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Arizona's Biomedical HubHTML ContentNavy1.00000000000000Arizona's Biomedical Hub<div class="ExternalClass78B4DD2EB29946DEB4169C22964C116D"><html> In a field as exciting and competitive as the biomedical sciences, every opportunity to excel must be taken. The City of Phoenix recognized the wide variety of institutions within the field, and took the opportunity to integrate them on a diverse, balanced biomedical campus. Nowhere else in the region can such a talented mix of doctors, researchers, innovators, educators, allied health professionals and thought leaders be found all at one address in Downtown Phoenix.<span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span> </html></div>1
Explore the PossibilitiesVideoLight Gray2.00000000000000Explore the Possibilities<div class="ExternalClass4B7E6E90CB4148F2BB86033BDF5B36BC"><html> <p> <span aria-hidden="true" id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fL3bCjwkS0s" target="_blank">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fL3bCjwkS0s</a></p> </html></div>

 

 

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Beyond DNA: TGen points the way to enhanced precision medicine with RNA sequencingBeyond DNA: TGen points the way to enhanced precision medicine with RNA sequencing<div class="ExternalClassB345E43E51A14208AA3D9C70DF7B072E"><html> <div dir="ltr" style="text-align:left;" class="ExternalClass1A9E231B04D64CA58E0E5E8FF039BCAC"><span id="ms-rterangepaste-start"></span>​PHOENIX, Ariz. - March 21, 2016 - Uncovering the genetic makeup of patients using DNA sequencing has in recent years provided physicians and their patients with a greater understanding of how best to diagnose and treat the diseases that plague humanity. This is the essence of precision medicine.<br><br> Now, researchers at the <a target="_blank" href="https://www.tgen.org/home.aspx"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0066cc">Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen)</font></span></a> are showing how an even more detailed genetic analysis using RNA sequencing can vastly enhance that understanding, providing doctors and their patients with more precise tools to target the underlying causes of disease, and help recommend the best course of action.<br><br> In their review, published today in the journal Nature Reviews Genetics, TGen scientists highlight the many advantages of using RNA-sequencing in the detection and management of everything from cancer to infectious diseases, such as Ebola and the rapidly spreading Zika virus.<br><br> RNA's principal role is to act as a messenger carrying instructions from DNA for the synthesis of proteins. Building on the insights provided by DNA profiling, the analysis of RNA provides an even more precise look at how cells behave and how medicine can intervene when things go wrong.<br><br> "RNA is a dynamic and diverse biomolecule with an essential role in numerous biological processes," said Dr. Sara Byron, Research Assistant Professor in TGen's Center for Translational Innovation, and the review's lead author. "From a molecular diagnostic standpoint, RNA-based measurements have the potential for broad application across diverse areas of human health, including disease diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutic selection."<br><br> DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) sequencing spells out -in order- the billions of chemical letters that make up the genes that drive all of our biologic make up and functions, from hair and eye color to whether an individual may be predisposed to cancer or other diseases.<br><br> RNA (ribonucleic acid) sequencing provides information on the genes that are actively being made into RNA in a cell and are important for cell function. While more complex, RNA holds the promise of more precise measurement of the human physical condition.<br><br> There simply are more forms, or species, that RNA takes, explains Dr. Byron. "RNA-sequencing provides an deeper view of a patient's genome, revealing detailed information on the diverse spectrum of RNAs being expressed."<br><br> One of the most promising aspects of RNA-based measurements is the potential of using extracellular RNA (exRNAs) as a non-invasive diagnostic indicator of disease. Monitoring exRNA simply takes a blood sample, as opposed to doing a tumor biopsy, which essentially is a minor surgery with greater risks and costs.<br><br> "The investigation of exRNAs in biofluids to monitor disease is an area of diagnostic research that is growing rapidly," said Dr. Kendall Van Keuren-Jensen, TGen Associate Professor of Neurogenomics, Co-Director of TGen's Center for Noninvasive Diagnostics, and one of the review's authors. "Measurement of exRNA is appealing as a non-invasive method for monitoring disease. With increased access to biofluids, more frequent sampling can occur over time."