font></span></a>. Follow TGen on <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=2SMnw6vB7Z8%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=https://www.facebook.com/helptgen" title="Facebook"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">Facebook</font></span></a>, <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=2SMnw6vB7Z8%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=https://www.linkedin.com/company/tgen" title="LinkedIn"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">LinkedIn</font></span></a> and <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=2SMnw6vB7Z8%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=https://twitter.com/TGen" title="Twitter @TGen"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">Twitter @TGen</font></span></a>.<br> <br> <strong><span style="font-family:"arial",sans-serif;">Media Contact:</span></strong><br> Steve Yozwiak<br> TGen Senior Science Writer<br> 602-343-8704<br> <a target="_blank" href="mailto:syozwiak@tgen.org" title="syozwiak@tgen.org"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0092e6">syozwiak@tgen.org</font></span></a></span> </p> <font size="3" face="Times New Roman"> </font> <span style="color:black;font-family:"arial",sans-serif;font-size:10pt;"> <img border="0" src="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackpixel.aspx?nid=2SMnw6vB7Z8%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d" style="margin:5px;width:1px;" /> </span> </h4> <span aria-hidden="true" id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span> </html></div>2016-07-27T07:00:00ZTGen
Phoenix Business Journal - What's next for the 15-year-old Phoenix Biomedical CampusPhoenix Business Journal - What's next for the 15-year-old Phoenix Biomedical Campus<div class="ExternalClassEE5719C12E0143968CF7EC82623BC94E"><html> <p>​<a target="_blank" href="http://www.bizjournals.com/phoenix/blog/health-care-daily/2016/07/whats-next-for-the-15-year-old-phoenix-biomedical.html">http://www.bizjournals.com/phoenix/blog/health-care-daily/2016/07/whats-next-for-the-15-year-old-phoenix-biomedical.html</a></p> <p class="content__segment" style="font:18px/27px acta, georgia, "times new roman", serif;color:rgb(34, 34, 34);text-transform:none;text-indent:0px;letter-spacing:normal;word-spacing:0px;white-space:normal;box-sizing:border-box;widows:1;font-size-adjust:none;font-stretch:normal;">he Phoenix Biomedical Campus has grown to 1.6 million square feet on 28 acres since its inception 15 years ago — and there is even more construction planned for the downtown Phoenix campus.</p> <p class="content__segment" style="font:18px/27px acta, georgia, "times new roman", serif;color:rgb(34, 34, 34);text-transform:none;text-indent:0px;letter-spacing:normal;word-spacing:0px;white-space:normal;box-sizing:border-box;widows:1;font-size-adjust:none;font-stretch:normal;">Banner Health, the state's largest health system, plans to build a clinic on or near the campus similar to its other nine primary care clinics throughout the Phoenix area. Last year, the Phoenix nonprofit forged an academic-medical partnership with University of Arizona with the<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span><a style="transition:color 100ms ease-out, border-color 100ms ease-out;color:rgb(37, 79, 156);text-decoration:none;border-bottom-width:1px;border-bottom-style:solid;box-sizing:border-box;" href="http://www.bizjournals.com/phoenix/print-edition/2015/04/10/what-1-2-billion-means-to-banner-ua-and-the-state.html" target="_blank">$1.2 billion purchase of the University of Arizona Health Network</a>.</p> <p class="content__segment" style="font:18px/27px acta, georgia, "times new roman", serif;color:rgb(34, 34, 34);text-transform:none;text-indent:0px;letter-spacing:normal;word-spacing:0px;white-space:normal;box-sizing:border-box;widows:1;font-size-adjust:none;font-stretch:normal;"> <span style="font:18px/27px acta, georgia, "times new roman", serif;color:rgb(34, 34, 34);text-transform:none;text-indent:0px;letter-spacing:normal;word-spacing:0px;float:none;display:inline !important;white-space:normal;widows:1;font-size-adjust:none;font-stretch:normal;">Last year, the city of Phoenix authorized a deal that will allow Arizona State University to develop a<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></span> <a style="font:18px/27px acta, georgia, "times new roman", serif;outline:0px;transition:color 100ms ease-out, border-color 100ms ease-out;color:rgb(32, 69, 135);text-transform:none;text-indent:0px;letter-spacing:normal;text-decoration:none;word-spacing:0px;border-bottom-width:1px;border-bottom-style:solid;white-space:normal;box-sizing:border-box;widows:1;font-size-adjust:none;font-stretch:normal;" href="http://www.bizjournals.com/phoenix/blog/health-care-daily/2015/05/phoenix-agrees-to-asu-nantworks-biomedical-project.html" target="_blank">health solutions campus</a> <span style="font:18px/27px acta, georgia, "times new roman", serif;color:rgb(34, 34, 34);text-transform:none;text-indent:0px;letter-spacing:normal;word-spacing:0px;float:none;display:inline !important;white-space:normal;widows:1;font-size-adjust:none;font-stretch:normal;"> <span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span>on seven acres north of Filmore Street. Phase I of that project is a 200,000-square-foot building to be built in partnership with California-based NantWorks LLC, which is owned by billionaire Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong.</span> </p> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-start" aria-hidden="true"></span> <p class="content__segment" style="font:18px/27px acta, georgia, "times new roman", serif;color:rgb(34, 34, 34);text-transform:none;text-indent:0px;letter-spacing:normal;word-spacing:0px;white-space:normal;box-sizing:border-box;widows:1;font-size-adjust:none;font-stretch:normal;">The city has executed a lease agreement with ASU for that first phase, said<a target="_blank" style="transition:color 100ms ease-out, border-color 100ms ease-out;color:rgb(37, 79, 156);text-decoration:none;border-bottom-width:1px;border-bottom-style:solid;box-sizing:border-box;" href="http://www.bizjournals.com/phoenix/search/results?q=Robyn%20Sahid">Robyn Sahid</a>, program manager for the city of Phoenix.</p> <p class="content__segment" style="font:18px/27px acta, georgia, "times new roman", serif;color:rgb(34, 34, 34);text-transform:none;text-indent:0px;letter-spacing:normal;word-spacing:0px;white-space:normal;box-sizing:border-box;widows:1;font-size-adjust:none;font-stretch:normal;">Also last year, the Phoenix City Council authorized the city to enter an agreement with University of Arizona to allow UA to have development rights on about three acres' worth of building pads located between Fillmore,<a target="_blank" style="transition:color 100ms ease-out, border-color 100ms ease-out;color:rgb(37, 79, 156);text-decoration:none;border-bottom-width:1px;border-bottom-style:solid;box-sizing:border-box;" href="http://www.bizjournals.com/phoenix/search/results?q=Van%20Buren">Van Buren</a>, Fifth and Seventh streets, Sahid said.</p> <p class="content__segment" style="font:18px/27px acta, georgia, "times new roman", serif;color:rgb(34, 34, 34);text-transform:none;text-indent:0px;letter-spacing:normal;word-spacing:0px;white-space:normal;box-sizing:border-box;widows:1;font-size-adjust:none;font-stretch:normal;">UA is in the process of building its $136 million Biomedical Sciences Partnership building, which will house industry partners to conduct bioscience research. That 10-story, 245,000-square-foot structure is expected to open in January 2017. It will be home for the UA College of Medicine-Phoenix Center for Applied Nanoscience and Biomedicine.<br style="box-sizing:border-box;"></p> <p class="content__segment" style="font:18px/27px acta, georgia, "times new roman", serif;color:rgb(34, 34, 34);text-transform:none;text-indent:0px;letter-spacing:normal;word-spacing:0px;white-space:normal;box-sizing:border-box;widows:1;font-size-adjust:none;font-stretch:normal;">Since the inception of the campus, the city of Phoenix has invested $82.5 million, which primarily consists of land acquisition, infrastructure upgrade, building rehabilitation and construction of the first building on that campus, which is the headquarters for the Translational Genomics Research Institute and the International Genomics Consortium.</p> <p class="content__segment" style="font:18px/27px acta, georgia, "times new roman", serif;color:rgb(34, 34, 34);text-transform:none;text-indent:0px;letter-spacing:normal;word-spacing:0px;white-space:normal;box-sizing:border-box;widows:1;font-size-adjust:none;font-stretch:normal;">But the total investment of all the partners on the campus is $526 million, which includes the UA buildings, the cancer center jointly developed by Dignity Health and UA, the UA medical school and a parking garage.</p> <div class="truncated-content fade in" style="font:18px/27px acta, georgia, "times new roman", serif;transition:opacity 0.15s ease-out;color:rgb(34, 34, 34);text-transform:none;text-indent:0px;letter-spacing:normal;word-spacing:0px;white-space:normal;box-sizing:border-box;widows:1;font-size-adjust:none;font-stretch:normal;opacity:1;"> <p class="content__segment" style="box-sizing:border-box;">A Tripp-Umbach study released in 2014 showed the<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span><a style="transition:color 100ms ease-out, border-color 100ms ease-out;color:rgb(37, 79, 156);text-decoration:none;border-bottom-width:1px;border-bottom-style:solid;box-sizing:border-box;" href="http://www.bizjournals.com/phoenix/blog/health-care-daily/2014/12/study-economic-impact-of-phoenix-biomedical-campus.html" target="_blank">economic impact of the Phoenix Biomedical Campus</a><span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span>was $1.3 billion, while UA's medical school had a $961.6 million impact.<br style="box-sizing:border-box;"></p> <p class="content__segment" style="box-sizing:border-box;">The city is negotiating to<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span><a style="transition:color 100ms ease-out, border-color 100ms ease-out;color:rgb(37, 79, 156);text-decoration:none;border-bottom-width:1px;border-bottom-style:solid;box-sizing:border-box;" href="http://www.bizjournals.com/phoenix/blog/health-care-daily/2016/02/this-biotech-billionaire-plans-bigger-expansions.html" target="_blank">sell the TGen headquarters to Soon-Shiong</a>, said Christine Mackay, community and economic development director for Phoenix.</p> <p class="content__segment" style="box-sizing:border-box;">While the campus has focused on bioscience and health care, it has a new tenant — UA's Eller College of Management — that, on first blush, has nothing to do with the industry.</p> <p class="content__segment" style="box-sizing:border-box;"> <a target="_blank" style="transition:color 100ms ease-out, border-color 100ms ease-out;color:rgb(37, 79, 156);text-decoration:none;border-bottom-width:1px;border-bottom-style:solid;box-sizing:border-box;" href="http://www.bizjournals.com/phoenix/search/results?q=Paulo%20Goes">Paulo Goes</a>, the new dean of the Eller College of Management, said moving to the downtown campus makes sense for Eller.</p> <p class="content__segment" style="box-sizing:border-box;">"Our strategic direction and our focus on health care, digital leadership, entrepreneurship and innovation well align with the business landscape of the Valley," Goes said. "Phoenix is thriving with world class organizations and we see a great opportunity to partner on strategic programs and executive education. And more than 33,000 Eller alumni call it home."</p> <p class="content__segment" style="box-sizing:border-box;">Phoenix Vice Mayor Kate Gallego said the growth of the campus has helped put the city on the national and international map in terms of bioscience.</p> <p class="content__segment" style="box-sizing:border-box;">“The Phoenix Biomedical Campus has grown into the foundation for Arizona’s growing biomedical industry and helped to put the region on the national map as a cutting-edge center for research and medical collaboration,” she said. “It’s exciting to have Phoenix at the center of some of our most promising treatments to emerge in years for chronic and deadly diseases.”</p> </div> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-end" aria-hidden="true"></span> </html></div>https://biomedicalphoenix.com/Lists/News/Attachments/15/Phoenix-Business-Journal.jpg2016-07-19T07:00:00ZCity of Phoenix