<br><br> The first test measuring exRNA was released earlier this year, the review said, for use measuring specific exRNAs in lung cancer patients. And, the potential for using RNA-seq in cancer is expanding rapidly. Commercial RNA-seq tests are now available, and provide the opportunity for clinicians to more comprehensively profile cancer and use this information to guide treatment selection for their patients, the review said.<br><br> In addition, the authors reported on several recent applications for RNA-seq in the diagnosis and management of infectious diseases, such as monitoring for drug resistant populations during therapy and tracking the origin and spread of the Ebola virus.<br><br> Using examples from discovery and clinical research, the authors also describe how RNA-seq can help guide interpretation of genomic DNA sequencing results. The utility of integrative sequencing strategies in research studies is growing across broad health applications, and points to the promise for incorporation of RNA-seq into clinical medicine, the review said.<br><br> The paper, Translating RNA-sequencing into Clinical Diagnostics: Opportunities and Challenges, was published online today in the journal Nature Reviews Genetics.<br><br> This review was funded by The Ben & Catherine Ivy Foundation of Scottsdale, the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, and a Stand Up To Cancer-Melanoma Research Alliance Melanoma Dream Team Translational Cancer Research Grant.<br><br> # # #<br>About TGen<br><br> Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. TGen is focused on helping patients with neurological disorders, cancer, and diabetes, through cutting edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research towards patient benefit). TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and rare complex diseases in adults and children. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities literally worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: <a target="_blank" href="https://www.tgen.org/home.aspx"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0066cc">www.tgen.org</font></span></a>. Follow TGen on <a target="_blank" href="https://www.facebook.com/helptgen"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0066cc">Facebook</font></span></a>, <a target="_blank" href="https://www.linkedin.com/company/tgen"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0066cc">LinkedIn</font></span></a> and <a target="_blank" href="https://twitter.com/TGen"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0066cc">Twitter @TGen</font></span></a>.<br><br>Press Contacts:<br> Steve Yozwiak<br> TGen Senior Science Writer<br> 602-343-8704<br><a target="_blank" href="mailto:syozwiak@tgen.org"><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><font color="#0066cc">syozwiak@tgen.org</font></span></a><span id="ms-rterangepaste-end"></span></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></div> </html></div>
TGen identifies 'hypervirulent' strain of strep outbreak in Arizona and the SouthwestTGen identifies 'hypervirulent' strain of strep outbreak in Arizona and the Southwest<div class="ExternalClass2E529122DBAA47B887750192F430050E"><html> <p> <strong>TGen identifies 'hypervirulent' strain of strep outbreak in Arizona and the Southwest</strong> </p> <p>The emm59 clone of Group A Streptococcus is a deadly type of bacterial infection related to a previous outbreak in Canada </p> <p> <strong>FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. - March 18, 2016 -</strong> The <a href="https://www.tgen.org/home.aspx" target="_blank"><span style="text-decoration:underline;">Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen)</span></a> has helped state, local and tribal health officials identify an outbreak of "hypervirulent" strep bacteria in the American Southwest.<br> <br>Identified in Flagstaff, Ariz., from January to July 2015, this outbreak of the <em>emm59</em> clone of group A <em>Streptococcus</em> is directly related to cases identified recently in New Mexico. This strain type appears to have evolved from a nationwide outbreak in Canada that lasted from 2006-09, according to a report in the April issue of <em>Emerging Infectious Diseases</em>.<br> <br>"The presence of <em>emm59</em> in the southwestern United States poses a public health concern," said Dr. Paul Keim, Director of TGen's Pathogen Genomics Division (TGen North) in Flagstaff, and the senior author of the report.<br> <br>Group A strep is what commonly causes strep throat and sometimes can cause invasive skin infections. This <em>emm59</em>type of strep appears to more predominantly cause sever skin infections and fever that can present as necrotizing fasciitis, also known as flesh-eating bacteria, which can cause the loss of limbs and even death.<br> <br>Using advanced genomic sequencing, TGen investigators were able to track isolates of <em>emm59</em> throughout northern Arizona, and link it to cases in New Mexico and elsewhere, as part of the strain that came out of the Canada epidemic.