Phoenix Business Journal - TGen teams up with Scottsdale family to take on rare childhood diseasePhoenix Business Journal - TGen teams up with Scottsdale family to take on rare childhood disease<div class="ExternalClassD3FEF09B853C4896A1B4AC1C8FDF1550"><html> <p>​<a target="_blank" href="http://www.bizjournals.com/phoenix/blog/health-care-daily/2016/07/tgen-teams-up-with-scottsdale-family-to-take-on.html">http://www.bizjournals.com/phoenix/blog/health-care-daily/2016/07/tgen-teams-up-with-scottsdale-family-to-take-on.html</a></p> <p class="content__segment">SCOTTSDALE – Wylder Laffoon was just seven months old when his parents, Steven and <a target="_blank">Shannon Laffoon</a>, learned their son had a rare, genetic disease that meant he would not live past age 3.</p> <p class="content__segment">Wylder died when he was three years old in July 2012 of Niemann-Pick Type A, but his legacy lives on through the <a target="_blank" href="http://wyldernation.org/"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0066cc">Wylder Nation Foundation</font></span></a>. His parents founded the nonprofit to support doctors and researchers who are trying to find a cure for the disease.</p> <h4 class="o_gEPV1NTWQkXX0HDg_0 as_gEPV1NTWQkXX0HDg_0 inheritFontFamily"> <p class="content__segment">“The mission is to improve the lives of children diagnosed with these rare diseases…and provide hope by accelerating the discovery and development of treatment options,” <a target="_blank" href="http://www.bizjournals.com/phoenix/search/results?q=Steven%20Laffoon"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0066cc">Steven Laffoon</font></span></a> said.</p> <p class="content__segment">The foundation is donating funds to TGen, the Phoenix research initiative that is studying a group in Chile that carries the genetic markers for Niemann-Pick.</p> </h4> <aside class="inset inset--major hidden--print hidden--lg hidden--xl"> <h4 class="o_gEPV1NTWQkXX0HDg_0 as_gEPV1NTWQkXX0HDg_0 inheritFontFamily"> </h4> <div class="module module--ruled"> <h4 class="o_gEPV1NTWQkXX0HDg_0 as_gEPV1NTWQkXX0HDg_0 inheritFontFamily"> </h4> </div> <h4 class="o_gEPV1NTWQkXX0HDg_0 as_gEPV1NTWQkXX0HDg_0 inheritFontFamily"></h4> </aside> <h4 class="o_gEPV1NTWQkXX0HDg_0 as_gEPV1NTWQkXX0HDg_0 inheritFontFamily"> <p class="content__segment"> <strong>Death by Age 4</strong> </p> <p class="content__segment">Niemann-Pick type A is the most severe type of the disease, causing children to die in early childhood. It causes children to grow an enlarged spleen and liver, dangerously slows their rate of growth, damages their lungs, and inhibits their mental abilities and mobility. There is no cure and death is guaranteed.</p> <p class="content__segment"> <a target="_blank" href="https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/niemann-pick-disease"> <span style="text-decoration:underline;"> <font color="#0066cc">Niemann-Pick</font> </span> </a> has three different types – type A, B, and C, (which can be split into C1 and C2. Type A and B are the more rare forms of the disease, although children who have type B can reach adulthood.</p> <aside class="inset inset--major hidden--print hidden--lg hidden--xl"><div class="xs-only__expander sm-only__expander "><div class="ad-container ad-container--in-inset"><div data-params="{"set":"1","pos_test":"c1_2"}" data-mapping="[[[300,250],[300,600]],[[300,250],[320,50]]]" data-sizes="[[300,250],[300,600,[320,50]]" data-position="c1_2" class="gpt"></div></div></div></aside> <p class="content__segment">“At the root cause, they have a change in their DNA blueprint that affects an enzyme …something in the body that metabolizes the things we eat, for example, into other chemicals,” said <a target="_blank" href="http://www.bizjournals.com/phoenix/search/results?q=Matt%20Huentelman"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0066cc">Matt Huentelman</font></span></a>, professor of neurogenomics at TGen. “And the defect in that enzyme forces the build up of something that is very toxic to the kids. And that ends up in…eventually, death for the kids.”</p><p class="content__segment"><strong>TGen's Quest to Unlock a Genetic Code</strong></p><p class="content__segment">TGen is researching the type B variant of Niemann-Pick by studying a sample population of Chile residents who share the same genetic markers that led to them having the disease. But they experience the disease differently. Some of them have a mild, slow progressing form, while the disease is progressing rapidly in others.</p><div class="truncated-content fade in"><p class="content__segment">By examining the genome of those in the sample population, researchers at TGen hope to identify what is causing the different reactions to the disease. While a cure is still a lofty dream, if researchers can identify what’s causing different reactions in those with the disease, it might be possible to develop a treatment that would move people from the rapid-progression group to the slower-progression group, Huentelman said.</p></div></h4> <p class="content__segment"> <br> </p> </html></div>2016-07-12T07:00:00ZTGen
UA College of Medicine – Phoenix Holds Sixth GraduationUA College of Medicine – Phoenix Holds Sixth Graduation<div class="ExternalClass5EB88AAD056E47CA9025CC81FB8CF813"><html> <p>​</p> <h4 class="o_gEPV1NTWQkXX0HDg_0 as_gEPV1NTWQkXX0HDg_0 inheritFontFamily"> <span style="font-size:11pt;"> <strong> <font color="#000000" face="Helvetica">College Confers Medical Degrees on 66 Physicians, Addressing State’s Doctor Shortage</font> </strong></span></h4><p><a href="http://phoenixmed.arizona.edu/commencement2016" target="_blank">http://phoenixmed.arizona.edu/commencement2016</a></p><p><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;"><span style="color:black;">Sixty-six University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix medical students officially became physicians last Monday during ceremonies that marked the sixth graduation for the downtown Phoenix medical school.<br></span> </span></p><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;"> </span><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;"><span style="color:black;">Led by a bagpipe and drum corps, commencement exercises began with a procession from the College to Phoenix Symphony Hall, where the graduates were officially conferred their Doctor of Medicine degrees. The UA College of Medicine – Phoenix has now graduated 273 physicians in six years. The school opened in 2007 in what was then the largest city in the nation without an allopathic (MD-granting) medical school. The College is helping address the critical shortage of physicians in Arizona. </span>   </span><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;"> </span><p><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size:11pt;"> </span><a href="http://phoenixmed.arizona.edu/about/college-glance/leadership/deans-office/deans-message/meet-interim-dean" target="_blank"><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;"> <span style="text-decoration:underline;"> <font color="#0066cc">Kenneth S. Ramos, MD, PhD</font> </span> </span></a><span style="font-size:11pt;">, interim dean of the UA College of Medicine – Phoenix, told the graduates they represent “the most important element in the amazing evolution and transformation of the College of Medicine – Phoenix as we strive to achieve our place among the best institutions of higher learning in educating physicians and advancing the frontiers of medicine.</span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">“We send you out as ambassadors of the College of Medicine – Phoenix,” Dr. Ramos said. “Please become the physicians that your patients value, trust and respect.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size:11pt;">A hooding ceremony and the recitation of the oath were part of the festivities, which included an address by Jeffrey M. Trent, PhD, president and research director for the </span><a class="ext" href="https://www.tgen.org/" target="_blank"><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0066cc">Translational Genomics Research Institute<span class="ext" style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;"><span class="element-invisible" style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;"> (link is external)</span></span></font></span></a><span style="font-size:11pt;"> (TGen) in Phoenix.</span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">“You — the class of 2016 — are the first generation of physicians who will truly be charged with putting into medical practice the growing information that is clinically actionable in the 3 billion letters of our DNA genome,” Dr. Trent said, adding that with Precision Medicine, this generation of doctors will be able to administer “the right drug for the right patient at the right time.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">Dr. Trent challenged the graduates to ask themselves four questions: What will you contribute, what will you do about faith, what will you do with love and how will you keep fun in your life? “There exists no secret formula for achieving a balanced life, but as for making a difference each day, I ask that you promise your best effort,” he said.</span></p><p><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;"> </span><span id="ms-rterangepaste-start" style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;"></span><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">Graduating senior Aaron Klassen, MD, who will begin his Emergency Medicine residency this summer at the Mayo School of Graduate Education in Rochester, Minn., delivered the student address.</span></p><p><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">“The attribute that we all shared four years ago is that we were already doctors,” he said. “We lacked the knowledge, the training, the experience and most importantly the diploma, but the core of who a physician is — a person who sacrifices for others, seeks to relieve suffering, finds problems and creates solutions — that essence was already present in the classmates that I met in July 2012 on Day One.”</span></p><p><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">Dr. Klassen said medical school has “given us profound new opportunities to be the people we were when we started four years ago.”</span></p><p><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">Of the 66 Class of 2016 graduates, one-third are pursing primary care fields, the most critical shortage facing Arizona, and 24 will be in residency programs in Phoenix or Tucson. Overall, the students will continue their studies at programs in 20 states.</span></p><p><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">The ceremony capped a day of celebration that began with a faculty awards breakfast, where medical students recognized outstanding faculty members. The day also included a senior luncheon with graduates cited for awards by specialty and achievement in the community, for humanism and scholarship.</span></p><p><strong style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">The following graduates were recognized:</strong></p><p><strong style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">Pillar Awards:</strong></p><ul><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;"><li><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">Sindhu Pandurangi, MD, Pillar of Scholarship Award.</span></li><li><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">Aaron Klassen, MD, Pillar of Leadership Award.</span></li><li><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">Sravanthi Vegunta, MD, Pillar of Community Award.</span></li><li><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">Lilanthi Balasuriya, MD, Pillar of Humanism Award.</span></li></span></ul><p><strong style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">Clerkship Awards:</strong></p><ul><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;"><li><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">Joseph Seelbaugh, MD, Family and Community Medicine.</span></li><li><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">James Gentry, MD, Internal Medicine.</span></li><li><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">Aqib Zehri, MD, Neurology.</span></li><li><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">Gray Roberge, MD, Obstetrics and Gynecology.</span></li><li><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">Gianna Romano, MD, Pediatrics.</span></li><li><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">Lilanthi Balasuriya, MD, Psychiatry.</span></li><li><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">Ameya Jategaonkar, MD, Surgery.</span></li></span></ul><p><strong style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;"><a href="http://phoenixmed.arizona.edu/education/degree-programs/md-program/curriculum/certificates-distinctions" target="_blank"><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0066cc">Certificates of Distinction</font></span></a>:</strong></p><ul><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;"><li><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size:11pt;">James MacKenzie, MD, </span><a href="http://phoenixmed.arizona.edu/education/degree-programs/md-program/curriculum/certificates-distinction/global-health/global-health" target="_blank"><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0066cc">Global Health</font></span></a><span style="font-size:11pt;">.</span></span></li><li><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">Maryn Torner, MD, Global Health.</span></li><li><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size:11pt;">Trenden Flanigan, MD, </span><a href="http://phoenixmed.arizona.edu/rural-health" target="_blank"><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0066cc">Rural Health</font></span></a><span style="font-size:11pt;">.</span></span></li></span></ul><p><strong style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">Distinction in <a href="http://phoenixmed.arizona.edu/education/degree-programs/md-program/curriculum/certificates-distinction/service-and-community-health" target="_blank"><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0066cc">Service Learning</font></span></a>:</strong></p><ul><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;"><li><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">Jaymeson Arthur, MD.</span></li><li><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">Mandy Boltz, MD.</span></li><li><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">Jacob DeMenna, MD.</span></li><li><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">Trenden Flanigan, MD.</span></li><li><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">Brandon Hammond, MD.</span></li><li><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">Laura Hoffman, MD.</span></li><li><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">Brett Larsen, MD.</span></li><li><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">James Lish, MD.</span></li><li><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">James MacKenzie, MD.</span></li><li><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">Rimpi Saini, MD.</span></li><li><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">Michelle Sipe, MD.</span></li><li><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">Shravan Sridhar, MD.</span></li><li><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">Sravanthi Vegunta, MD.</span></li></span></ul><p><strong style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">The following faculty were recognized:</strong></p><ul><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;"><li><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;"><a href="http://phoenixmed.arizona.edu/directory/bios/moffitt" target="_blank"><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0066cc">Marícela P. Moffitt, MD, MPH</font></span></a><span style="font-size:11pt;">, was chosen the Stuart D. Flynn, MD, Master Educator Teaching Excellence award winner by graduating students — recognizing extraordinary accomplishments in all aspects of education over all four years of medical school. She is Director of the College’s </span><a href="http://phoenixmed.arizona.edu/education/md-degree-programs/md-program/curriculum/pre-clerkships/doctoring-year-1-2" target="_blank"><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0066cc">Doctoring Curriculum</font></span></a><span style="font-size:11pt;"> and practices at the Carl T. Hayden VA in Phoenix. </span><ul><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;"><li><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">Educator of the Year, Department of Internal Medicine, chosen by second-year students.</span></li><li><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">Excellence in Teaching by a Block or Course, Doctoring, chosen by the second-year students</span></li></span></ul></span></li><li><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size:11pt;">John V. Gallagher, III, MD, clinical assistant professor in </span><a href="http://phoenixmed.arizona.edu/departments/emergency-medicine" target="_blank"><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0066cc">Emergency Medicine</font></span></a><span style="font-size:11pt;">: Excellence in Clinical Teaching in an Elective Course, chosen by graduating students</span></span></li><li><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">Ara Feinstein, MD, director of the Surgery clerkship: Excellence in Clinical Teaching by a Clerkship, chosen by third-year students</span></li><li><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">Mark A. Fischione, MD, Department of Pathology: Educator of the Year, chosen by first-year students</span></li></span></ul><p><strong style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">House Officer of the Year, chosen by third-year students:</strong></p><ul><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;"><li><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">Family and Community Medicine – Heatherann Brunell, DO, HonorHealth-Scottsdale.</span></li><li><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">Internal Medicine – Fakhri Kalolwala, MD, Maricopa Integrated Health System.</span></li><li><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">Obstetrics and Gynecology – Iris Adipue, MD, Phoenix Integrated Residency Program.</span></li><li><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">Pediatrics – Kathryn VanderVelde, MD, Phoenix Children’s Hospital/Maricopa Integrated Health System.</span></li><li><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">Psychiatry – Trace Cochran, MD, MPH, Banner – University Medical Center Phoenix.</span></li><li><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">Surgery – Matthew Marini, MD, Banner – University Medical Center Phoenix.</span></li></span></ul><p><strong style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;">Media Contact:</strong></p><p><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;"><a class="mailto" href="mailto:marianlfrank@email.arizona.edu" target="_blank"><span style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0066cc">Marian Frank<span class="mailto" style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;"><span class="element-invisible" style="font-family:"Segoe UI","Segoe",Tahoma,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-size:11pt;"> (link sends e-mail)</span></span></font></span></a><br style="font-size:11pt;"><span style="font-size:11pt;"> Phone: 602-827-2022</span></span><br><br></p></html></div>https://biomedicalphoenix.com/Lists/News/Attachments/9/uofa.png2016-06-15T07:00:00ZUA