<br> <br>"When compared with all other publically available U.S. <em>emm59</em> isolate genomes, a significant number of Flagstaff cases had group A strep strains that were identical. This tells us that we have an outbreak of this particularly nasty superbug," said Dr. David Engelthaler, Director of Programs and Operations at TGen North, and the lead author of the study.<br> <br>In conducting the analysis of this strep outbreak during the past year, TGen worked closely with doctors and epidemiologists at Northern Arizona Healthcare, the Arizona Department of Health Services, the Coconino County Public Health Services District, Northern Arizona University, and the Navajo Nation Division of Health.<br> <br>"Epidemiologic investigations are ongoing in Arizona to further determine the extent of the current strep outbreak, and to help minimize it's spread, especially to at-risk populations," said Dr. Engelthaler, who also is a TGen Associate Professor and Arizona's former State Epidemiologist.<br> <br>In addition, efforts are being made in education and outreach in Arizona especially among homeless and jail populations, which the study identified as vulnerable to this outbreak.<br> <br>Read the full report on the investigation here: <a href="http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/22/4/15-1582_article" target="_blank"><span style="text-decoration:underline;">http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/22/4/15-1582_article</span></a><br> <br># # #<br> <br><strong>About TGen</strong><br> Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. TGen is focused on helping patients with neurological disorders, cancer, and diabetes, through cutting edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research towards patient benefit).  TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and rare complex diseases in adults and children. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities literally worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: <a href="https://www.tgen.org/home.aspx" target="_blank"><span style="text-decoration:underline;">www.tgen.org</span></a>. Follow TGen on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/helptgen" target="_blank"><span style="text-decoration:underline;">Facebook</span></a>, <a href="https://www.linkedin.com/company/tgen" target="_blank"><span style="text-decoration:underline;">LinkedIn</span></a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/TGen" target="_blank"><span style="text-decoration:underline;">Twitter @TGen</span></a>.</p> </html></div>
MRSA detection technology developed by TGen-NAU is granted first patentMRSA detection technology developed by TGen-NAU is granted first patent<div class="ExternalClass2AFF7E49290D48D59EEF4F86F2E8F2C7"><html> <p> <strong> <em>Test for 'superbug' bacterial infections created by DxNA under license from TGen-NAU</em> </strong> </p> <p> <strong>PHOENIX, Ariz. — June 15, 2016 —</strong> <strong> </strong>Antibiotic-resistant infections should be easier to detect, and hospitals could become safer, thanks to a technology developed by the <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=Jj/0NKbnVEY%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=http://www.tgen.org/"><span style="text-decoration:underline;">Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen)</span></a> and Northern Arizona University (NAU), and protected under a patent issued by Australia.<br> <br>Soon, similar patent approvals are expected by the U.S., Canada, European Union, Japan, Brazil and other nations for this "superbug" test developed by TGen and NAU, and licensed to DxNA LLC, a company based in St. George, Utah.<br> <br>"This rapid, 1-hour test will precisely identify a family of antibiotic-resistant <em>Staph</em> infections we broadly refer to as MRSA," said Dr. Paul Keim, Director of TGen's Pathogen Genomics Division, or TGen North, based in Flagstaff. <br><br>"We hope this technology will be adopted worldwide by hospitals and clinics, and will help identify and isolate these dangerous and difficult-to-eliminate infections that have come to plague our medical institutions," said Dr. Keim, who also is the Cowden Endowed Chair of Microbiology at NAU, and Director of NAU's Center for Microbial Genetics and Genomics (MGGen). "The result should be more rapid diagnosis, improved treatment of patients, and reduced medical costs."<br> <br>MRSA — Methicillin-resistant <em>Staphylococcus aureus</em> — is an antibiotic-resistant form of the <em>Staph</em> bacteria that annually kills more Americans than HIV. <br><br>While MRSA technically refers to one particular strain of <em>Staph</em>, the genomics-based test developed by TGen, NAU and DxNA can precisely detect multiple types of drug-resistant <em>Staph</em> bacterial infections, including drug resistant Coagulase Negative Staphylococcus (CSN), a much more common infection than MRSA.<br> <br><em>Staph</em> infections are the most common hospital-acquired or associated infections. While most of the focus over the past few years has been on MRSA, in terms of incidence and total cost, strains of <em>Staph</em> other than MRSA are a much more common problem.