MRSA detection technology developed by TGen-NAU is granted first patentMRSA detection technology developed by TGen-NAU is granted first patent<div class="ExternalClass2AFF7E49290D48D59EEF4F86F2E8F2C7"><html> <p> <strong> <em>Test for 'superbug' bacterial infections created by DxNA under license from TGen-NAU</em> </strong> </p> <p> <strong>PHOENIX, Ariz. — June 15, 2016 —</strong> <strong> </strong>Antibiotic-resistant infections should be easier to detect, and hospitals could become safer, thanks to a technology developed by the <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=Jj/0NKbnVEY%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=http://www.tgen.org/"><span style="text-decoration:underline;">Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen)</span></a> and Northern Arizona University (NAU), and protected under a patent issued by Australia.<br> <br>Soon, similar patent approvals are expected by the U.S., Canada, European Union, Japan, Brazil and other nations for this "superbug" test developed by TGen and NAU, and licensed to DxNA LLC, a company based in St. George, Utah.<br> <br>"This rapid, 1-hour test will precisely identify a family of antibiotic-resistant <em>Staph</em> infections we broadly refer to as MRSA," said Dr. Paul Keim, Director of TGen's Pathogen Genomics Division, or TGen North, based in Flagstaff. <br><br>"We hope this technology will be adopted worldwide by hospitals and clinics, and will help identify and isolate these dangerous and difficult-to-eliminate infections that have come to plague our medical institutions," said Dr. Keim, who also is the Cowden Endowed Chair of Microbiology at NAU, and Director of NAU's Center for Microbial Genetics and Genomics (MGGen). "The result should be more rapid diagnosis, improved treatment of patients, and reduced medical costs."<br> <br>MRSA — Methicillin-resistant <em>Staphylococcus aureus</em> — is an antibiotic-resistant form of the <em>Staph</em> bacteria that annually kills more Americans than HIV. <br><br>While MRSA technically refers to one particular strain of <em>Staph</em>, the genomics-based test developed by TGen, NAU and DxNA can precisely detect multiple types of drug-resistant <em>Staph</em> bacterial infections, including drug resistant Coagulase Negative Staphylococcus (CSN), a much more common infection than MRSA.<br> <br><em>Staph</em> infections are the most common hospital-acquired or associated infections. While most of the focus over the past few years has been on MRSA, in terms of incidence and total cost, strains of <em>Staph</em> other than MRSA are a much more common problem.<br> <br>Due to the increasing use of implantable biomaterials and medical devices, infections are increasingly caused by CNS. This is a type of <em>Staph</em> that is often resistant to multiple antibiotics and has a particular affinity for these devices.<br> <br>"Rapid identification and differentiation of these resistant bacteria is key to optimizing treatment decisions that significantly impact patient outcomes and cost of care," said David Taus, CEO of DxNA LLC. "Given that resistant CNS is a frequent pathogen in surgical site infections, orthopedic and cardiac device infections, and blood stream infections — among others — it is critical that we be able to rapidly identify and determine antibiotic resistance to provide for appropriate pre-surgical antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent infections and early and effective treatment when these infections do occur."<br> <br>Current molecular tests for MRSA all ignore CNS, rendering their results significantly less useful in treating patients given that drug resistant CNS infections are many times more common than MRSA.<br> <br>DxNA's <em>Staphylococcus Test</em> identifies and differentiates resistant and non-resistant strains of <em>Staph</em> and CNS. The test uses three separate proprietary biomarker targets and a proprietary methodology to determine which types of <em>Staph</em> are present, and which carry the gene that causes antibiotic-resistance in these bacteria.<br> <br>"The test also is effective in identifying infected specimens where there are multiple types of <em>Staph</em>. The test will rapidly provide broader clinically-actionable results, improving antibiotic prophylaxis, early targeted intervention resulting in more effective treatment at lower costs," Taus said.<br> <br># # #<br> <br><strong>About TGen</strong><br> Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. TGen is focused on helping patients with neurological disorders, cancer, and diabetes, through cutting edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research towards patient benefit).  TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and rare complex diseases in adults and children. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities literally worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=Jj/0NKbnVEY%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=http://www.tgen.org/home.aspx"><span style="text-decoration:underline;">www.tgen.org</span></a>. Follow TGen on <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=Jj/0NKbnVEY%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=https://www.facebook.com/helptgen"><span style="text-decoration:underline;">Facebook</span></a>, <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=Jj/0NKbnVEY%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=https://www.linkedin.com/company/tgen"><span style="text-decoration:underline;">LinkedIn</span></a> and <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=Jj/0NKbnVEY%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=https://twitter.com/TGen"><span style="text-decoration:underline;">Twitter @TGen</span></a>.<br> <br><strong>Media Contact:</strong><br> Steve Yozwiak<br> TGen Senior Science Writer<br> 602-343-8704<br> <a target="_blank" href="mailto:syozwiak@tgen.org"><span style="text-decoration:underline;">syozwiak@tgen.org</span></a><br><span style="text-decoration:underline;"> </span><br><strong>About DxNA LLC</strong><br> <br>DxNA is a privately held company located in St. George Utah. It is a molecular diagnostics company that develops and distributes portable, fully-integrated systems and tests for infectious disease in the medical, agricultural, food safety, and biosecurity markets. The Company's systems and technologies enable rapid and precise molecular testing to take place on-site by allowing for otherwise complex laboratory procedures to be performed almost anywhere. DxNA's patented GeneSTAT® portable Real Time PCR molecular diagnostic testing system will allow individuals with minimal training to conduct accurate real-time diagnostic testing in virtually any location including laboratories, clinics, physician offices, emergency rooms or field settings. Designed with economy in mind, GeneSTAT is inherently less costly than the real time PCR systems typical of clinical laboratories.<br> <br><strong>About Northern Arizona University</strong><br> Northern Arizona University is a high-research university with a statewide enrollment of 28,000 students. More than 20,000 students attend the Flagstaff campus, with 8,000 students enrolled online and at Extended Campus sites statewide. Research in genetics, forestry and ecology has drawn international recognition to the university, which also is highly regarded for its education, business and engineering programs. NAU launched competency-based Personalized Learning in 2013, the first self-paced, online education program that cuts the cost and time to an undergraduate degree.</p> </html></div>2016-06-15T07:00:00ZTGen
Arizona bioscience job growth rate continues to outpace nationArizona bioscience job growth rate continues to outpace nation<div class="ExternalClassA6C92B25D7B24E6AA8AFE99CB437AE45"><html> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-start">​<span style="color:rgb(0, 46, 95);font-family:'open sans', sans-serif;font-size:1.75rem;line-height:1.4;background-color:window;">A</span><span style="color:rgb(0, 46, 95);font-family:'open sans', sans-serif;font-size:1.75rem;line-height:1.4;background-color:window;">rizona bioscience job growth rate continues to outpace nation</span><span style="color:rgb(0, 46, 95);font-family:'open sans', sans-serif;font-size:1.75rem;line-height:1.4;background-color:window;">​</span><br></br></span> <p style="box-sizing:inherit;text-rendering:optimizelegibility;margin:0px 0px 0.9375rem;padding:0px;line-height:1.6;font-family:'open sans', sans-serif;font-size:0.875rem;color:rgb(75, 75, 75);" class="date">March 29, 2016</p> <div style="box-sizing:inherit;margin:0px;padding:0px;color:rgb(75, 75, 75);font-family:'open sans', sans-serif;font-size:16px;line-height:24px;" class="entry-content"> <p style="box-sizing:inherit;text-rendering:optimizelegibility;margin:0px 0px 1.25rem;padding:0px;line-height:1.6;font-family:inherit;font-size:0.9375rem;">PHOENIX—Arizona’s bioscience industry has sustained its momentum and continues its long-standing trend of impressive job growth and high wages, a new report shows.</p> <p style="box-sizing:inherit;text-rendering:optimizelegibility;margin:0px 0px 1.25rem;padding:0px;line-height:1.6;font-family:inherit;font-size:0.9375rem;">In addition, risk capital reached its highest figure in four years, and all measures of bioscience tech transfer at Arizona universities are on the rise, with increases in startups, invention disclosures, patents, and licenses.</p> <p style="box-sizing:inherit;text-rendering:optimizelegibility;margin:0px 0px 1.25rem;padding:0px;line-height:1.6;font-family:inherit;font-size:0.9375rem;">However, declining research dollars and expenditures raise concerns about the industry’s long-term capacity to keep adding jobs. National Institutes of Health grants and bioscience-related academic research-and-development expenditures both dropped in the latest year of data and are failing to keep pace with the nation.</p> <p style="box-sizing:inherit;text-rendering:optimizelegibility;margin:0px 0px 1.25rem;padding:0px;line-height:1.6;font-family:inherit;font-size:0.9375rem;">The Phoenix-based Flinn Foundation commissioned the latest performance analysis as part of its coordination of Arizona’s Bioscience Roadmap, a long-term strategy to guide the state through 2025. The data released in the March 29 report, the first new metrics in two years, was provided by TEConomy Partners, formerly Battelle Technology Partnership Practice.</p> <p style="box-sizing:inherit;text-rendering:optimizelegibility;margin:0px 0px 1.25rem;padding:0px;line-height:1.6;font-family:inherit;font-size:0.9375rem;">“There is evidence of innovation throughout Arizona and many positive economic signs, as the number of high-paying bioscience jobs continues to increase at an impressive rate,” said Mitch Horowitz, principal and managing director of TEConomy Partners. “However, we are concerned about the declines in NIH grants and R&D bio expenditures. If creative steps are not taken to reverse these trends, the state’s bioscience industry will be hard-pressed to keep growing.”</p> <p style="box-sizing:inherit;text-rendering:optimizelegibility;margin:0px 0px 1.25rem;padding:0px;line-height:1.6;font-family:inherit;font-size:0.9375rem;">Arizona’s Bioscience Roadmap was commissioned by the Flinn Foundation, a philanthropic grantmaking organization, in 2002 with a goal of increasing access for Arizonans to health innovations while diversifying and strengthening the state’s economy. The long-term strategy was updated in 2014 to lead the state through 2025. The Roadmap’s vision is for Arizona to become globally competitive and a national leader in the biosciences in such fields as precision medicine, cancer, neurosciences, bioengineering, diagnostics, and agricultural biotechnology.</p> <p style="box-sizing:inherit;text-rendering:optimizelegibility;margin:0px 0px 1.25rem;padding:0px;line-height:1.6;font-family:inherit;font-size:0.9375rem;">The most recent data show:</p> <ul style="box-sizing:inherit;margin:0px 0px 1.25rem 1.1rem;padding:0px;font-family:inherit;font-size:1rem;line-height:1.6;list-style-position:outside;"> <li style="box-sizing:inherit;margin:0px;padding:0px;font-size:0.9375rem;">Arizona has added 36,700 bioscience jobs between 2002 and 2014, a 49 percent increase that brings today’s total to 110,410, including hospitals. Bioscience jobs have grown nationally at a 14 percent rate during this time.</li> <li style="box-sizing:inherit;margin:0px;padding:0px;font-size:0.9375rem;">The average salary of a bioscience worker is $61,823, compared to $46,514 for the state’s private sector. Bioscience salaries have increased 50 percent since 2002.