<br> <br>Due to the increasing use of implantable biomaterials and medical devices, infections are increasingly caused by CNS. This is a type of <em>Staph</em> that is often resistant to multiple antibiotics and has a particular affinity for these devices.<br> <br>"Rapid identification and differentiation of these resistant bacteria is key to optimizing treatment decisions that significantly impact patient outcomes and cost of care," said David Taus, CEO of DxNA LLC. "Given that resistant CNS is a frequent pathogen in surgical site infections, orthopedic and cardiac device infections, and blood stream infections — among others — it is critical that we be able to rapidly identify and determine antibiotic resistance to provide for appropriate pre-surgical antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent infections and early and effective treatment when these infections do occur."<br> <br>Current molecular tests for MRSA all ignore CNS, rendering their results significantly less useful in treating patients given that drug resistant CNS infections are many times more common than MRSA.<br> <br>DxNA's <em>Staphylococcus Test</em> identifies and differentiates resistant and non-resistant strains of <em>Staph</em> and CNS. The test uses three separate proprietary biomarker targets and a proprietary methodology to determine which types of <em>Staph</em> are present, and which carry the gene that causes antibiotic-resistance in these bacteria.<br> <br>"The test also is effective in identifying infected specimens where there are multiple types of <em>Staph</em>. The test will rapidly provide broader clinically-actionable results, improving antibiotic prophylaxis, early targeted intervention resulting in more effective treatment at lower costs," Taus said.<br> <br># # #<br> <br><strong>About TGen</strong><br> Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. TGen is focused on helping patients with neurological disorders, cancer, and diabetes, through cutting edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research towards patient benefit).  TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and rare complex diseases in adults and children. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities literally worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=Jj/0NKbnVEY%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=http://www.tgen.org/home.aspx"><span style="text-decoration:underline;">www.tgen.org</span></a>. Follow TGen on <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=Jj/0NKbnVEY%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=https://www.facebook.com/helptgen"><span style="text-decoration:underline;">Facebook</span></a>, <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=Jj/0NKbnVEY%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=https://www.linkedin.com/company/tgen"><span style="text-decoration:underline;">LinkedIn</span></a> and <a target="_blank" href="http://www.tgen.org/umbraco/newsletterstudio/tracking/trackclick.aspx?nid=Jj/0NKbnVEY%3d&e=epZbQvMvsHIsYFfTx0pNS26K/Y%2bATcOsjG3gojRlcMs%3d&url=https://twitter.com/TGen"><span style="text-decoration:underline;">Twitter @TGen</span></a>.<br> <br><strong>Media Contact:</strong><br> Steve Yozwiak<br> TGen Senior Science Writer<br> 602-343-8704<br> <a target="_blank" href="mailto:syozwiak@tgen.org"><span style="text-decoration:underline;">syozwiak@tgen.org</span></a><br><span style="text-decoration:underline;"> </span><br><strong>About DxNA LLC</strong><br> <br>DxNA is a privately held company located in St. George Utah. It is a molecular diagnostics company that develops and distributes portable, fully-integrated systems and tests for infectious disease in the medical, agricultural, food safety, and biosecurity markets. The Company's systems and technologies enable rapid and precise molecular testing to take place on-site by allowing for otherwise complex laboratory procedures to be performed almost anywhere. DxNA's patented GeneSTAT® portable Real Time PCR molecular diagnostic testing system will allow individuals with minimal training to conduct accurate real-time diagnostic testing in virtually any location including laboratories, clinics, physician offices, emergency rooms or field settings. Designed with economy in mind, GeneSTAT is inherently less costly than the real time PCR systems typical of clinical laboratories.<br> <br><strong>About Northern Arizona University</strong><br> Northern Arizona University is a high-research university with a statewide enrollment of 28,000 students. More than 20,000 students attend the Flagstaff campus, with 8,000 students enrolled online and at Extended Campus sites statewide. Research in genetics, forestry and ecology has drawn international recognition to the university, which also is highly regarded for its education, business and engineering programs. NAU launched competency-based Personalized Learning in 2013, the first self-paced, online education program that cuts the cost and time to an undergraduate degree.</p> </html></div>

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