</li> <li style="box-sizing:inherit;margin:0px;padding:0px;font-size:0.9375rem;">In 2015, Arizona saw its highest venture-capital investments for bioscience firms since 2011. The $82 million attracted is the third straight year of growth. It represents 0.56 percent of bioscience venture capital investments nationwide, the highest rate since 2011, but still well below the Roadmap’s goal.</li> <li style="box-sizing:inherit;margin:0px;padding:0px;font-size:0.9375rem;">NIH funding was $151 million in 2015, down from $158 million in 2014. Since the start of the Roadmap, Arizona’s NIH annual funding has grown 12 percent compared to 40 percent for the top-10 funded states, which Arizona generally had met or exceeded during previous years. NIH grants are the gold standard in the biosciences.</li> <li style="box-sizing:inherit;margin:0px;padding:0px;font-size:0.9375rem;">The value of bioscience R&D expenditures was $451 million in 2014, a slight drop from 2013. Arizona’s growth rate of 55 percent since 2002 falls short of the national growth rate of 78 percent.</li> <li style="box-sizing:inherit;margin:0px;padding:0px;font-size:0.9375rem;">All measures of bioscience tech transfer at Arizona universities are on the rise and are outperforming other university research disciplines in tech-transfer activities. University bio-related startups increased 24 percent in 2014-15 compared to the previous two years. During this same time, there was a 72 percent increase in patents and a 54 percent increase in invention disclosures.</li> </ul> <p style="box-sizing:inherit;text-rendering:optimizelegibility;margin:0px 0px 1.25rem;padding:0px;line-height:1.6;font-family:inherit;font-size:0.9375rem;">Setting aside hospitals, the largest bioscience subsector, Arizona has 24,040 bioscience jobs in 1,284 establishments, with an annual wage of $76,360.</p> <p style="box-sizing:inherit;text-rendering:optimizelegibility;margin:0px 0px 1.25rem;padding:0px;line-height:1.6;font-family:inherit;font-size:0.9375rem;">“We are very encouraged by the continued growth of the bioscience industry and our best risk-capital performance in four years,” said Ron Shoopman, chair of Arizona’s Bioscience Roadmap Steering Committee. “But leaders must emerge in the state to make the necessary strategic research investments. If not, we risk falling behind in not only developing new treatments, but in the commercialization of this research, which is crucial for job growth and building a critical mass of companies.”</p> <p style="box-sizing:inherit;text-rendering:optimizelegibility;margin:0px 0px 1.25rem;padding:0px;line-height:1.6;font-family:inherit;font-size:0.9375rem;">There were a number of major developments in 2015 through partnerships and collaborations involving private-sector companies, Arizona’s public universities, hospitals, and research labs. For instance, Arizona State University and Nantworks, led by billionaire physician and entrepreneur Patrick Soon-Shiong, announced they will build a research hub on the Phoenix Biomedical Campus. On the same campus, the University of Arizona Cancer Center at Dignity Health St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center opened its new facility. Banner Health completed its acquisition of the University of Arizona Health Network and is investing in new hospital construction while becoming the academic partner of UA’s medical schools in Tucson and Phoenix.</p> <p style="box-sizing:inherit;text-rendering:optimizelegibility;margin:0px 0px 1.25rem;padding:0px;line-height:1.6;font-family:inherit;font-size:0.9375rem;">“As the new data show, the investments made during the early years of the Roadmap are paying huge dividends for Arizona today,” said Jack B. Jewett, president & CEO of the Flinn Foundation. “The ongoing collaboration among our leading institutions has created an opportunity for innovation and for the bioscience industry to continue its momentum through the years.”</p> <p style="box-sizing:inherit;text-rendering:optimizelegibility;margin:0px 0px 1.25rem;padding:0px;line-height:1.6;font-family:inherit;font-size:0.9375rem;">The next data report will be released in 2018.</p> <p style="box-sizing:inherit;text-rendering:optimizelegibility;margin:0px 0px 1.25rem;padding:0px;line-height:1.6;font-family:inherit;font-size:0.9375rem;">The Flinn Foundation is a privately endowed, philanthropic grantmaking organization established in 1965 by Dr. Robert S. and Irene P. Flinn to improve the quality of life in Arizona to benefit future generations. In addition to advancing the biosciences, the foundation supports the Flinn Scholarship, a merit-based college scholarship program, arts and culture, and the Arizona Center for Civic Leadership.​</p> </div> <span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span> <p>​</p> </html></div>2016-03-29T07:00:00ZFlinn Foundation
State Compacts Enable Quality Healthcare DeliveryState Compacts Enable Quality Healthcare Delivery<div class="ExternalClass8384025238FA4323ABF6060842081E07"><html>​<a target="_blank" href="http://www.azbio.org/state-compacts-enable-quality-healthcare-delivery" title="Permalink to State Compacts Enable Quality Healthcare Delivery" rel="bookmark" style="font-family:inherit;font-size:20px;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;line-height:1.35em;border:0px;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;color:inherit;background-color:rgb(252, 252, 252);">State Compacts Enable Quality Healthcare Delivery</a><br><header class="entry-header" style="zoom:1;margin-bottom:20px;color:rgb(51, 51, 51);font-family:'helvetica neue', helvetica, arial, 'lucida grande', sans-serif;font-size:13px;line-height:19.5px;background-color:rgb(252, 252, 252);"><div class="entry-meta" style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-size:12px;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;color:rgb(143, 143, 143);">Posted on <a target="_blank" href="http://www.azbio.org/state-compacts-enable-quality-healthcare-delivery" title="7:40 pm" rel="bookmark" style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;color:rgb(94, 94, 94);">Mon/28/March</a> <span class="byline" style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;">by <span class="author vcard" style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;"><a target="_blank" class="url fn n" href="http://www.azbio.org/author/joan-koerber-walker" title="View all posts by Joan Koerber-Walker" rel="author" style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;color:rgb(94, 94, 94);">Joan Koerber-Walker</a></span></span></div></header><div class="entry-content" style="border:0px;font-family:'helvetica neue', helvetica, arial, 'lucida grande', sans-serif;font-size:13px;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;zoom:1;line-height:1.6em;color:rgb(102, 102, 102);background-color:rgb(252, 252, 252);"><div class="shareaholic-canvas" data-app-id="11403751" data-app="share_buttons" data-title="State Compacts Enable Quality Healthcare Delivery" data-link="http://www.azbio.org/state-compacts-enable-quality-healthcare-delivery" data-summary="" style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;"></div><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;">Arizona has a shortage of healthcare professionals.  Four bills at the Arizona Legislature are designed to help address the problem.<span style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;"></span></p><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;"><img class="aligncenter size-large wp-image-14214 ms-rte-paste-setimagesize" src="http://11759-presscdn-0-15.pagely.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/Quality-Healthcare-2-1024x408.jpg" alt="Quality Healthcare 2" width="720" height="287" style="clear:both;display:block;margin:0px auto;max-width:100%;height:auto;" /></p><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;"> </p><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;">Arizona’s growing population has created a growing need for healthcare professionals. The Arizona Department of Health Services annually reports the data by census tracts showing communities that meet the following criteria as established by federal regulation.  The March, 2015 report which lists <a target="_blank" href="http://www.azdhs.gov/documents/prevention/health-systems-development/shortage-designation/azmuaannualrpt.pdf" style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;color:rgb(30, 115, 190);transition:all 0.2s ease;">Arizona‘s Medically Underserved Areas</a> for primary healthcare providers alone spans 17 pages.</p><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;"> </p><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;">Four bills at the Arizona Legislature are designed to help address Arizona’s shortage of medical professionals by allowing physicians, nurses, psychologists, and physical therapists <strong style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;">the option</strong> to apply for a “compact license” which allows them to provide their healthcare services in both their state of original licensure (their “home state”) and also in states that have joined the compact.</p><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;">The bills, sponsored by Representative Heather Carter have passed the Arizona House of Representatives and are now awaiting action in the Arizona Senate.   They are:</p><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;"> </p><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;"><a target="_blank" href="http://www.azleg.gov/DocumentsForBill.asp?Bill_Number=2362&Session_Id=115&image.x=0&image.y=0" style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;color:rgb(30, 115, 190);transition:all 0.2s ease;">HB2362</a> nurse licensure compact<br><a target="_blank" href="http://www.azleg.gov/DocumentsForBill.asp?Bill_Number=2502&Session_Id=115&image.x=0&image.y=0" style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;color:rgb(30, 115, 190);transition:all 0.2s ease;">HB2502</a> medical licensure compact<br><a target="_blank" href="http://www.azleg.gov/DocumentsForBill.asp?Bill_Number=2503&Session_Id=115&image.x=0&image.y=0" style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;color:rgb(30, 115, 190);transition:all 0.2s ease;">HB2503</a> psychologists; licensure compact<br><a target="_blank" href="http://www.azleg.gov/DocumentsForBill.asp?Bill_Number=2504&Session_Id=115&image.x=0&image.y=0" style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;color:rgb(30, 115, 190);transition:all 0.2s ease;">HB2504</a> physical therapy licensure compact</br></br></br></p><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;"> </p><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;">Healthcare compacts create a pathway to expedite the licensing of physicians, nurses, psychologists, or physical therapists respectively that are seeking to provide their healthcare services in multiple states, improve license portability, and improve access, efficiency and quality of care for patients.</p><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;"> </p><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;"><strong style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;">Compacts are not new concept. They cover a wide range of industries and circumstances.  One, the Driver’s License Compact, applies to many of us.</strong></p><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;"><strong style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;"> </strong></p><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;">The <a target="_blank" href="http://apps.csg.org/ncic/Compact.aspx?id=56" style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;color:rgb(30, 115, 190);transition:all 0.2s ease;">Driver License Compact</a> which applies to all <a target="_blank" href="https://www.azdot.gov/mvd/driver-services/LicenseInfo/license-classes" style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;color:rgb(30, 115, 190);transition:all 0.2s ease;">classes of drivers licenses</a> is an interstate compact used by States of the United States to exchange information concerning license suspensions and traffic violations of non-residents and forward the information to the state where they are licensed known as the “home state”.  Its theme is <em style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;">One Driver, One License, One Record.</em>  Arizona was one of the early joiners in 1963.  Under this compact, a driver with an Arizona Driver’s License is required to follow the laws of the state they are driving in.  Should an infraction occur outside the state, and the driver be convicted in that state, the points and infractions apply to the Arizona Driver’s record just like if the infraction occurred in Arizona.</p><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;"> </p><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;"><strong style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;">Licensing Healthcare Professionals at the Speed of Business</strong></p><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;"><strong style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;"> </strong></p><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;">Just as the Driver’s Licenses Compact enables transportation and commerce systems across state lines, healthcare compacts provide opportunity to enhance healthcare service delivery.  For example, HB2502 (where Arizona would join the Physician Compact) facilitates speedier medical licensure process for physicians seeking licensure in multiple states. This reduces licensing administrative burdens for physicians and their employers while reducing redundant licensing requirements across states. This increased license portability streamlines the licensing process for physicians to obtain licenses in multiple states.</p><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;"> </p><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;"><strong style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;">Increased Access to Healthcare Services</strong></p><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;"><strong style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;"> </strong></p><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;">Regular preventive healthcare visits and access to care for people with acute or chronic conditions are essential health services.  When patients face long wait times in accessing their healthcare professionals, conditions can go undetected or untreated resulting in more serious health problems and increased healthcare costs later.  In addition to increasing access to safe, quality healthcare in rural and underserved areas, a healthcare provider licensed through the compact will be able to improve access, efficiency and quality of care by utilizing telemedicine technologies.</p><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;"> </p><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;"><strong style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;">Patients are Protected</strong></p><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;"><strong style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;"> </strong></p><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;">The Healthcare Compacts protect patients by maintaining Arizona’s authority to regulate the applicable healthcare services provided here in Arizona.  In all cases, Arizona maintains its state autonomy and control over the practice of medicine and protecting patient safety and welfare and the practice of medicine or the associated healthcare service will continue to occur in the state where the patient is located.</p><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;"> </p><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;"><strong style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;">Arizona Industry Groups support the Healthcare Compacts</strong></p><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;"><strong style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;"> </strong></p><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;"><a target="_blank" href="http://www.azleg.gov/DocumentsForBill.asp?Bill_Number=2362&Session_Id=115&image.x=0&image.y=0" style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;color:rgb(30, 115, 190);transition:all 0.2s ease;">HB2362</a>  (Nurses): Arizona Nurses Association, Arizona State Board of Nursing, Arizona Alliance for Community Health Centers, Arizona Association of Health Plans, Arizona Bioindustry Association (AZBio), Arizona Chamber,  Arizona Osteopathic Medical Association, Arizona Medical Association (ARMA), Arizona Medical Board, Banner Health, Arizona Hospital and Healthcare Association, Dignity Health, Greater Phoenix Chamber of Commerce, Health Systems Alliance of Arizona,  Mayo Clinic, Phoenix Children’s Hospital, The CORE Institute</p><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;"><a target="_blank" href="http://www.azleg.gov/DocumentsForBill.asp?Bill_Number=2502&Session_Id=115&image.x=0&image.y=0" style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;color:rgb(30, 115, 190);transition:all 0.2s ease;">HB2502</a> (Physicians):   Arizona Alliance for Community Health Centers, Arizona Association of Health Plans, Arizona Bioindustry Association (AZBio), Arizona Chamber, AZ Chapter of American College of Emergency Physicians, Arizona Chapter Of The American Academy Of Pediatrics, The Arizona Academy Of Family Physicians, AZ Chapter of American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Arizona Osteopathic Medical Association, Arizona Medical Association (ARMA), Arizona Medical Board, Banner Health, East Valley Chambers of Commerce Alliance, Arizona Hospital and Healthcare Association, Arizona Technology Council, Dignity Health, Greater Phoenix Chamber of Commerce, Health Systems Alliance of Arizona, IOASE, Mayo Clinic, Phoenix Children’s Hospital, Tenet Healthcare,  The CORE Institute<br><a target="_blank" href="http://www.azleg.gov/DocumentsForBill.asp?Bill_Number=2503&Session_Id=115&image.x=0&image.y=0" style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;color:rgb(30, 115, 190);transition:all 0.2s ease;">HB2503</a> (Psychologists): Arizona Psychological Association,  Arizona Association of Health Plans , Arizona Bioindustry Association (AZBio), Arizona Chamber , Arizona Hospital and Healthcare Association , Greater Phoenix Chamber of Commerce, Phoenix Children’s Hospital<br><a target="_blank" href="http://www.azleg.gov/DocumentsForBill.asp?Bill_Number=2504&Session_Id=115&image.x=0&image.y=0" style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;color:rgb(30, 115, 190);transition:all 0.2s ease;">HB2504</a> (Physical Therapists):  Arizona Physical Therapy Association, AZ Alliance For Community Health Centers , Arizona Association Of Health Plans , Arizona Bioindustry Association (AZBio), Arizona Hospital And Healthcare Association, Greater Phoenix Chamber of Commerce, Phoenix Children’s Hospital, The CORE Institute</br></br></p><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;"><em style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;">Source:  Arizona Legislature RTS System.</em></p><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;"> </p><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;">Action by the Arizona House of Representatives has provided the vehicle that can deliver greater access to quality healthcare for the people of Arizona.    Now, the Arizona Senate has the ability to get on board too before the 2016 session draws to a close.</p></div><span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span></br></html></div>2016-03-28T07:00:00ZArizona BioIndustry Assoc
Beyond DNA: TGen points the way to enhanced precision medicine with RNA sequencingBeyond DNA: TGen points the way to enhanced precision medicine with RNA sequencing<div class="ExternalClassB345E43E51A14208AA3D9C70DF7B072E"><html> <div dir="ltr" style="text-align:left;" class="ExternalClass1A9E231B04D64CA58E0E5E8FF039BCAC"><span id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span>​PHOENIX, Ariz. - March 21, 2016 - Uncovering the genetic makeup of patients using DNA sequencing has in recent years provided physicians and their patients with a greater understanding of how best to diagnose and treat the diseases that plague humanity. This is the essence of precision medicine.<br><br> Now, researchers at the <a target="_blank" href="https://www.tgen.org/home.aspx"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0066cc">Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen)</font></span></a> are showing how an even more detailed genetic analysis using RNA sequencing can vastly enhance that understanding, providing doctors and their patients with more precise tools to target the underlying causes of disease, and help recommend the best course of action.<br><br> In their review, published today in the journal Nature Reviews Genetics, TGen scientists highlight the many advantages of using RNA-sequencing in the detection and management of everything from cancer to infectious diseases, such as Ebola and the rapidly spreading Zika virus.<br><br> RNA's principal role is to act as a messenger carrying instructions from DNA for the synthesis of proteins. Building on the insights provided by DNA profiling, the analysis of RNA provides an even more precise look at how cells behave and how medicine can intervene when things go wrong.<br><br> "RNA is a dynamic and diverse biomolecule with an essential role in numerous biological processes," said Dr. Sara Byron, Research Assistant Professor in TGen's Center for Translational Innovation, and the review's lead author. "From a molecular diagnostic standpoint, RNA-based measurements have the potential for broad application across diverse areas of human health, including disease diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutic selection."<br><br> DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) sequencing spells out -in order- the billions of chemical letters that make up the genes that drive all of our biologic make up and functions, from hair and eye color to whether an individual may be predisposed to cancer or other diseases.<br><br> RNA (ribonucleic acid) sequencing provides information on the genes that are actively being made into RNA in a cell and are important for cell function. While more complex, RNA holds the promise of more precise measurement of the human physical condition.<br><br> There simply are more forms, or species, that RNA takes, explains Dr. Byron. "RNA-sequencing provides an deeper view of a patient's genome, revealing detailed information on the diverse spectrum of RNAs being expressed."<br><br> One of the most promising aspects of RNA-based measurements is the potential of using extracellular RNA (exRNAs) as a non-invasive diagnostic indicator of disease. Monitoring exRNA simply takes a blood sample, as opposed to doing a tumor biopsy, which essentially is a minor surgery with greater risks and costs.<br><br> "The investigation of exRNAs in biofluids to monitor disease is an area of diagnostic research that is growing rapidly," said Dr. Kendall Van Keuren-Jensen, TGen Associate Professor of Neurogenomics, Co-Director of TGen's Center for Noninvasive Diagnostics, and one of the review's authors. "Measurement of exRNA is appealing as a non-invasive method for monitoring disease. With increased access to biofluids, more frequent sampling can occur over time."<br><br> The first test measuring exRNA was released earlier this year, the review said, for use measuring specific exRNAs in lung cancer patients. And, the potential for using RNA-seq in cancer is expanding rapidly. Commercial RNA-seq tests are now available, and provide the opportunity for clinicians to more comprehensively profile cancer and use this information to guide treatment selection for their patients, the review said.<br><br> In addition, the authors reported on several recent applications for RNA-seq in the diagnosis and management of infectious diseases, such as monitoring for drug resistant populations during therapy and tracking the origin and spread of the Ebola virus.<br><br> Using examples from discovery and clinical research, the authors also describe how RNA-seq can help guide interpretation of genomic DNA sequencing results. The utility of integrative sequencing strategies in research studies is growing across broad health applications, and points to the promise for incorporation of RNA-seq into clinical medicine, the review said.<br><br> The paper, Translating RNA-sequencing into Clinical Diagnostics: Opportunities and Challenges, was published online today in the journal Nature Reviews Genetics.<br><br> This review was funded by The Ben & Catherine Ivy Foundation of Scottsdale, the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, and a Stand Up To Cancer-Melanoma Research Alliance Melanoma Dream Team Translational Cancer Research Grant.<br><br> # # #<br>About TGen<br><br> Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. TGen is focused on helping patients with neurological disorders, cancer, and diabetes, through cutting edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research towards patient benefit). TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and rare complex diseases in adults and children. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities literally worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: <a target="_blank" href="https://www.tgen.org/home.aspx"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0066cc">www.tgen.org</font></span></a>. Follow TGen on <a target="_blank" href="https://www.facebook.com/helptgen"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0066cc">Facebook</font></span></a>, <a target="_blank" href="https://www.linkedin.com/company/tgen"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0066cc">LinkedIn</font></span></a> and <a target="_blank" href="https://twitter.com/TGen"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0066cc">Twitter @TGen</font></span></a>.<br><br>Press Contacts:<br> Steve Yozwiak<br> TGen Senior Science Writer<br> 602-343-8704<br><a target="_blank" href="mailto:syozwiak@tgen.org"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0066cc">syozwiak@tgen.org</font></span></a><span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></div> </html></div>https://biomedicalphoenix.com/Lists/News/Attachments/1/Dr_Sara_Byron.jpg2016-03-21T07:00:00ZTGen
Arizona Bioscience Roadmap Report for 2015 ReleasedArizona Bioscience Roadmap Report for 2015 Released<div class="ExternalClass8DACC87BACA44642ABA8E3AA764D62EB"><html> <p></p><header class="entry-header" style="zoom:1;margin-bottom:20px;color:rgb(51, 51, 51);font-family:'helvetica neue', helvetica, arial, 'lucida grande', sans-serif;font-size:13px;line-height:19.5px;background-color:rgb(252, 252, 252);"><span id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span><header class="entry-header" style="zoom:1;margin-bottom:20px;color:rgb(51, 51, 51);font-family:'helvetica neue', helvetica, arial, 'lucida grande', sans-serif;font-size:13px;line-height:19.5px;background-color:rgb(252, 252, 252);"><h1 style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-size:20px;font-style:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;color:rgb(59, 59, 59);line-height:1.35em;" class="entry-title"><a style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;color:inherit;" rel="bookmark" title="Permalink to Arizona Bioscience Roadmap Report for 2015 Released" href="http://www.azbio.org/arizona-bioscience-roadmap-report-for-2015-released" target="_blank">Arizona Bioscience Roadmap Report for 2015 Released</a></h1><div style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-size:12px;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;color:rgb(143, 143, 143);" class="entry-meta">Posted on <a style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;color:rgb(94, 94, 94);" rel="bookmark" title="12:02 pm" href="http://www.azbio.org/arizona-bioscience-roadmap-report-for-2015-released" target="_blank">Tue/29/March</a> <span style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;" class="byline">by <span style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;" class="author vcard"><a style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;color:rgb(94, 94, 94);" rel="author" title="View all posts by Joan Koerber-Walker" href="http://www.azbio.org/author/joan-koerber-walker" class="url fn n" target="_blank">Joan Koerber-Walker</a></span></span></div></header><div style="border:0px;font-family:'helvetica neue', helvetica, arial, 'lucida grande', sans-serif;font-size:13px;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;zoom:1;line-height:1.6em;color:rgb(102, 102, 102);background-color:rgb(252, 252, 252);" class="entry-content"><div style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;" data-summary="" data-link="http://www.azbio.org/arizona-bioscience-roadmap-report-for-2015-released" data-title="Arizona Bioscience Roadmap Report for 2015 Released" data-app="share_buttons" data-app-id="11403751" class="shareaholic-canvas"></div><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;">By the Numbers:  Arizona bioscience job growth rate continues to outpace nation; Risk capital and university startups increase; Research dollars decline<span style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;"></span></p><div style="border:1px solid rgb(224, 224, 224);font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:5px auto 30px;outline:0px;padding:8px;vertical-align:baseline;clear:both;max-width:100%;box-sizing:border-box;text-align:center;width:924px;" class="wp-caption aligncenter"><img style="max-width:100%;margin:5px;width:553px;" alt="Flinn RM Report Header 2015 Data" src="http://11759-presscdn-0-15.pagely.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/Flinn-RM-Report-Header-2015-Data.jpg" class="wp-image-14217 size-full" /><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;" class="wp-caption-text"><em style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;">The Phoenix-based Flinn Foundation commissioned the latest performance analysis as part of its coordination of Arizona’s Bioscience Roadmap, a long-term strategy to guide the state through 2025. The data released in the March 29 report, the first new metrics in two years, was provided by TEConomy Partners, formerly Battelle Technology Partnership Practice</em>. <strong style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;"><em style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;"><a style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;color:rgb(30, 115, 190);transition:all 0.2s ease;" target="_blank" href="http://11759-presscdn-0-15.pagely.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/2015-Bio-Progress-Report.pdf"><br>Click here to view/download the report</br></a>.</em></strong></p></div><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;"><strong style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;">Arizona’s bioscience industry has sustained its momentum and continues its long-standing trend of impressive job growth and high wages, according to a new report released by the Flinn Foundation on March 29, 2016.</strong></p><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;">In addition, risk capital reached its highest figure in four years, and all measures of bioscience tech-transfer at Arizona universities are on the rise, with increases in startups, invention disclosures, patents, and licenses.</p><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;">However, declining research dollars and expenditures raise concerns about the industry’s long-term capacity to keep adding jobs. National Institutes of Health grants and bioscience-related academic research-and-development expenditures both dropped in the latest year of data and are failing to keep pace with the nation.</p><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px 0px 0px 30px;vertical-align:baseline;">“There is evidence of innovation throughout Arizona and many positive economic signs, as the number of high-paying bioscience jobs continue to increase at an impressive rate,” said Mitch Horowitz, principal and managing director of TEConomy Partners. “However, we are concerned about the declines in NIH grants and R&D bio expenditures. If creative steps are not taken to reverse these trends, the state’s bioscience industry will be hard-pressed to keep growing.”</p><div style="border:1px solid rgb(224, 224, 224);font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:0px 0px 1.5em 1.5em;outline:0px;padding:8px;vertical-align:baseline;display:inline;float:right;max-width:100%;box-sizing:border-box;text-align:center;width:252px;" class="wp-caption alignright"><img style="max-width:100%;margin:5px;width:234px;" alt="Flinn Foundation Logo" src="http://11759-presscdn-0-15.pagely.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/flinn-foundation-logo.jpg" class="wp-image-588" /><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;" class="wp-caption-text">The Flinn Foundation is a privately endowed, philanthropic grantmaking organization established in 1965 by Dr. Robert S. and Irene P. Flinn to improve the quality of life in Arizona to benefit future generations. In addition to advancing the biosciences, the foundation supports the Flinn Scholarship, a merit-based college scholarship program, arts and culture, and the Arizona Center for Civic Leadership. Learn more at <a style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;color:rgb(30, 115, 190);transition:all 0.2s ease;" target="_blank" href="http://www.flinn.org/">Flinn.org</a></p></div><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;">Arizona’s Bioscience Roadmap was commissioned by the Flinn Foundation, a philanthropic grantmaking organization, in 2002 with a goal of increasing access for Arizonans to health innovations while diversifying and strengthening the state’s economy.</p><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;">The long-term strategy was updated in 2014 to lead the state through 2025.</p><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;">The Roadmap’s vision is for Arizona to become globally competitive and a national leader in in the biosciences in such fields as precision medicine, cancer, neurosciences, bioengineering, diagnostics, and agricultural biotechnology.</p><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;"><strong style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;">The most recent data shows:</strong></p><ul style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;list-style:square;"><li style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:0px 0px 0px 1.5em;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;"><strong style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;"> </strong>Arizona has added 36,700 bioscience jobs between 2002 and 2014, a 49 percent increase that brings today’s total to 110,410, including hospitals. Bioscience jobs have grown nationally at a 14 percent rate during this time.</li><li style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:0px 0px 0px 1.5em;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;">The average salary of a bioscience worker is $61,823, compared to $46,514 for the state’s private sector. Bioscience salaries have increased 50 percent since 2002.</li><li style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:0px 0px 0px 1.5em;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;">In 2015, Arizona saw its highest venture-capital investments for bioscience firms since 2011.The $82 million attracted is the third straight year of growth. It represents 0.56 percent of bioscience venture capital investments nationwide, the highest rate since 2011, but still well below the Roadmap’s goal.</li><li style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:0px 0px 0px 1.5em;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;">NIH funding was $151 million in 2015, down from $158 million in 2014. Since the start of the Roadmap, Arizona’s NIH annual funding has grown 12 percent compared to 40 percent for the top-10 funded states, which Arizona generally had met or exceeded during previous years. NIH grants are the gold standard in the biosciences.</li><li style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:0px 0px 0px 1.5em;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;">The value of bioscience R&D expenditures was $451 million in 2014, a slight drop from 2013. Arizona’s growth rate of 55 percent since 2002 falls short of the national growth rate of 78 percent.</li><li style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:0px 0px 0px 1.5em;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;">All measures of bioscience tech-transfer at Arizona universities are on the rise and are outperforming other university research disciplines in technology-transfer activities. University bio-related startups increased 24 percent in 2014-15 compared to the previous two years. During this same time, there was a 72 percent increase in patents and a 54 percent increase in invention disclosures.</li></ul><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;">Setting aside hospitals, the largest bioscience subsector, Arizona has 24,040 bioscience jobs in 1,284 establishments, with an annual wage of $76,360.</p><blockquote style="border-width:0px 0px 0px 1px;border-left-style:solid;border-left-color:rgb(170, 170, 170);font-family:inherit;font-style:italic;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px 1em 1em;outline:0px;padding:0px 0px 0px 1em;vertical-align:baseline;"><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;">“We are very encouraged by the continued growth of the bioscience industry and our best risk-capital performance in four years,” said Ron Shoopman, chair of Arizona’s Bioscience Roadmap Steering Committee. “But leaders must emerge in the state to make the necessary strategic research investments. If not, we risk falling behind in not only developing new treatments, but in the commercialization of this research, which is crucial for job growth and building a critical mass of companies.”</p></blockquote><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;">There were a number of major developments in 2015 through partnerships and collaborations involving private-sector companies, Arizona’s public universities, hospitals, and research labs. For instance, Arizona State University and Nantworks, led by billionaire physician and entrepreneur Patrick Soon-Shiong, announced they will build a research hub on the Phoenix Biomedical Campus. On the same campus, the University of Arizona Cancer Center at Dignity Health St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center opened its new facility. Banner Health completed its acquisition of the University of Arizona Health Network and is investing in new hospital construction while becoming the academic partner of UA’s medical schools in Tucson and Phoenix.</p><blockquote style="border-width:0px 0px 0px 1px;border-left-style:solid;border-left-color:rgb(170, 170, 170);font-family:inherit;font-style:italic;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px 1em 1em;outline:0px;padding:0px 0px 0px 1em;vertical-align:baseline;"><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;">“As this new data shows, the investments made during the early years of the Roadmap are paying huge dividends for Arizona today,” said Jack B. Jewett, president & CEO of the Flinn Foundation. “The ongoing collaboration among our leading institutions has created an opportunity for innovation and for the bioscience industry to continue its momentum through the years.”</p></blockquote><p style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-style:inherit;font-weight:inherit;margin:1em 0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;">The next data report will be released in 2018.​</p></div><span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span><h1 style="border:0px;font-family:inherit;font-size:20px;font-style:inherit;margin:0px;outline:0px;padding:0px;vertical-align:baseline;color:rgb(59, 59, 59);line-height:1.35em;" class="entry-title"><br></br></h1></header></html></div>https://biomedicalphoenix.com/Lists/News/Attachments/2/Flinn-RM-Report-Header-2015-Data.jpg2016-03-21T07:00:00ZArizona BioIndustry Assoc
TGen identifies 'hypervirulent' strain of strep outbreak in Arizona and the SouthwestTGen identifies 'hypervirulent' strain of strep outbreak in Arizona and the Southwest<div class="ExternalClass2E529122DBAA47B887750192F430050E"><html> <p> <strong>TGen identifies 'hypervirulent' strain of strep outbreak in Arizona and the Southwest</strong> </p> <p>The emm59 clone of Group A Streptococcus is a deadly type of bacterial infection related to a previous outbreak in Canada </p> <p> <strong>FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. - March 18, 2016 -</strong> The <a href="https://www.tgen.org/home.aspx" target="_blank"><span style="text-decoration:underline;">Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen)</span></a> has helped state, local and tribal health officials identify an outbreak of "hypervirulent" strep bacteria in the American Southwest.<br> <br>Identified in Flagstaff, Ariz., from January to July 2015, this outbreak of the <em>emm59</em> clone of group A <em>Streptococcus</em> is directly related to cases identified recently in New Mexico. This strain type appears to have evolved from a nationwide outbreak in Canada that lasted from 2006-09, according to a report in the April issue of <em>Emerging Infectious Diseases</em>.<br> <br>"The presence of <em>emm59</em> in the southwestern United States poses a public health concern," said Dr. Paul Keim, Director of TGen's Pathogen Genomics Division (TGen North) in Flagstaff, and the senior author of the report.<br> <br>Group A strep is what commonly causes strep throat and sometimes can cause invasive skin infections. This <em>emm59</em>type of strep appears to more predominantly cause sever skin infections and fever that can present as necrotizing fasciitis, also known as flesh-eating bacteria, which can cause the loss of limbs and even death.<br> <br>Using advanced genomic sequencing, TGen investigators were able to track isolates of <em>emm59</em> throughout northern Arizona, and link it to cases in New Mexico and elsewhere, as part of the strain that came out of the Canada epidemic.<br> <br>"When compared with all other publically available U.S. <em>emm59</em> isolate genomes, a significant number of Flagstaff cases had group A strep strains that were identical. This tells us that we have an outbreak of this particularly nasty superbug," said Dr. David Engelthaler, Director of Programs and Operations at TGen North, and the lead author of the study.<br> <br>In conducting the analysis of this strep outbreak during the past year, TGen worked closely with doctors and epidemiologists at Northern Arizona Healthcare, the Arizona Department of Health Services, the Coconino County Public Health Services District, Northern Arizona University, and the Navajo Nation Division of Health.<br> <br>"Epidemiologic investigations are ongoing in Arizona to further determine the extent of the current strep outbreak, and to help minimize it's spread, especially to at-risk populations," said Dr. Engelthaler, who also is a TGen Associate Professor and Arizona's former State Epidemiologist.<br> <br>In addition, efforts are being made in education and outreach in Arizona especially among homeless and jail populations, which the study identified as vulnerable to this outbreak.<br> <br>Read the full report on the investigation here: <a href="http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/22/4/15-1582_article" target="_blank"><span style="text-decoration:underline;">http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/22/4/15-1582_article</span></a><br> <br># # #<br> <br><strong>About TGen</strong><br> Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. TGen is focused on helping patients with neurological disorders, cancer, and diabetes, through cutting edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research towards patient benefit).  TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and rare complex diseases in adults and children. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities literally worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: <a href="https://www.tgen.org/home.aspx" target="_blank"><span style="text-decoration:underline;">www.tgen.org</span></a>. Follow TGen on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/helptgen" target="_blank"><span style="text-decoration:underline;">Facebook</span></a>, <a href="https://www.linkedin.com/company/tgen" target="_blank"><span style="text-decoration:underline;">LinkedIn</span></a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/TGen" target="_blank"><span style="text-decoration:underline;">Twitter @TGen</span></a>.</p> </html></div>2016-03-18T07:00:00ZTGen

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